HIPPA is a joke. - page 2

by rickbar

6,081 Views | 33 Comments

There are two parts to HIPPA. The part the public and the health care industry fret about is the "private information" part. However, the second part of HIPPA is never mentioned. Welcome to the world of bogus law making. HIPPA... Read More


  1. 0
    I was under the impression that currently insurers have to cover you for everything. Meaning that they can no longer not cover any pre-existing condition. And your rate of insurance is the same as mine in a group policy. They can't up your rate for a pre-existing condition. If insurance B gets info from insurance A and then insurance B chooses to call your employer to determine you a higher risk, then that goes beyond HIPAA, and into sharing your health information without your consent to a third party.
    However, most places of employment in nursing require you to fill out health forms where they ask you a number of health related questions. And I would suppose that your risk of employment would be evaluated through that. Were you specifically denied a job that was previously offered to you based on the fact of an illness/condition? Many facilities say that they are not discriminitory but they ask all sorts of questions that could get you to share a lot more information regarding your health than one would like.
    And the portibility part of HIPAA, when one signs that form that says one "understands" HIPAA, gives away a lot of rights.
  2. 0
    Quote from jadelpn
    I was under the impression that currently insurers have to cover you for everything. Meaning that they can no longer not cover any pre-existing condition. And your rate of insurance is the same as mine in a group policy. They can't up your rate for a pre-existing condition. If insurance B gets info from insurance A and then insurance B chooses to call your employer to determine you a higher risk, then that goes beyond HIPAA, and into sharing your health information without your consent to a third party.
    However, most places of employment in nursing require you to fill out health forms where they ask you a number of health related questions. And I would suppose that your risk of employment would be evaluated through that. Were you specifically denied a job that was previously offered to you based on the fact of an illness/condition? Many facilities say that they are not discriminitory but they ask all sorts of questions that could get you to share a lot more information regarding your health than one would like.
    And the portibility part of HIPAA, when one signs that form that says one "understands" HIPAA, gives away a lot of rights.
    They can't "up" your rate. They can "advise" the Boss what kind of increase will be coming.
  3. 7
    HIPAA was sponsored by Republican Senator Kassebaum, signed into law by Clinton in 1996, and went into effect during the Bush administration in 2003. The law has been amended several times since its creation. If there are things in it that you don't like, there is plenty of blame to go around.
  4. 9
    Quote from rickbar
    I never said the Obama admin. is right wing. However, one only has to look at his history on trade policy to see that his admin. is business friendly. Hipaa was passed under Clinton, however, it was the Bush admin. that allowed insurance company's to share info. That was sold to the public as "greater privacy," it was not.
    I have the distinct feeling that you do not actually care about HIPAA but are only utilizing the bill as a vehicle to spout anti Republican rhetoric. No where do you mention that 194 Democrat Congressmen voted for the bill and it was signed into law by the Democrat President Bill Clinton.
  5. 2
    Quote from Asystole RN
    ...Democrat Congressmen..Democrat President Bill Clinton.

    The adjective is "Democratic," as in "Democratic congressmen" and "Democratic president Bill Clinton."

    It's considered pejorative to use the noun as a verb in this context. (And yes, my capitalization of "congressmen" and "president" is correct. )

    While the HIPAA bill was sponsored by Republican Nancy Kassebaum in the Senate, it was sponsored by Republican Bill Archer in the House. There were 25 co-sponsors of the bill in the House, and if there were any Democrats among them, I don't recognize the names.
    Sisyphus and GrnTea like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from Tragically Hip
    The adjective is "Democratic," as in "Democratic congressmen" and "Democratic president Bill Clinton."

    It's considered pejorative to use the noun as a verb in this context. (And yes, my capitalization of "congressmen" and "president" is correct. )
    He didn't use it as a verb and why is it perjorative?
  7. 0
    Oops, I meant as an adjective. Editing time has passed, so unless an admin fixes it, it will stand.

    "American" is a adjective. "America" is a noun. You wouldn't say "America congressman" because it's grammatically incorrect. Likewise for "Democratic" versus "Democrat." Not only is it grammatically incorrect, but if you watch political folks interviewed on TV or listen to them on talk radio, you'll notice that using "Democrat" has become a clear insult to Democrats. It saves from having to use more adjectives, such as "unpatriotic" or "stupid." It's a dog-whistle word.

    "The Democrat Party" doesn't really sound right, does it?
  8. 2
    Quote from Tragically Hip
    Oops, I meant as an adjective. Editing time has passed, so unless an admin fixes it, it will stand.

    "American" is a adjective. "America" is a noun. You wouldn't say "America congressman" because it's grammatically incorrect. Likewise for "Democratic" versus "Democrat." Not only is it grammatically incorrect, but if you watch political folks interviewed on TV or listen to them on talk radio, you'll notice that using "Democrat" has become a clear insult to Democrats. It saves from having to use more adjectives, such as "unpatriotic" or "stupid." It's a dog-whistle word.

    "The Democrat Party" doesn't really sound right, does it?
    Democrat was used as a literary flourish to delineate the political party of the subject, as to not be confused with an alternative form of democracy.

    To say that the use of the term "Democrat" is pejorative in nature while describing a Democrat strikes me as wholly ridiculous. If one were to simply read the context of the use of the term then one would see that it's meaning was entirely free of negative intention.

    Thank you for your efforts on policing the grammar here on Allnurses, although a substantive response to the subject of the post would have been appreciated greater.
    rn/writer and psu_213 like this.
  9. 4
    The debate is way off topic. Please, let's get back to what the OP was talking about, o.k.??

    Thanks.
    ECCRN1996, kakamegamama, Sparrowhawk, and 1 other like this.
  10. 4
    Final warning. Keep to the topic.
    ECCRN1996, kakamegamama, Sparrowhawk, and 1 other like this.


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