Medical assistants and LPNs - page 13

HI all, I have just finished a medical assisting program and im now looking for a job. I have noticed alot of job openings for lpn but nothing for medical assistants. I was wondering first of... Read More

  1. by   kat7ap
    Quote from softstorms
    I really do not think LPN's can do an IV "push" in any state.There is no Law that says an LPN can "push" any med. Not in Florida or any other state.
    I know this is off subject but... that statement is a broad generalization. In the states where I am licensed (Washington and Texas) LPN/LVNs are permitted to do IVP. The hospital where I work allows me to only do a limited number of drugs IVP after had 1 year acute care experience and a completed a competency test and yearly review.
    From the WA BON:
    "Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) may, under the supervision of a registered nurse, administer intravenous medications and fluids provided the LPN has had the appropriate education and practice".
    https://fortress.wa.gov/doh/hpqa1/hp...-ivtherapy.pdf
    From the TX BON:
    "The ability of a LVN to administer specific IV fluids or drugs, to prepare and/or administer IV "piggy-back" or IV "push" medications, or to monitor and titrate "IV drip" medications of any kind is up to facility policy."
    http://www.bon.state.tx.us/practice/position.html#15.3
  2. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from AnnemRN
    I just found this article on a medical assistant working beyond their scope with tragic results. If I were an MA, I think I would contact the medical board of the state I worked in for a list of procedures allowable and within my scope of practice. I don't think I would rely on what the physician says is okay, especially after reading this article.

    www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/111-01062008-1466490.html
    Scary...makes the entire situation scary. This is basically why nurses are nervous about working or being responsible for someone that does not work under their auspice. If the licensed nurse is aware that something is not right, and yet, the MA is working under the auspice of the physician, and harm occurs, the consumer's attorney would rightfully say that the licensed nurse knows better and should have interceded. But, if this happened and, say, the nurse is not in the room, maybe even unaware, then, she may have alot to answer for. Just like the doctor was brought up on charges, but (at least at this time), the MA was not.
  3. by   OgopogoLPN
    Quote from AnnemRN
    I just found this article on a medical assistant working beyond their scope with tragic results. If I were an MA, I think I would contact the medical board of the state I worked in for a list of procedures allowable and within my scope of practice. I don't think I would rely on what the physician says is okay, especially after reading this article.

    www.phillyburbs.com/pb-dyn/news/111-01062008-1466490.html

    Wow, that article is an eye-opener!! I also used to be a medical assistant for a dermatologist. There is NO WAY I ever would have removed warts or "cut out things"!!! Very scary that some doctors would allow MA's to do such things.
  4. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from softstorms
    and you may need to check your facts.
    I have checked my facts, and I am permitted to give certain medications via IV push in my state of residence. Texas has a very wide, progressive scope of practice for LPNs/LVNs.

    Always keep in mind that while one state can be very restrictive on LPNs regarding IV therapy, there's another state that's always more inclusive.
  5. by   AnnemRN
    "Among the more infamous cases involves a Pennsylvania certified medical assistant, who, acting on a doctor's orders, administered an experimental intravenous drug treatment that killed a 5-year-old boy in 2005. The doctor who authorized the unapproved treatment for autism spectrum disorder faces civil and criminal charges including manslaughter. The medical assistant, who reportedly never administered an IV-push before, has not been charged."

    Here's the article regarding the Pennsylvania physician's trial and the MA who gave the IV push drug mentioned in the above paragraph:

    www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7009177915
  6. by   navvet
    So, what we have here is the Pyramid of Health Care knowlege in the good ole U.S.: RNs work in Hosps and acute care managment, Lpns work LTC and home care because of BON rules (can't push meds ect.) MAs can work under a Docs license because they are certified and recognised by the Med Board and can do what ever a Doc feels comfy with and because he can pay them less for not being "Licensed." And poor ole CNA's bathe and clean up everyone's crap. Now we have the Big Picture it's all about the MONEY,STATUS, and NAME TAG. Can't we all just be professional and get along....take care of the sick people.
  7. by   ink10300
    Quote from softstorms
    I really do not think LPN's can do an IV "push" in any state.There is no Law that says an LPN can "push" any med. Not in Florida or any other state. When you say you are allowed to do things "out of your scope" in Florida, then I wonder where you get your information from? Nope, you can not. and you may need to check your facts.

    I'm not sure where you get your facts but what I said was if you are under DIRECT supervision of the RN or MD AND you have been trained you can.
    What I also meant from "out of scope", and your right I could have worded it better, I meant that we would not be able to perform independently- meaning - under direct supervision..
    (It is also very common for an LPN to provide IV TX and provide IV pushes in the home care world. I did not believe it until I checked it out myself, I've only lived here for a year).
    But don't take my word for it...

    So now if you will glance below, you know exactly where I get my information from.

    Here is a copy of the link straight from the Florida Board of Nursing:
    https://www.flrules.org/gateway/Rule...ID=64B9-12.003

    But I will paste it here for you as well:

    64B9-12.003 Aspects of Intravenous Therapy Outside the Scope of Practice of the LPN.
    (1) Aspects of intravenous therapy which are outside the scope of practice of the licensed practical nurse [B]unless under the direct supervision of the registered professional nurse or physician and which shall not be performed or initiated by licensed practical nurses without direct supervision include the following:
    (a) Initiation of blood and blood products;
    (b) Initiation or administration of cancer chemotherapy;
    (c) Initiation of plasma expanders;
    (d) Initiation or administration of investigational drugs;
    (e) Mixing IV solution;
    (f) IV pushes, except heparin flushes and saline flushes.
    (2) Although this rule limits the scope of licensed practical nurse practice, it is appropriate for licensed practical nurses to care for patients receiving such therapy.
  8. by   Super Nurf
    I personally believe no aide should have the responsibility of doing something another person has to be licensed to do. It surely is a labor cost issue and bothers me when I see an aide doing things like this.(Not the aide personally, but the system behind it). Why bother having any licensure of nurse if you are able to hire someone off the street to do it? It really makes no sense for Drs to be able to hire like this.
  9. by   asoonernurse
    Quote from ink10300
    Exceptions:As a matter of fact, medical assistants can't do anything supervised by a nurse. A medical doctor MUST be present at all times.
    Can anyone here actually see an MD following an MA around the office, just so he or she can "be present" when the MA does the procedure?

    Me either...
  10. by   asoonernurse
    What's an ASS degree? :chuckle

    Quote from luvbnMA
    N you right the only jobs that are available for LPN are in the nursing homes with the elderly or taking care of them something I would totally rather not do. And why would an MA take an CNA job, I pretty much doubt that..why go to school for 9-24 mon.. and get a job as an CNA that in NO. takes one day to complete be real.. MA states that the LPN job are similar because they are. We are not the one's who made up the curriculum or job descriptions and i don't think just because I do have my ASS. Degree that I'm more qualified I'm just letting you kno that we will never be a CNA if anything they are more closer to LPN. 1 more thing if you ever look on the internet for an MA job it is listed as LPN/MA not CNA/MA so you tell me why we think they are similar. And not to have any misunderstanding I do kno that there are some differences but also more similar factors.
  11. by   Super Nurf
    Not sure but I think most nurses could test out fairly well for an ASS degree!!!!
  12. by   txspadequeenRN
    i think you need to check your facts. i have been a texas lvn many years and pushed more drugs than i care to count...



    Quote from softstorms
    i really do not think lpn's can do an iv "push" in any state.there is no law that says an lpn can "push" any med. not in florida or any other state. when you say you are allowed to do things "out of your scope" in florida, then i wonder where you get your information from? nope, you can not. and you may need to check your facts.
  13. by   militarymom06
    Comparing a MA to an LPN is like comparing an LPN to an RN...they are different. Yes, an LPN can do much the same as an RN, in GA...but, there are alot of things an RN can do that an LPN cannot do. Same with MA's. Yes, the schooling is similar, but an LPN is licensed, and MA's aren't.

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