Just let me be... - page 4

This is not a rant. This is not meant to cause any trouble. It was just on my heart and I thought I would share. Please feel free to add a line of your own :) Can't you just let me be happy to be... Read More

  1. Visit  jadelpn profile page
    4
    Quote from GrnTea
    Well, as I am fond of saying, anecdote is not the singular of data. I'll see your tales of mahvelous crusty old LPNs bailing the resident or the new RN out one dark and stormy night, and raise you a dozen truly horrifying anecdotes about situations that were mis-read and mishandled by LPNs whose ignorance of physiology, assessment, and intervention was truly breathtaking.

    What I learned of LPNs in my first year out of school from the ones I worked with was that they were completely task-oriented, felt empowered to be mean to patients whose demographics or diagnoses were distasteful to them, they were absolutely uninterested in learning anything new, and were unwilling to take any responsibility for their screw-ups because they weren't in charge and the RN was supposed to take care of problems. Fortunately for my professional development, after that first year I worked for 7 years in an all-RN environment, and the care was exemplary.

    Some years later I had occasion to teach in an LPN-to-ADN program when my ADN program put one together with a large hospital that was phasing out LPNs. The hospital put a boatload of bucks into paying for sixteen LPNs to take this program at no cost to themselves, and was going to give them their years of seniority in their new RN positions to boot. We worked very hard to make this program a success; it was taught at a lower level than the generic students' program, and we offered extra time for tests, free tutoring, extra office hours, review sections... the hospital gave them extra days off for school and all... And what happened?

    You never heard such ******* and moaning about how mean this was, how they didn't want to be RNs, they didn't want the responsibility, this was too much learning, if they wanted to be RNs they'd have done it in the first place, they hate this. So much for opportunity. Of the sixteen, only four or five made it halfway through, and I think only 2 passed NCLEX RN. The others lost their jobs because they were either too stupid to learn or couldn't be bothered to learn what they needed to keep them.

    Generalities? Sure. But no less so than these other rainbows-and-unicorns "we're all on the same team so we're all of the same value." Horsepucky. If that's not you I'm glad to hear it, and I am aware that this is the LPN/LVN forum I'm posting on. But let's not be self-delusional, either.
    Major generalizations. IF I were given the opportunity as above I would certainly be thrilled to do so. I have not, so I can not. Those days are over for a number of LPN's who love their jobs, but "phasing out" is a real threat. We ARE all on the same team. But value is subjective. And 2 different things. Because education is different--as an LPN I am clincally task oriented, and even a BSN is not, then it is safe to say that when one needs a clinical task that they have not a clue how to do, then perhaps you should ask the LPN....because I am sure that they do.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Feb 23, '13 : Reason: TOS/edited quote
    loveoverpride, mc3, Fiona59, and 1 other like this.
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  3. Visit  echoRNC711 profile page
    5
    I have worked both as an LPN and RN and quite honestly there was no difference in how I was treated. How we represent ourselves is often how we are treated whether your in housekeeping,ward clerk,nurse or management.In short we teach people how to treat us.Examine why you feel less than because no one can make us feel small unless we believe what they are saying is true.
    slint, prnqday, Melodies of Legend, and 2 others like this.
  4. Visit  libran1984 profile page
    1
    I really liked the OP's poetic format
    Last edit by libran1984 on Feb 20, '13
    Esme12 likes this.
  5. Visit  Nascar nurse profile page
    3
    Quote from Orange Tree
    I always say that people have a pecking order- just like chickens. We're constantly comparing ourselves to each other to see where we fit in. And often, when we care, we encourage each other to reach "higher". It's nothing to take personally ...it's just the way people are wired.
    This is so true. I remember talking with a close friend the day I obtained my RN after 19 years of feeling put down for being "just a LPN" (By the way - this nurse did have a huge issue with the RN/LPN thing when we first started working together and initially rubbed it in my face. One good screaming fight about respect behind closed doors in a the DON office and we became great friends forever after).

    Anyways I commented on my first RN day that I would never have to feel like I wasn't good enough again now that I had that RN. She said - Sorry, but now you'll just hear that you're not good enough because you don't have a BSN...if you get that you won't be good enough because you don't have an MSN, etc. You really were a great LPN, you'll be a great RN and don't ever LET anyone make you feel different.
  6. Visit  milobust profile page
    0
    I'm an RN and I don't let anyone make me feel like the OP feels so I don't understand why she feels a need to vent if she didn't allow others to put her down. LPNs and RNs have overlapping responsabilities but they are not the same, hence the difference in pay, NCLEX and education. You cannot compare apples to oranges. Finally, if one nurse saved another nurse's bacon once it has nothing to do with one being and LPN and the other being an RN or vice versa, it has everything to do with experience. So all those claiming they saved so and so even though they had more education are missing the point. You saved them because you were more experienced and that has nothing to do with a degree or a license. If the LPNs feel they do exactly the "same" job and can run circles around less experienced RNs and whine about less pay but refuse to go back to school then they really should keep it to themselves because they are the ones deciding to make less pay for the "same" job.
  7. Visit  nikkimodl profile page
    3
    wow....at the end of the day, we ALL save lives!!!! and make a difference whether RN or LPN, ... neither one is easy.....depending on circumstances, some of us may not be fortunate to be able to continue with our education..that is life..I dont think this was crying, more so venting...isn't that what this panel is for? to uplift each other and encourage and lend an ear ( or eyes) wink! I think some of us just take ourselves waaaayyyy too seriously..We are the good guys...Remember that!
    loveoverpride, mc3, and BelleMorteRN like this.
  8. Visit  Bringonthenight profile page
    5
    Quote from GrnTea
    Well, as I am fond of saying, anecdote is not the singular of data. I'll see your tales of mahvelous crusty old LPNs bailing the resident or the new RN out one dark and stormy night, and raise you a dozen truly horrifying anecdotes about situations that were mis-read and mishandled by LPNs whose ignorance of physiology, assessment, and intervention was truly breathtaking.

    What I learned of LPNs in my first year out of school from the ones I worked with was that they were completely task-oriented, felt empowered to be mean to patients whose demographics or diagnoses were distasteful to them, they were absolutely uninterested in learning anything new, and were unwilling to take any responsibility for their screw-ups because they weren't in charge and the RN was supposed to take care of problems. Fortunately for my professional development, after that first year I worked for 7 years in an all-RN environment, and the care was exemplary..
    I think your post was made to intentionally spark more RN vs LPN arguments and to offend LPNs. You don't have to always be rude to get your point across.
  9. Visit  anotherone profile page
    0
    barely read any replies.... i work in acute care with some lpns. i have never been an lpn. where i work lpns have the same pts and responsibilities for the most part . they can only not do a few things that rns can. they get paid A LOT less..... if i were lpn at my facility and wanted to continue to work there , it would be silly not to go back to school if i could afford it ..... the pay difference where i work is huge but the work load isnt ..... i have seen facilities were pt loads and responsibilities between lpns and rns are huge , though
    Last edit by anotherone on Feb 21, '13
  10. Visit  prnqday profile page
    5
    First,your first two paragraphs are just unbelievable. I find it hard to believe that ALL the LPNs you worked with was like this. Second, you taught 16 LPNs in a bridge program who whined and complained, that represents a small amount of LPNs who do not desire to go back to school. I would whine and complain too if someone forced me to go back to school for a degree I have no desire in. I wonder if they had had someone who truly valued LPNs to teach them and motivate them if it would have been a different outcome. Last year, half of the RN graduating class were previous LPNs. Some of us did it because it was required for work and some of us did it for other personal reasons. Grntea, I'm sorry you came across some incompetent and unmotivated LPNS, however I'm sure you have seen your fair share of RN who did not fit the bill either.
    Quote from GrnTea
    Well, as I am fond of saying, anecdote is not the singular of data. I'll see your tales of mahvelous crusty old LPNs bailing the resident or the new RN out one dark and stormy night, and raise you a dozen truly horrifying anecdotes about situations that were mis-read and mishandled by LPNs whose ignorance of physiology, assessment, and intervention was truly breathtaking.

    What I learned of LPNs in my first year out of school from the ones I worked with was that they were completely task-oriented, felt empowered to be mean to patients whose demographics or diagnoses were distasteful to them, they were absolutely uninterested in learning anything new, and were unwilling to take any responsibility for their screw-ups because they weren't in charge and the RN was supposed to take care of problems. Fortunately for my professional development, after that first year I worked for 7 years in an all-RN environment, and the care was exemplary.

    Some years later I had occasion to teach in an LPN-to-ADN program when my ADN program put one together with a large hospital that was phasing out LPNs. The hospital put a boatload of bucks into paying for sixteen LPNs to take this program at no cost to themselves, and was going to give them their years of seniority in their new RN positions to boot. We worked very hard to make this program a success; it was taught at a lower level than the generic students' program, and we offered extra time for tests, free tutoring, extra office hours, review sections... the hospital gave them extra days off for school and all... And what happened?

    You never heard such ******* and moaning about how mean this was, how they didn't want to be RNs, they didn't want the responsibility, this was too much learning, if they wanted to be RNs they'd have done it in the first place, they hate this. So much for opportunity. Of the sixteen, only four or five made it halfway through, and I think only 2 passed NCLEX RN. The others lost their jobs because they were either too stupid to learn or couldn't be bothered to learn what they needed to keep them.

    Generalities? Sure. But no less so than these other rainbows-and-unicorns "we're all on the same team so we're all of the same value." Horsepucky. If that's not you I'm glad to hear it, and I am aware that this is the LPN/LVN forum I'm posting on. But let's not be self-delusional, either.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Feb 23, '13 : Reason: edited quote
  11. Visit  Paul'in'FL profile page
    0
    LPN's know the "how to".

    RN's know the "why".

    *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~ *~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~


    (......and if I ever ask an LPN about becoming an RN, it is because s/he seems to be bright and motivated. It is a complement, not a critique)
  12. Visit  BelleMorteRN profile page
    0
    Can't you just let me be happy to be a LPN?
    Is that too much to ask?
    Just because there is no R in my initials, I'm not nurse enough for you?
    But the pants are still too big for me to fill you say.
    Can't you just let me be proud to be an LPN?

    So it sounds like you want to be a happy LPN, but people won't let you...
    Are they bullying you?
  13. Visit  Fiona59 profile page
    5
    Quote from GrnTea
    Well, as I am fond of saying, anecdote is not the singular of data. I'll see your tales of mahvelous crusty old LPNs bailing the resident or the new RN out one dark and stormy night, and raise you a dozen truly horrifying anecdotes about situations that were mis-read and mishandled by LPNs whose ignorance of physiology, assessment, and intervention was truly breathtaking.

    What I learned of LPNs in my first year out of school from the ones I worked with was that they were completely task-oriented, felt empowered to be mean to patients whose demographics or diagnoses were distasteful to them, they were absolutely uninterested in learning anything new, and were unwilling to take any responsibility for their screw-ups because they weren't in charge and the RN was supposed to take care of problems. Fortunately for my professional development, after that first year I worked for 7 years in an all-RN environment, and the care was exemplary.

    Some years later I had occasion to teach in an LPN-to-ADN program when my ADN program put one together with a large hospital that was phasing out LPNs. The hospital put a boatload of bucks into paying for sixteen LPNs to take this program at no cost to themselves, and was going to give them their years of seniority in their new RN positions to boot. We worked very hard to make this program a success; it was taught at a lower level than the generic students' program, and we offered extra time for tests, free tutoring, extra office hours, review sections... the hospital gave them extra days off for school and all... And what happened?

    You never heard such ******** and moaning about how mean this was, how they didn't want to be RNs, they didn't want the responsibility, this was too much learning, if they wanted to be RNs they'd have done it in the first place, they hate this. So much for opportunity. Of the sixteen, only four or five made it halfway through, and I think only 2 passed NCLEX RN. The others lost their jobs because they were either too stupid to learn or couldn't be bothered to learn what they needed to keep them.

    Generalities? Sure. But no less so than these other rainbows-and-unicorns "we're all on the same team so we're all of the same value." Horsepucky. If that's not you I'm glad to hear it, and I am aware that this is the LPN/LVN forum I'm posting on. But let's not be self-delusional, either.
    Up until the above, I'd always enjoyed reading your comments.


    Where I live your post would be considered hate speech.

    Over the years I've spend reading this forum, I've really started wondering about the American educational system. It seems that every student in the RN educational stream (be it College or University) is almost a "perfect 4.0 GPA) yet many, many write at below a grade 9 level. Many of the PN students sound functionally illiterate (and this was before the mainstream use of textspeak).

    People do what they can afford to do educationally. I work with LPNs who have degrees that weren't transferable to the Canadian educational system, they didn't have four years to spend to become RNs, so they became LPNs. I know of one woman who has a Masters in Marine Biology and is a lousy LPN. I've worked with Russian MDs who became diploma RNs because of finances and educational issues.

    They manage to work within their scope and nobody has problems.

    In fact, LPNs with decades of experience have told me this problem has only really become an issue since the decision to have an all degree RN entry requirement and with an influx of American educated nurses to some areas of my province.

    I think people need to grow up and bottle the vitrol.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Feb 23, '13 : Reason: edited quote/TOS
  14. Visit  mazy profile page
    3
    I'm a happy LPN and I understand the sentiment of the OPs post. I don't like the way it was presented. It does come across as whine-y to write what seems like a sonnet about why "I'm sorry you don't like me because..." and then to make it seem like one is being victimized by certain perceptions from another group, which then serves to make belittling generalizations about the group that you are complaining about.

    I have had experiences where RNs have looked down on me, or it could be CNAs or other LPNs, but every where you go you can find someone who is going to look down on you for one reason or another. More often it's an issue with the general public being unimpressed, and what can you do about that? There's not much I can do except to make it a point to treat the people around me with respect for the jobs they do; wherever that job lands them in the hierarchy of healthcare, we're a team.

    I'm also out there in the world daring to exist as a "woman of a certain age." Talk about feeling looked down upon. Life isn't fair. You do the best you can to be the best person you can be and try not let it get to you -- live by example and treat others with respect.
    Last edit by mazy on Feb 21, '13 : Reason: to add
    catlvr, slint, and Fiona59 like this.


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