Second thoughts

  1. Hello Everyone,

    Is there anyone that can relate to my delimma? I've been an LPN for 4 year and I am currently working on my RN, but I also work on the SNF unit to my hospital. I started working for this company a few months, ago and I'm truley frustrated. The problem is that the working conditions are unfair and wrong. There's not enough staff, and the Managers and Administion are always crying about the budget. 1 RN, 2 LPN's and 2 CNA's during my shift. When I started I was told that the RN does not get an assignment, whereas the 2 LPNs split the floor. The max # of beds equal 26 and they are always full, the RN/ charge nurse does nothing, but take off some of the orders if the clerk doesn't and maybe calls the doctor. As an lpn for this unit you have to do all your meds, treatments, charting, and notes on all your patients. On top of that we have to deal with a manager that is plan arrogant and uncoth.

    I'm frustrated because the RN should have an assignment or at least some patients from each LPN. When you bring it up to the manager she doesn't listen, and when there is chaios on the floor she doesn't even put on her sneaker to help. I'm now at the point where I'm looking to go elsewhere. I love nursing, but i'm not sure if I can continue on at this pace. I'm in school now for my RN, but I'm really questioning whether it's for me. Does it get any better than what I'm going through.
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   Tweety
    I would say hang in there and get your RN so you can get the heck out of there.

    Good luck!
  4. by   pagandeva2000
    You may be working with a lazy RN. Others may be a bit more cooperative with sharing assignments. Most people entering into a new career or an upgrade wonder if they are ready...this is normal. Complete the course, at least.

    Also, if there are other jobs to consider, do so. They do seem to be unfair. Good luck!
  5. by   tmani
    :spin:Thank you for the replies, I truly appreciate it. I do plan to complete the program but, I just hope that I'm not wasting my time. I love nursing and believe that this is where my heart is.
  6. by   caliotter3
    By all means, complete your course. Becoming an RN will open doors for you that you never imagined existed. Your RN is lazy and thoughtless. Someday she will be in a situation where she might be treated in the same manner. Do not let her unwillingness to engage in team work bring you down. I worked in LTC. On my shifts (even in the hell hole place I worked at), we helped each other, RN or LVN. The house supervisor had an assignment, and wouldn't hesitate to help. Very few, and far between, have I seen nurses who refuse to help their peers. You will find another place of employment, before or after you get your RN, where you won't see this negative behavior. Good luck to you and hang in there.
  7. by   BuddahNature
    Tmani, I am sorry to hear you are going through such a hard time.Do take care of yourself.If you have an administration that will not change,and tells you the RN does not take an asignment,then your choices are clear cut,stay or leave.If you stay,then you know what you will get.If you leave.before you go abide your time,in the best way possible,which means not complaining ,which may cause you not to get a good reference for your next position. Everywhere you go to work may not be cup of tea,but that is why you have a license.You have options out there,just waiting for you to explore.
    Try not to let anyone rain on your parade,if you want to be an RN,keep going.Don't let one situation impact you negatively.
  8. by   Fiona59
    Actuallly, it sounds like LTC up here. The RNs never have patient assignments in the facilities I worked in. They were in "manager" type positions. They dealt with orders and families. Every so often one would do a wound care round to see if debridement might be needed but that was it.

    One of my favourite RNs actually told me that she hated the paperwork job that her role in the facility had come to. RNs are too expensive to have on the floors working as nurses.

    PNs are the backbone and workhorse of LTC>

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