LPNs NOT Medicating?? - page 2

I have been reading some posts where people are stating that as LPNs they are not allowed to medicate. This baffles me, because I am trying to imagine what the focus was in their nursing programs. ... Read More

  1. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from kranken_schwester
    All nurses need to be able to assess their patients so they can provide the proper care--that's the bulk of what nursing is. LPNs absolutely assess their patients and give PRN medications.
    Our state NPA states that an intitial assessment is to be performed by an RN, then subsequent assessments can be performed by LPNs. This is simply not possible when you have a 40 bed med surg unit and one or two RNs with the rest of the staff being LPNs. LPNs do give prn medications, but they do not give IVP, narcs, hang blood, etc. I agree that assessment is part of the nursing process, it's what sets nurses apart from unlicensed staff.
  2. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from augigi
    LPNs generally cannot do "assessments" of patients.
    The only type of facility where LPNs/LVNs are NOT allowed to do the initial assessment is at the acute care hospital. However, LPNs are permitted to do all follow-up assessments in the hospital setting.

    I have spent most of my short nursing career in nursing homes and LVNs are legally allowed to do the initial assessment when a patient is admitted to any type of extended care facility.
  3. by   TheCommuter
    By the way, passing medications comprises about 75 to 80 percent of my job duties at my current workplace. Texas also allows LVNs to give narcotics and IV-push medications, basically everything except hang and spike blood.
  4. by   pagandeva2000
    <<<<<When I was an LPN, I once worked in a hospital on the east coast where only the RN's passed the meds.

    I thought this must be customary to the area and/or facility until one day the charge nurse said "I didn't know that you could pass meds, so go ahead and give your own meds now."

    Huh??

    What LPN doesn't pass meds??

    Apparantly many at this hospital, but I thought it was the strangest thing ever.
    If LPN's in some states aren't taught about meds in school, what exactly are they being trained to do during their programs?

    Insert foleys, change dressings, and give enemas?[/QUOTE]>>>>

    This very message right here made me initiate this thread! SOME LPNs are not allowed to administer meds!! I cannot phantom what the focus was in school, or how to justify hiring them at the facilities that they are working for...it is almost like they are advanced aides. I am hoping that someone here can help me to understand what their main fuction is and what they learned in school. This is not to insult, this is just a buring curiousity of mine.
  5. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    Our state NPA states that an intitial assessment is to be performed by an RN, then subsequent assessments can be performed by LPNs. This is simply not possible when you have a 40 bed med surg unit and one or two RNs with the rest of the staff being LPNs. LPNs do give prn medications, but they do not give IVP, narcs, hang blood, etc. I agree that assessment is part of the nursing process, it's what sets nurses apart from unlicensed staff.
    In New York, we are not mandated to hang IVs through our state, but the facility can require that we do, therefore if so, they have to train and certify us, so I am able to hang IVPs. We do pass narcartics, but do not do IV push. We can hang blood with additional training (I personally won't bother to do that, though).
  6. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from pagandeva2000
    In New York, we are not mandated to hang IVs through our state, but the facility can require that we do, therefore if so, they have to train and certify us, so I am able to hang IVPs. We do pass narcartics, but do not do IV push. We can hang blood with additional training (I personally won't bother to do that, though).
    Let me clarify, our LPNs can hang IV meds and IVPB (IV piggy backs) if they are IV certified, but cannot do IVP (IV push). Sorry for the confusion. And I am not certain, but I think they cannot hang some IV meds that are particularly potent or dangerous like K+, etc.
  7. by   CHATSDALE
    you automatically access a pt each time you see them
    all nurses do pass meds and do prns...may not be a primary part of your day depending where you are working but you should be capable of doing so and knowledgeable about side effects and lack of effectiveness..
    which drugs b/ps or pulses are required etc
  8. by   pagandeva2000
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    Let me clarify, our LPNs can hang IV meds and IVPB (IV piggy backs) if they are IV certified, but cannot do IVP (IV push). Sorry for the confusion. And I am not certain, but I think they cannot hang some IV meds that are particularly potent or dangerous like K+, etc.
    You didn't confuse me...:spin: I understood what you were meaning. I hung potassium and magnesium (was scared each time I did it, but I certainly hung them and prayed) as well as vancomycin...pretty much everything. We didn't have much distinction of what IVPs to hang. Maybe other states did. I was never comfortable hanging potassium, so, that is something I wish they would take from us, to be honest.
  9. by   nursesaideBen
    The hospital I'm working the LPN's can do IV starts, IVPB, and most IV pushes, I know one of the drugs they can't push is Ativan because of a nasty incident where a nurse pushed the drug too quickly and they patient wound up on a vent in CCU for about a week Yikes!! They can spike blood however they can't hang it unless there's an RN witnessing. They can do initial assessments if an RN co signs it of course our LPN's can't administer meds through a central line or anything like that. It's amazing how every nursing program, state policies, and hospital policies are so different!! I know in my program we've focused a LOT on meds and in clinicals we give all the meds including IV meds. My instructor rocks because she wants us to learn as much as we can.
  10. by   MsLady06
    Quote from Avelinne
    Not in AZ. There is a pilot program here in AZ that is training CNA's to pass meds under the supervision of a nurse. The CNA must pass the medication administration course for CNA's and then TA-DA, they can pass meds. So if the CNA's are being allowed to pass meds here in AZ, I can't see why other states would forbid LPN's from passing meds.
    alot of hospitals are doing this. thats why LPN are not really needed.
  11. by   mel1977
    we don't assess??? Heck, I do atleast once an hour! Not only do I pass meds, but I have to assess if there are any adverse reactions-I give a PRN and have to do a one hour post assessment on the med given. I also charge, meaning I do the physical assessments on my patients. I do dressing changes and so forth. Where are these places where LPNs don't do these things?
    My school focused highly on assessment, procedures, drug calculations, med surg, plan of care etc.. with our school as well, we had a math course that went the whole year-Math for meds one and two, pharm one and two. I know so much depends on the state AND facility. Heck, some places won't even HIRE LPNs.
  12. by   augigi
    Quote from TheCommuter
    The only type of facility where LPNs/LVNs are NOT allowed to do the initial assessment is at the acute care hospital. However, LPNs are permitted to do all follow-up assessments in the hospital setting.

    I have spent most of my short nursing career in nursing homes and LVNs are legally allowed to do the initial assessment when a patient is admitted to any type of extended care facility.
    I wasn't trying to offend anyone - I have no experience with LPNs personally as we don't have them. However all my NCLEX-RN studying says "RNs cannot delegate assessment".
  13. by   lpn2rnstudent
    Quote from MsLady06
    alot of hospitals are doing this. thats why LPN are not really needed.



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