What Do You LIKE About Being an LPN?

  1. We read so many posts from frustrated LPNs feeling that we are not valued, not really nurses, etc...

    What I would like to know from viewers is what do you LIKE about being an LPN/LVN?

    I like the hands on knowledge, am excited about learning new basic skills, and have a passion for patient teaching. Most patients love speaking to me because I break it down to them in simple terms that most of them understand. I still continue to read material, not for passing an exam, but because there is not as much pressure involved as it was in class, but reading it for comprehension, gaining new perspectives on things that previously confused me and seeing something in there that I didn't notice before (because I was stressed). I love listening to the doctors speak and knowing that I comprehend what is happening (that really excites me). And, I do like being a part of the team. I find that even the RNs come to me for clarity on certain things because I am always reading. They know that they'll get up to date information from me.

    Of course, I am dragged down because of the high volume I see, and short staff. I get frustrated with patients that will take no responsibility of their own health; expecting us to make it happen for them. At times, I want to leave nursing, not because I don't like it, but because I am tired and do not see things getting better for the patients or the staff. That is another issue. I do get annoyed with people who feel that we are not really nurses, or that management brushes them off. But, I do love being a licensed practical NURSE (the word nurse is capitalized because yes, we ARE nurses as well).
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  2. 22 Comments

  3. by   peridotgirl
    aren't LPN nurses, anyways??
  4. by   LucyLPN
    I totally agree with all the reasons you cited in your post. In addition to the patient care experience that I gain as an LPN, I personally think that being an LPN has open more doors for me, in that I can now proceed to become an RN without having to wait... in some NS's today, LPNs can just apply to the LPN mobility programs, if they meet other selection requirements, LPNs can purse the LPN-ADN, or the LPN-BSN degrees. So, yes, I'm proud to be an LPN! My main goal is to become an NP and being an LPN is not a bad way to start to achieve my final goal. I believe that one can achieve more with the RN degree and gain the much deserved respect from colleagues and other disciplines. Yes, LPNs are definitely NURSES too... no question about that and should be respected!
  5. by   shirley88
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    We read so many posts from frustrated LPNs feeling that we are not valued, not really nurses, etc...

    What I would like to know from viewers is what do you LIKE about being an LPN/LVN?

    I like the hands on knowledge, am excited about learning new basic skills, and have a passion for patient teaching. Most patients love speaking to me because I break it down to them in simple terms that most of them understand. I still continue to read material, not for passing an exam, but because there is not as much pressure involved as it was in class, but reading it for comprehension, gaining new perspectives on things that previously confused me and seeing something in there that I didn't notice before (because I was stressed). I love listening to the doctors speak and knowing that I comprehend what is happening (that really excites me). And, I do like being a part of the team. I find that even the RNs come to me for clarity on certain things because I am always reading. They know that they'll get up to date information from me.

    Of course, I am dragged down because of the high volume I see, and short staff. I get frustrated with patients that will take no responsibility of their own health; expecting us to make it happen for them. At times, I want to leave nursing, not because I don't like it, but because I am tired and do not see things getting better for the patients or the staff. That is another issue. I do get annoyed with people who feel that we are not really nurses, or that management brushes them off. But, I do love being a licensed practical NURSE (the word nurse is capitalized because yes, we ARE nurses as well).

    Interesting post/thread
  6. by   sharona97
    I love the confidence that the LPN education gave me. Quickly to follow was the compassion, and like Pagan described, breaking down info so patients can have the opportunity to understand.

    I love keeping my knowledge up by reading and applying as well. I utilize the docs, fellow nurses, lab techs and such to see how the big picture all fits together.

    I found I love science and am so amazed at the anatomy and physiology of the human being. And when I give it my all the best I can, I feel I have been blessed to participate in the care of people. And fortunate to get it! And have those ah ha moments.

    I love to share my time and help, when I can, it just makes for a better environment to help someone in need, whether it's the patient or a co-worker.
  7. by   TheCommuter
    I like the opportunities for advancement, flexible scheduling, steady income, and range of different specialties. I can try hospice, home health, psych, med/surg, or any number of areas if I grow increasingly tired of the nursing home setting.

    I also like having peace of mind with regard to the economic situation. People will become sick, and will always need our services. I worked at a paper products factory for 3 years, and layoffs were always a worrisome issue, because the skills I learned at the factory were not really transferrable to other career fields. The education and training that I accrued during my time in the LVN program seems to be readily adaptable to other workplaces, thereby enabling me to have more options.
  8. by   SuesquatchRN
    Commuter, I can't imagine you doing factory work.

    Well, let me rephrase that. There are a lot of really smart people stuck doing really lousy jobs. I'm glad you escaped.

    I guess what I like about being an LPN is that I was able to use Excelsior for my RN. There is very little mobility in rural NY, and aside from nursing homes LPN's are used very infrequently unless they've been there a bazillion years.
  9. by   Drysolong
    I am glad to be an LPN. I am in a learning stage as I'm new to hospital Med-Surg. I know my experience as an LPN will make me an excellent RN, my next goal.
  10. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from Suesquatch
    Well, let me rephrase that. There are a lot of really smart people stuck doing really lousy jobs. I'm glad you escaped.
    Actually, factory work was less stressful than working as an LVN.

    All of my coworkers were male, so I didn't have to deal with the cattiness, gossip, and estrogen-fueled passive aggression that I see in so many female-dominated healthcare facilities. Men will engage in 'guy talk,' but it's not nearly as bad as what I've witnessed when I'm around bitter women.

    I was also able to work my 12 hour shifts and leave without any legal responsibility over other people, no visitors to bother me, no docs to round with, no pillow fluffing requests, and so on. I simply got dirty with paper dust at the factory, cleaned the massive 3-story machines, kept them going, then left. The stress was minimal, and the $15.21 hourly pay rate was not too shabby.

    However, I needed to retrain. Manufacturing is a very unstable career field with few options for those who intend to transfer their factory skills to another career pathway. Frankly, most hiring managers do not care if you know how to lubricate a machine motor or use visegrip pliers properly.
  11. by   caliotter3
    I like the fact that as long as I have a job, being an LVN allows me to work in nursing at all.
  12. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Actually, factory work was less stressful than working as an LVN.

    All of my coworkers were male, so I didn't have to deal with the cattiness, gossip, and estrogen-fueled passive aggression that I see in so many female-dominated healthcare facilities. Men will engage in 'guy talk,' but it's not nearly as bad as what I've witnessed when I'm around bitter women.

    I was also able to work my 12 hour shifts and leave without any legal responsibility over other people, no visitors to bother me, no docs to round with, no pillow fluffing requests, and so on. I simply got dirty with paper dust at the factory, cleaned the massive 3-story machines, kept them going, then left. The stress was minimal, and the $15.21 hourly pay rate was not too shabby.
    Heh. I earn less than that as an LPN up here, and less than I did as a word processor.
  13. by   pagandeva2000
    I can say another thing I like about being an LPN...just received a call for another assignment with the US Army for tomorrow and Saturday as a vaccination nurse. They are putting us up in a hotel for two days, even though it is about an hour from where I reside, and the pay for these two days will be $800, plus I had another assignment with them last week and made $240 for that day. I get to see gorgeous men, slum in a hotel with some silly friends and get paid. Wish this was my REGULAR job though... :0)
  14. by   karen2
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    We read so many posts from frustrated LPNs feeling that we are not valued, not really nurses, etc...

    What I would like to know from viewers is what do you LIKE about being an LPN/LVN?

    I like the hands on knowledge, am excited about learning new basic skills, and have a passion for patient teaching. Most patients love speaking to me because I break it down to them in simple terms that most of them understand. I still continue to read material, not for passing an exam, but because there is not as much pressure involved as it was in class, but reading it for comprehension, gaining new perspectives on things that previously confused me and seeing something in there that I didn't notice before (because I was stressed). I love listening to the doctors speak and knowing that I comprehend what is happening (that really excites me). And, I do like being a part of the team. I find that even the RNs come to me for clarity on certain things because I am always reading. They know that they'll get up to date information from me.

    Of course, I am dragged down because of the high volume I see, and short staff. I get frustrated with patients that will take no responsibility of their own health; expecting us to make it happen for them. At times, I want to leave nursing, not because I don't like it, but because I am tired and do not see things getting better for the patients or the staff. That is another issue. I do get annoyed with people who feel that we are not really nurses, or that management brushes them off. But, I do love being a licensed practical NURSE (the word nurse is capitalized because yes, we ARE nurses as well).

    I like the hands-on experience, along with the opportunity to do patient teaching. Being a LPN has given me the opportunity to finally call myself a nurse, and yes pagandeva we are NURSES The career advancement for me is an added bonus... sometimes I just giggle when I remember that some of my nursing educators really started out as being LPNs, so being an LPN is a great start.

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