Tired of Hearing the One Year Experience Required Line!! - page 2

by MalzANurse25

13,646 Views | 60 Comments

So like many of you on here I am a new graduate seeking that ever so hard to get 1st job!! But if I hear the You need one year of experience line again I just might lose my mind!! LOL I mean one guy from an agency even... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from merrywhiterose
    Many nurses work in Long-Term Care to get their year in. I'm working in one now. My experience there has included working with trachs, g-tubes, IV's, skin issues of many types, delegation, dealing with drs. & families, & experience w/all types of meds & labs. Most people don't think there would be any good experience in LTC but in reality there is a lot of experience to be had.
    On the one hand one is happy to hear of new grads landing their first gig and therefore obtaining the experience most hospitals require, but looking from the otherside sooner or later those that run and or are responsible for staffing LTCs are going to get fed up with a revolving door of hires and start looking for more stable staff.

    Again am not hating or anything but don't be surprised in future if those whom own LTCs start crying to Congress or others they need to import nurses because of issues with hiring American new grads.
  2. 2
    I also agree. I graduated from nursing school in May and started my job search end of January starting my last semester because my classmates all were going crazy about the job hunt. I was one of those people who assumed that they were too paranoid besides we were going to graduate from a prestigious school so what's the worry, right? Wrong. I was promised a job on my unit as an intern and it turned out to be a horrible back and forth battle. My nurse manager needed a body more than a new nurse. I decided to complete my schedule and go back home 90 miles away to search for a job and study for the NCLEX-RN. I passed and still had no interviews after more than 50 applications and resumes sent. Depression starting to set in, I had to keep going. I finally get a call for an interview mid summer and it changed my whole summer. I was looking and preparing for this interviewer. After the interview, I was invited to a position on a the specialty I wanted (ICU). So, it only took 4 months after graduation and a very long job search process but talk to your fellow classmates, see if you can move to places that are hiring new grads, do what you have to in order to get that first year experience. It will get better, Good Luck!
    NursieNurseLPN and tnmarie like this.
  3. 5
    This is why I feel nursing school should mandate experience in nursing as a requirement to enter the program. No one should be allowed to enter a LPN program without having worked for a year as a CNA. And make a year of LPN experience a mandatory requirement to enter any RN program. The cumulative knowledge would make the new grad at every level a better nurse and would eliminate having new grads with zero experience.
  4. 2
    Quote from tnmarie
    You know those places that everyone tells you not to go to unless you are desperate? To get that first year of experience, most people have to go to those places and work a year there. There are also usually places known for not requiring experience (though I'm sure that list is a lot shortner now). Just keep applying and trying, that's all you can do!
    Before I'd consider applying to a known terrible place to work, I'd consider relocating somewhere jobs were more numerous, if at all possible, as the poster above suggested.
    MombearNurse and joanna73 like this.
  5. 3
    I disagree, Brandon. I wanted to be an RN...not an LPN or a CNA. I learned everything I needed to in nursing school to start my career. I didn't get orientation when I went to work on a med surg floor because it was expected that my years in nursing school had prepared me to hit the floor running. It was hard...it was scary, but it was the norm and back then, no one would have thought to complain since we were all happy to have jobs.
    MombearNurse, anie10, and joanna73 like this.
  6. 1
    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    I disagree, Brandon. I wanted to be an RN...not an LPN or a CNA. I learned everything I needed to in nursing school to start my career. I didn't get orientation when I went to work on a med surg floor because it was expected that myyears in nursing school had prepared me to hit the floor running. It was hard...it was scary, but it was the norm and back then, no one would have thought tocomplain since we were all happy to have jobs.
    Instead of viewing each role (CNA, LPN, RN) as a separate profession in and of themselves, I like the idea of it being a single continuumwhere one starts at the bottom (CNA) and progresses stopping at whatever level they wish, taking it step by step as they go. Of course, this is not for everybody. And I work with many wonderful RNs who never worked a day as an aide or LPN. But I think their first year or so was much more terrifying for them because of this lack of experience. That's a lot of responsibility to take on all at once for someone who is new to their role and new to patient care in general.
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  7. 4
    Well....I don't view CNAs as 'the bottom'. They are a hugely important part of the team. But that's getting away from the point of this thread.
    MombearNurse, ren3741LPN, anie10, and 1 other like this.
  8. 1
    Keep your chin up, you will find that job. I have been a nurse for11 years. I wanted out of LTC. So I left when they where trying to make it difficult for to change to 11to 7a shift. Tried for 6 mo. After leaving I decided I would go for a day platoon in Dr. Office. I get the same 1 yr. Exp there. Like you said either know someone or eventually it will land in your favor. GOOD LUCK!!!!!!!
    NursieNurseLPN likes this.
  9. 1
    I meant bottom as in first step. And only a 'step' if one choses. Many CNAs are happy where they're at and don't view their job as a "stepping stone" to anything.
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  10. 2
    Brandon there is a different thought process between yourself and others. You view Nursing as vocational, like electricians ... where you learn on the Job and progress to be an electrician . I consider RN to a "professional" position on par with other "college" educated professionals, where their was zero prior knowledge or experience needed.
    alex1987 and anie10 like this.


Top