Uk midwifery registration is it worthless for the USA??

  1. Hi, i know that as a Uk nurse you can do an extra 18 months to qualify you as a midwife, i know that they dont do it that way in the USA, you have to be a nurse first before going onto do midwife training, rather than doing direct entry like we can here. However is our midwifery training worth anything over there or do you have to do the whole thing all over again, just some im querying. Thanks in advance for all your replys...
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  2. 9 Comments

  3. by   RGN1
    The only way you can nurse in the USA from the UK is if you have a general training that includes paeds, maternity, psychiatry, medical, surgical & community. I would think that if you then went on to become a midwife I would expect that you would be able to work in labour & delivery in the USA because of that experience.
  4. by   Nurse2BMonique21
    ok thanks for that xx
  5. by   madwife2002
    Worthless to me. I am an RN/RM and have degree in Midwifery, might as well not have it.

    Oh yes in the UK if you are an RN you can do the add on course of 18 months and be dual qualified.
    If you are a direct entry midwife thats what you are a 'midwife' and cannot nurse patients-this sometimes becomes a problem especially when mums become unwell in their pregnancy.
  6. by   madwife2002
    [quote=madwife2002]Worthless to me. I am an RN/RM and have degree in Midwifery, might as well not have it.

    Oh yes in the UK if you are an RN you can do the add on course of 18 months and be dual qualified. You can train to be a midwife here in the USD I think Florida is one of the states where you can do that.
    If you are a direct entry midwife thats what you are a 'midwife' and cannot nurse patients-this sometimes becomes a problem especially when mums become unwell in their pregnancy.
  7. by   RGN1
    Did you want a job in Labour/delivery but couldn't get one then??

    I know some states do have RN/Midwives - my friend had 3 of her 4 children delivered in the US by RN/midwives - it was a new thing then in CA but her eldest is 15 now!
  8. by   Owain Glyndwr
    Quote from Nurse2BMonique21
    Hi, i know that as a Uk nurse you can do an extra 18 months to qualify you as a midwife, i know that they dont do it that way in the USA, you have to be a nurse first before going onto do midwife training, rather than doing direct entry like we can here. However is our midwifery training worth anything over there or do you have to do the whole thing all over again, just some im querying. Thanks in advance for all your replys...
    There's a bit of info on the CNM bit of this website, and on the link below

    http://allnurses.com/forums/f254/mid...ed-179805.html

    Cheers

    OG
  9. by   danissa
    [QUOTE=madwife2002;1840969]
    Quote from madwife2002
    Worthless to me. I am an RN/RM and have degree in Midwifery, might as well not have it.

    If you are a direct entry midwife thats what you are a 'midwife' and cannot nurse patients-this sometimes becomes a problem especially when mums become unwell in their pregnancy.
    madwife, as a direct entry midwife, I have nursed (in the past, as now I am NICU) a whole lot of ill ante and post natal mothers,direct entry did not make a difference, if you are the midwife you will treat the patient!
  10. by   madwife2002
    [quote=danissa;1943690]
    Quote from madwife2002

    madwife, as a direct entry midwife, I have nursed (in the past, as now I am NICU) a whole lot of ill ante and post natal mothers,direct entry did not make a difference, if you are the midwife you will treat the patient!

    Did you not have to do further courses?
    In my trust 'nurse' midwives had to look after the poorlies as they required nursing care not midwifery care, but if the direct midwives had done further courses then they could undertake the care
  11. by   danissa
    [QUOTE=madwife2002;1943863]
    Quote from danissa


    Did you not have to do further courses?
    In my trust 'nurse' midwives had to look after the poorlies as they required nursing care not midwifery care, but if the direct midwives had done further courses then they could undertake the care
    No madwife2002, only further courses were cannulation etc, but nothing more intense that I can think of! Have been in neonatal for 6 yrs now, but I think it's just the same, now as the older midwives are retiring or leaving, more and more in the workforce are direct entry, and we have teams, so whoever is on shift for that team will look after their own patients.
    Just noticed, my post times always look like I'm posting in the wee early hours,(in scotland!), time difference is a strange thing, isn't it?--- SOO not important, but just my dazzling thought for the moment
    Last edit by danissa on Nov 28, '06

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