New LPN and no jobs available. - page 3

I live in Tulsa and just received my license 2 weeks ago. The hospitals around here are not hiring LPNs but they were when I started school. I'm a nurse tech at my hospital and human resources wants... Read More

  1. by   ladybay
    I didn't realize that some hospitals in California aren't hiring LPN's too. I thought it was just a phase only in my neck of the woods. I wonder if this is happening nationwide or just in certain states? Only time will tell when and if the nursing shortage would get to the code blue point to where hospitals would have to either reinstate LPN's, continue using agency nurses or recruit foreign nurses. We'll see.

    ladybay
  2. by   reyna
    i've found out that in salem, oregon there's only 1 hospital in the area and that they don't hire lvns/lpns...lvn there are all in skilled/nursing facilities...
  3. by   lehua
    lvn's are greatly needed from what ive seen at the few clinical sites ive been to. the trend (if the rn's & lvn's are correct at the clinicals), is to remove cna's from the payroll and broaden lvn work to inlude cna care. so no job where you live or overworked to death over here. good luck and keep your chin up!
  4. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from ladybay
    ....... I want to utilize my skills like assessments, injections, meds, nursing dx, IV monitors, tube feedings, blood draws and IV's, utilizing a stethoscope, becoming familiar with various medical situations, you know nurse stuff.........
    ladybay
    You can do all of these things and more in a sub-acute/rehab unit in a LTC facility.
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from ladybay
    I didn't realize that some hospitals in California aren't hiring LPN's too. I thought it was just a phase only in my neck of the woods. I wonder if this is happening nationwide or just in certain states?
    In California, it probably has more to do with the new RN ratio law. They're cutting back on support positions to free up more money to hire more RNs and meet the new ratio requirements. Just FYI.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on May 14, '04
  6. by   KacyLynnRN
    A lot of LPN's have posted on here about how no hospitals in their area are hiring LPN's...I live in Indianapolis, Indiana and the hospitals here are clammering for LPN's (as well as RN's) I work in a local hospital and almost everyweek there are several positions open for LPN's, mostly on Med/Surg. I wonder if it has anything to do with the fact that LPN's in this state seem to do a whole lot more then most other states...here in Indy we push IV meds, blood transfusions, assessments (except initial), start IV's, etc... Right now at work we are very short staffed, they are offering a $350 bonus check for picking up extra shifts they deam 'critical' shifts (usually weekends) and that is for the LPN's as well...I wonder if the nursing shortage is particularly bad here in Indiana or what??
  7. by   RN-PA
    Quote from KacyLynnLPN
    I work in a local hospital and almost everyweek there are several positions open for LPN's, mostly on Med/Surg. I wonder if it has anything to do with the fact that LPN's in this state seem to do a whole lot more then most other states...here in Indy we push IV meds, blood transfusions, assessments (except initial), start IV's, etc...
    I work with a lot of LPN's on our med-surg unit and called our nurse educator the end of last week to ask her if LPN's could take patients with morphine drips. We were told that they could not take a patient with endstage cancer who was on a Dilaudid drip a while back. It seems ridiculous to me. The patient I had to take last week, rather than an LPN, was a DNR/comfort-care patient who died two days after initiating the morphine drip. Why couldn't an LPN have taken that patient? The RN has to titrate the narcotic drips which is fine with me, as we do for IV heparin drips, but LPN's are allowed to take patients on IV heparin. So as it stands now, LPN's at our hospital cannot: hang blood, take verbal orders or sign off orders, do admissions, hang TPN, take patients with PCA or continuous epidural, give IV push meds, or start IV's. I haven't heard from our nurse educator yet, but I plan to ask administration these questions if the educator or my unit's nursing director can't give me a good reason why our LPN's can do so little, unless it's related to PA's scope of nursing practice and policies for LPN's.

    Is this just Pennsylvania's or my hospital's ridiculous rules?
    I'm off to do a search about PA's regulations for LPN's....
  8. by   marymary
    Quote from ladybay
    I live in Tulsa and just received my license 2 weeks ago. The hospitals around here are not hiring LPNs but they were when I started school. I'm a nurse tech at my hospital and human resources wants to move towards an all RN staff, thanks to Wellsprings coming in and revamping hospital policies. :angryfire I even make more money (with shift diff) than a new grad LPN at my hospital. I want to leave my job sooo bad. The only hospital that did have a position was for a prn wound care nurse. I find it sad to resort to changing dressings after all I've learned in school. Where is a newbie to get some hospital experience? I even contacted various places like home health, hospices, dialysis and agency, nothing. Agencies require 6-12 months med-surg experience. I'd hate to lose those hard earned nursing skills by going to a nursing home. Before I can even think of RN school, I need to start working as a nurse, get some skills and make decent money first. I want to utilize some critical nursing skills like med-surg but if no one gives me a chance, what can I do? I can't move out of state with a house and husband (who has a couple of surgeries pending). its frustrating.

    ladybay
    Hi
    I have been a LPN for ten years. When I graduated in 1994 I had the same scenerio and I was content until I got frustated with the limitations and went back to school. Apply for employment elsewhere; nursing homes, doctors' offices, assistive living and prisions. It may not be what you want but you will gain other experience;medication knowledge, treatments, communication skills...etc. After one year or six months of working go back to school and work toward the RN. The rest will follow. Remember always..when one door closes another one opens...
    :hatparty: P.S. I graduate on May 27 with honors. NCLEX next month. You can do it too!
  9. by   ladybay
    marymary,

    It looks like that's exactly what I am forced to do. I don't have much of a choice. It seems some states are in desperate need of LPN's and some are severely limiting us, just like here where I am. I can't figure out for the life of me why this is so if there is such a nurse shortage. Thanks anyway.

    ladybay
  10. by   cna on her way
    Quote from ladybay
    I didn't realize that some hospitals in California aren't hiring LPN's too. I thought it was just a phase only in my neck of the woods. I wonder if this is happening nationwide or just in certain states? Only time will tell when and if the nursing shortage would get to the code blue point to where hospitals would have to either reinstate LPN's, continue using agency nurses or recruit foreign nurses. We'll see.

    ladybay
    I actually think it pertains to the hospitals more than the states. Several hospitals in NC aren't utilizing LPNs anymore but there are a handful that will. It is up to the administration and the budget restraints I am sure. Just a note on wound care nursing, I worked in the Burn unit as a CNA2 for over a year and it was a wonderful job. You learn alot more than you expect when you deal with wounds. Theres so many different treatments and techniques. I saw Stephens Johnsons syndrome, Nephratitis facyitis (however it is spelled its the flesh eating disease that begins with a boil and tunnels under the skin), and all types of burns as well as chronic decubitis ulcers that were huge. It can be very rewarding. But its all up to preference. Maybe at this point even a position your not impressed with could be a blessing since it gets your foot in the door should another one come open in the hospital. I wish you the best of luck, just don't give up.
  11. by   SKM-NURSIEPOOH
    when i began lpn school, surrounding hospital in both south jersey & philadelphia were hiring/recruiting ls...but by the time i graduated only ten short months later....they all either required one to two years experience or phasing out the ls all together. i can remember a lot of ls had their titles taken away from licensed practical nurse to med tech :angryfire ! let me preface now that in no way am i putting mt down....but i do find it hurtful to take a title away from folks who worked damn hard to obtained.

    that being said....what i ended-up doing was enlist the us army reserve in order to 'get experience.' once i did my basic training & returned to my unit...i was promoted from specialist (s4) & commissioned as a non commissioned officer or sergeant (sgt)...and i did all of this as what the kids at that time called me ~ a grandma cuz i was 29 y/o single mom... :chuckle. after that i went back to the civilian sector & all sorts of doors opened. of course....with all of the 'war' & 'fighting' going on now...this probably wouldn't be an attractive option for you or your family...but it is something to consider. two of my fellow graduate nurses (from a bsn program) were just recently commissioned on pinning night as full-time officers....one went with the air force nurse corps & the other went with the navy nurse corps. even though i'm done with my army reserves obligation....i'm even considering getting commissioned in the air force nurse corps for flight nursing....but i want to first work in critical care & apply to crna school. the army is the only branch of the armed forces that recruit ls...& up to age 36. the rest will take ls & place them in techs positions. rns are taken by all armed forces up to the age of 48/49...but i believe you have to have your bsn in order to be commissioned for active duty status. i know rn-adn/aas are commissioned in the army reserves...i'm not sure about the other components though.
    the thing i'm getting at is when i came back to the civilian sector....many places that had that 'one to two' years experience then waved those criteria & i was able to pick & chose were i wanted to work.

    at any rate....do consider areas like sub-acute (this is the closest i'll do in terms of ltc cuz it does require a lot of med/surg skills), physicians' offices but do apply to the ones attached or affiliated with university hospitals (they tend to pay more), assistant living is also very nice (sort of in the ltc area but with a huge difference....stable & for the most part independent residents)...in fact....you can go really far in assistant living sector as a l. many ls here are working as supervisors & managers for assistant living facility...they work under one rn don who is responsible for the facility & is on call around the clock. you'll find more autonomy working in assistant living. and don't forget about dialysis centers (good place for ls).

    whatever you do decide....good luck to you & :hatparty: congrats on your accomplishment!

    cheers!
    moe
  12. by   marymary
    Quote from ladybay
    marymary,

    It looks like that's exactly what I am forced to do. I don't have much of a choice. It seems some states are in desperate need of LPN's and some are severely limiting us, just like here where I am. I can't figure out for the life of me why this is so if there is such a nurse shortage. Thanks anyway.

    ladybay
    Hi,
    I just wanted to add one more comment, I feel compelled. I learned alot about the nursing shortage among other things this past year. One thing that I found very disturbing; LPN's are not considered "nurses" by the nursing community. They are considered ancillary staff. That is why you will see them in separate unions when unions are present in facilities. Sometimes they will be in the same unions with CNA's, housekeeping, etc.... Amazing isn't it? So when the discussion is about the nursing shortage, they are talking about a shortage of RN's not LPN's. If they allowed LPN's back into the hospitals there would not be a "nursing " shortage. Go back to school and complete your education to give yourself more leverage. Good luck.
    :hatparty:
    Last edit by marymary on May 24, '04
  13. by   pickledpepperRN
    In 1991 the United States Supreme Court designated eight bargaining units for acute care hospital employees.
    I think it unfortunate and misguided that RNs were placed in a separate unit rather than a 'licensed nurse' unit. The fact that we must be in separate units separates nurses when we need to be united. Just my opinion along with many other RNs who value the work of our fellow nurses.

    LVNs in California who attend the CNA CE classes become better educated regarding the legalities of scope of practice.

    The CNA position is that the percentage of LVNs needs to remain the same as before the ratio law or 17% of licensed nurses working in acute care.

    We did get laws passed for scholarships for students accepted into an RN program.
    WE KNOW that many new grad RNs leave the profession in the first two years.
    LVNs and CNAs have proven they are emotionally equipped to handle patient care. They are often the finest RNs.

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