CNA instructor - page 2

I am teaching a new CNA class. This program is new at the school where it is taking place. The issue that I'm having is that the class contains a fair amount of students that do not speak English... Read More

  1. Visit  Melodies of Legend profile page
    1
    Maybe you can post a powerpoint of the things you're going to say and key terms a couple days before the class. Make it mandatory that the students read it and then look up/e-mail you any terms they do not understand. If your program requires a textbook, make it mandatory to read the pages you're going to cover and look up unfamiliar terminology. That way the students will have their questions ready before class and hopefully you can spare 5-10 minutes before class that they can ask you these questions.

    I know it's hard, but it will make your students more marketable when they're out searching for jobs. Furthermore, it promotes safety to ensure your students can understand the procedures you're teaching and understand their clients.

    Hope that helps! Good luck and don't give up.
    eyesopen_mouthshut likes this.
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  3. Visit  eyesopen_mouthshut profile page
    0
    Quote from man-nurse2b
    don't know what the "that's me being nice" comment is about, but its obvious you are not the right person for the job.
    With that being said, unless you specifically know the individual or have been put in a similar situation as the OP, please do not give absolutes about OP. Have you been in OP's situation and had students successfully complete the CNA certification test? If so, please advise how you did so, and be helpful to a fellow nurse who is asking for advice on how to help her students be successful.
    Thank you.
  4. Visit  eyesopen_mouthshut profile page
    0
    Quote from Melodies of Legend
    I know it's hard, but it will make your students more marketable when they're out searching for jobs. Furthermore, it promotes safety to ensure your students can understand the procedures you're teaching and understand their clients.
    This is very true! Many hospitals and medical facilities in my state (FLA) have asked me during interviews if I spoke Spanish or Creole (sadly, I do not), and have made it obvious that if I did I would be much more marketable on the job market.
  5. Visit  pookyp profile page
    1
    Here in Florida, you have to pass the TABE test in order to apply to the CNA program.
    eyesopen_mouthshut likes this.
  6. Visit  pkt00 profile page
    0
    How dare you reply in such a negative manner. If you can't say anything nice do not say anything at all. I am already upset with myself for even replying to your ignorant comment. Smh I never knew this website was based on negativity than positive.
  7. Visit  pkt00 profile page
    0
    Thank you to everyone for your advice except for that one individual but anyway the students may or may not be able to take the exam in their language but if they can perfect.......BUT what will happen when they obtain employment. I have asked to set a meeting with the director to see what can be done. Once again thx for the advice and I'll keep everyone posted
  8. Visit  eyesopen_mouthshut profile page
    0
    Best of luck at your meeting, let us know what happens!
  9. Visit  dt70 profile page
    0
    If the cna class is a continued ed program, there most likely is a esl class available there.
    The error is not on the instructor or students. The school should have hired a spanish speaking, or bilingual instructor for
    a class lacking English speaking skills. Or the school should have directed the students to have taken esl class first.
    Bilingual requirements usually require English as one of the languages, depending on the part of the country it may be
    neccesary in the end.

    Either way. Good luck
  10. Visit  kalevra profile page
    0
    I fully support your proposal that the non-english speaking students have to take an ESL class. I mean really now, the ability to communicate in English should be mandatory. If we require school children to speak/read/write in English then so should ancillary staff working on patients.

    This is a NO BRAINER.
  11. Visit  Kooky Korky profile page
    0
    Quote from Bruce_Wayne
    I would be a jerk about it. If they would have been better suited being taught in another language then they should have signed up for a class taught in that language.

    The only thing I think I would do is initiate a rule where students may not interrupt lecture to ask questions and to save questions for designated times at designated stopping points in the lecture.

    In a perfect world, a student should be familiar with the vocabulary of the daily lecture because they would have seen the same words in the reading assignments they did before the lecture. Students can read the required reading at their own pace and look up any words they don't know in a glossary or dictionary.
    Well, you are the one who said "jerk". How does your plan help anyone - students, future patients, or their teacher?
  12. Visit  Kooky Korky profile page
    0
    Quote from kalevra
    I fully support your proposal that the non-english speaking students have to take an ESL class. I mean really now, the ability to communicate in English should be mandatory. If we require school children to speak/read/write in English then so should ancillary staff working on patients.

    This is a NO BRAINER.
    In theory, it's a no-brainer. In reality, "should" doesn't cut it. Do you have any practical suggestions for the OP?
  13. Visit  Kooky Korky profile page
    0
    Maybe the local church can help. Where I live, war refugees were brought in by the local parish and put to work as CNA's. They all spoke good English, which makes me think they learned English growing up in their original country. But maybe not. Maybe the religious leaders in their own community can help, can see to it that the students learn ESL.

    I think your Admin at the school needs to be made aware of the language problem if they are not already aware. Also, how do other teachers handle this problem?

    You might have to go public, go to future employers of these students, go to whoever licenses the school where you teach. Anonymously, of course.
  14. Visit  Kooky Korky profile page
    1
    Quote from man-nurse2b
    don't know what the "that's me being nice" comment is about, but its obvious you are not the right person for the job. Prometric does have options for taking the CNA in written portion in Spanish. More than likely, the school either needs someone who speaks their language or one can try to become more innovative at teaching. I bet $100 than there is a dual speaker in your class, have you even bothered to ask them? Have you consulted your boss for a translator? have you exhausted all resources to be able to teach?

    https://www.prometric.com/en-us/clie...WebVersion.pdf
    What if the language the students speak is not Spanish?
    CP2013 likes this.


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