LVN >10 years...still questioning if this is right for me

  1. I have been an LVN for more than 10 years. I thought I had passed that stage of wondering if I had picked the right profession. I am now facing the decision to go back to school. I am really wondering if I should get my RN or throw in the towel and go for something completely different??? I love my patients and some colleages along the way, but for the most part I feel completely disenchanted with the whole thing. The odd hours are making me feel old. The ungrateful families are making me sad. The physicians I work with now give me absolutely no respect. I was working in a great team environment in a large suburb of Dallas but now have moved to south Texas and it is very "old school" nursing if anyone understands that. I have worked several different fields and have never really found my niche. I just constantly feel like a "fake" even though I get compliments on my demeanor. I currently work pediatrics and it has only mad me feel that much worse. The population is >80% medicaid and even though it shouldn't it does honestly make me bitter. The parents are for the most part young and uneducated. I know it is my job to educate but it has become overwhelming. I have found myself wanting to walk out and never look back. The stress is consuming me. Do I just need a break or has the time come to bow out gracefully???
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  2. 6 Comments

  3. by   BigB
    I was in your shoes. I hated my LVN job in LTC and I did something about it... I left the feild of LTC completly and have been so happy ever since. Never stay in a job you don't fully enjoy..it's not worth it. Explore all yopur job options as well as school.
  4. by   Jules A
    Hi,
    My thoughts are that school might just add a fresh perspective to your life. I'd buy some time taking gen ed classes that will work toward whatever degree you might decide to pursue. Sometimes just shaking up the routine a bit provide some clarity. Best of luck to you, Jules
  5. by   BigB
    Quote from Jules A
    Hi,
    My thoughts are that school might just add a fresh perspective to your life. I'd buy some time taking gen ed classes that will work toward whatever degree you might decide to pursue. Sometimes just shaking up the routine a bit provide some clarity. Best of luck to you, Jules
    That is what i did, I not only left the feild of nursing i was in (LTC), but I started working on my B.S. degree, which I will complete this june. My degree is not in nursing , but managment, and it can open doors down the road if I want to change career paths. People on average go through about 7 different career changes these days, so you never know what job you may be in next year. Best thing you can do is be prepared.
  6. by   pagandeva2000
    I think that you should begin to search out other options. Getting your RN would open doors for you, but, there are many RNs that feel the same way that you do, with additional responsibility. Drs still yell at them, their subordinates do not appreciate what they (or you) have gone through, some patients will still be demanding and unreasonable. Take time to speak to the RNs that you are working with as well as others that you know and get their perspective. But, you will have more options to choose from, and maybe you have gone as far as you can mentally, spiritually and physically in the LPN career.

    Maybe considering speaking to a college advisor to see if you can gain insight and advice, see what courses a college in your area may offer and go from there. I can understand burn out, believe me. I am a new LPN, but not new to the nursing career. I had been an aide, medical assistant, phlebotomist, etc... so, now, I am an actual nurse with that sort of responsibility of teaching, and being frustrated when I see so many people not taking responsibility for their well-being. I settled in my mind that I will do as much as the patient will allow. If I see that they are really interested, I will hyperextend, but if they are not, then, they definitely will get what they need, but, I can't totally break my neck for each and every stubborn person; it will reduce my energy for those that do, in fact, need. It may sound cold, but that is a reality. It will conserve energy for the bigger things.
  7. by   rierie
    thank you all so much for the response. I do plan on going back to school while I ponder that future with or without an RN but it is nice knowing that someone else may have the same perspective as I do. Anyone have anyideas about how to get a loan to cover living expenses for the next year. I would like to quit work and concentrate on school full time. But I have run intoa brick wall with the Financial aide office. They told me because I made too my money last year that I only qualify for $7,500 for the whole next year. Are you kidding me!!! But if I was to quit work and live in my car for a year while working at McDonalds I could have all the money I neded. My boyfriend is a police officer in a small community and he makes less than 23,000 a year...yes that's it. So try and figure rent and 2 car payments, groceries, gas, electric and tuition/books. I mean we don't live like we need anything. We shop at walmart, we eat out a taco bell. Very few credit cards to claim all with low balances. I am just not sure how it works. Do I have to take out a personal loan first and then try to requalify after I have been out of work for a year? Even so everyone wants a co signer. My boyfriend and I have no family that has any money to lend or would be able to qualify as a cosigner. We soley support ourselfs. If there is anyone out there that can tell me what they did in assimilair situation please let me know and don't ask me if I filled out a FAFSA...yes and I make too much money!...such a vicious circle.
    thanks for all the input
  8. by   Fiona59
    I'm going through this right now. I love my job but have had a run of "patients from hell". Bellectomy anyone?

    I'm lucky to be able to say NO to extra shifts. I think I'm just going to work my part time scheduled hours and no more.

    I don't want to be an RN, I've seen enough nurses of both level leave the field due to injury, stress, or just to go anywhere else.

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