LPN...not good enough?? - page 6

So, I have been an LPN for the last 5 years and I love what I do. But one of my patients that I've had last week was an RN. Now I do not have anything against RN's at all, but she asked me if I was a... Read More

  1. Visit  alika profile page
    1
    I'm an LPN and damn proud of it. Bring me an RN into my LTC facility and I guarantee us LPN's will run circles around them! We are the ones who make the place run. Our RN's sit behind a desk and do not have any idea what it takes to be a floor nurse with 30+ residents. I do more hands on then they have ever done. Plus I have to deal with the families, Doctors, and Hospice Companies. The only complaint I have is I make way less money for doing twice the Job that Our RN's do!
    SuzieVN likes this.
  2. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    1
    Quote from angikat
    I have been an LPN for 20 years and am currently back in school. I am working towards my RN but hope to make it as far as I can take it! Lol. Anyway I work with some nurse aides who are currently in an RN program. About 3 weeks ago one of the aides was discussing with me a problem he had with another LPN I work with and he said "she needs to back off because before very much longer I will outrank her" I have heard things like this and "just an LPN" more times than I would like to count! I have seen many LPN's that it would be darn hard to "outrank" even if you had a masters in nursing! The one thing this CNA nursing student doesn't have is experience and the LPN he was talking about has lost of it and happens to be one of the best nurses I have met and far better than most RN's I have met. I think this guy has a lot to learn about being a nurse! I can't wait till he meets an old LPN that has to teach him a thing or two when he messes up!
    I was in a LTC place one day, the new supervisor, an MSN, asked me if there were any treatments that she could do, because she wanted to expand her basic skill set. I told her a catheter needed a routine flushing, and gave her everything she needed to do that. Later, she asked me to come into the room, there was a problem she couldn't figure out. What she was trying to do was, with the syringe inserted into the drain tube on the bag, try to force the saline into the bag, which would then enter the tubing, and finally, irrigate the catheter, itself. She told me no matter how much saline she injected, she couldn't get it up into the cather. No lie.

    It's common that an LPN might graduate without having irrigated a cather, for example, due to lack of opportunity in clinicals. But to get to the point of MSN, blows my mind. I've also met more than few RNs that told me they have never started an IV.
    Fiona59 likes this.
  3. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    1
    The ability to start an IV isn't a defining characteristic of a nurse to me.

    I'll admit it, I suck at it. I can practice on every victim (erm, patient) around and I still remain lousy. Now wound vacs, that's a different story!

    Depending on where you work you may never need to start an iv. Many nursing schools don't do iv initiation as parat of the programme because it's a skill that has to be tested and re-certified every time you change facilities (at least in my area)
    lilsnfrn likes this.
  4. Visit  BostonFNP profile page
    0
    Quote from alika
    Our RN's sit behind a desk and do not have any idea what it takes to be a floor nurse with 30+ residents
    Conversely, I am sure you have 110% understanding what they do.
  5. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    0
    RNs in LTC process and enter orders, take verbal orders from the doctors. Look at the lab values. Renews rx (but every LTC I've worked in had their own pharmacy who did it). Take flack from the families.

    The unit clerk makes the appointments, is first line of fire from the families. Every unit clerk I ever worked with passed the family onto the first nurse walking past the desk to get rid of them.
  6. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Quote from Fiona59
    The ability to start an IV isn't a defining characteristic of a nurse to me.

    I'll admit it, I suck at it. I can practice on every victim (erm, patient) around and I still remain lousy. Now wound vacs, that's a different story!

    Depending on where you work you may never need to start an iv. Many nursing schools don't do iv initiation as parat of the programme because it's a skill that has to be tested and re-certified every time you change facilities (at least in my area)
    Starting an IV can be the first step in saving a life, as one example. If such a basic technical ability is not defining of an RN (professional nurse), versus a PN (practical nurse), I'd like to hear your reasons for more and more nursing jobs requiring higher, and higher levels of educations, and advanced degrees, with less and less hands-on practicality? Do you want your nurse to be able to construct a theoretical care plan, or to be able to possibly save your life? Thanks, and by the the way: I am by 'no' means being facetious, or disrespectful.
  7. Visit  BostonFNP profile page
    0
    Quote from SuzieVN

    Starting an IV can be the first step in saving a life, as one example. If such a basic technical ability is not defining of an RN (professional nurse), versus a PN (practical nurse), I'd like to hear your reasons for more and more nursing jobs requiring higher, and higher levels of educations, and advanced degrees, with less and less hands-on practicality? Do you want your nurse to be able to construct a theoretical care plan, or to be able to possibly save your life? Thanks, and by the the way: I am by 'no' means being facetious, or disrespectful.
    Do you need 2-4 years of education to start an IV? Can only nurses perform that task?

    Simple tasks should not define the profession.
  8. Visit  SuzieVN profile page
    0
    Every line of work has its required core tasks, requirements, competencies, credentials, and the like, is all. Interesting to note that RNs are de facto IV certified, by virtue of being licensed (yet they may have never laid eyes on an IV), whereas LPNs have to prove that they are competent with IVs, in theory and in practicum, in order to be IV certified- and even with that, their IV scope is usually much more limited than that of RNs. If you think about it- it's rather...stupid?
  9. Visit  FranEMTnurse profile page
    2
    Quote from Lilmama352
    This happens to me all the time. It shouldn't matter whether I'm an LPN or RN. I worked hard for this title it wasn't given to me. At the end of the day I'm a nurse and that's all that matters.
    ​DITTO!
    Fiona59 and SuzieVN like this.
  10. Visit  andreita1382 profile page
    0
    I get this all the time. When am I going to nursing school ... as if I hadn't because I am an LPN.
  11. Visit  AngelicDarkness profile page
    1
    Reopening an old post because I am an lpn/rpn and now a director of care. We are good enough!
    TNJLPN likes this.
  12. Visit  libran1984 profile page
    0
    Quote from SuzieVN
    Every line of work has its required core tasks, requirements, competencies, credentials, and the like, is all. Interesting to note that RNs are de facto IV certified, by virtue of being licensed (yet they may have never laid eyes on an IV), whereas LPNs have to prove that they are competent with IVs, in theory and in practicum, in order to be IV certified- and even with that, their IV scope is usually much more limited than that of RNs. If you think about it- it's rather...stupid?
    I have often thought of that very thing... why are RNs automatically certified for IV therapy while an LPN is not in many states?

    I'm in an LPN to RN bridge program right now. With regards to nursing classes, I'm only taking 1 new class. Yes, you heard correctly, 1.... O.N.E. new nursing class; and that is a critical care class. The students i'm with are not getting any pertinent IV skills! Yes, they review IV starts more indepth than my LPN program did but not to the extent that these new ASN RNs should be automatically IV certified.

    Thankfully, in my state, LPNs do not have to be IV certified. I'm just flabbergasted that they do in so many other places. This also includes accessing ports! I learned how to access ports in a manner of minutes. See one, do one, teach one! EASY! In most places, accessing a port is left to an RN. Thankfully, my hospital allows the LPN to perform such a task after being checked off- just like an RN.

    Okay, i'm going to stop before i go off rambling even more than I've already started.
  13. Visit  RN2BE2016 profile page
    0
    I noticed once or twice while in the nursing lab as an LPN student that the RN students here ( in Orlando) did actively study how to start, monitor the clients for adverse reactions, and how to discontinue an IV. They had the whole set-up in their labs. Now I can't say for certain if these were A.D.N. students or the concurrent A.D.N.- B.S.N. students ( meaning A.D.N. students working on their B.S.N. degree at the same time). Although I do have my IV Certification I may have only touched 1 IV since becoming IV Certified ( about 10 months ago). Personally I feel that as an LPN becoming IV Certified is a waste of time.

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