Did you have more stress FREE TIME after you graduated? What did you do? - page 2

by Laurenslovely 4,783 Views | 28 Comments

I'm just curious... I never thought the end would be near ((2 weeks-- then preceptorship!!)) I've sacrificed taking care of myself (mentally and physically) SO MUCH in nursing school. Did life get better for you when nursing... Read More


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    Quote from champagnesupeRNova
    Working as a nurse is no walk in the park, but I was wayyyyyy more stressed in school. You're under CONSTANT pressure in school and you have no down time because there's always something to do like care plans, studying, homework, projects, etc. At least with work you don't have any work responsibilities when you get back home. I, too, felt like a prisoner being released from jail when I graduated. It was like a huge monkey, no--gorilla-- was lifted off my back.

    Life is definitely better. Enjoy it!
    Thank you! Yay... That is SO good to hear! I'm so ready to be out of this never ending program!!! I forgot what life is like w/o this stress! Praying to be done-- in a few weeks!!! :}
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    In my own experience, I thought the same thing that the stress would be over, but after school ended and the real job began, it was a new kind of stress. My first job was in the hospital, but in a small unit with subacute patients on night shift, so after orientation and I learned to do things my own way, about 6 months in, it wasn't as stressful and I was more comfortable. I am now on a new unit about 2 months in on orientation again and I'm way stressed. This is a large unit and very fast paced, you start with 3 or 4 patients and you can have a whole new assignment before the day is over. The stress never seems to end because the learning never stops and there will always be something new to stress about. My best advice is take it as it comes and learn to deal with it and keep your patients safe. I've been a nurse almost 2 years, but I feel like a new grad. My advice would be to get on a med/surg unit and get some good experience. I told myself I never wanted to do floor nursing, but the experience I've gained is irreplaceable, I love it and see myself doing it for a long time. Good luck with the job hunt, I hope you find something great!
    anotherone and Laurenslovely like this.
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    Thank you @ fmxkrazyone. I had a clinical professor tell me you don't really get comfortable for 5 years... So I think what your going through is normal. I was the same, not wanting to work on a med surg floor, but I think it is the most realistic "choice." I guess we we gotta just learn to cope w/ constant stress
    fmxkrazyone likes this.
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    I had a shock. It was like dancing for 4 years and then just stopping cold turkey. Or I could put it in terms of taking some hardcore narcotics and suddenly stopping. I went through withdrawals. Not knowing what to do with myself. Thinking maybe I should read something or study something. Its been almost a year since then and I am having alot of stress free time, or as much as you can have with a 5 month old baby. But with that being said I plan on starting school again in 2 months lol. So I was only out for a year and am already going back to school.
    Laurenslovely likes this.
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    Yes and no. Life after nursing school is a different type of stress. There was definitely a HUGE relief once school was over, but then there was the stress of the NCLEX. Then finding a job afterwards. The market is tough for both new grads and experienced nurses! I was very lucky, I moved to TX because of the military and found a job very quickly. I thank my lucky stars every day for that. Some of my classmates were not as lucky. It took some of them months to find a job.

    Then, there is the actual stress of being a nurse. It's a stressful job. It's also very tough starting out as a new nurse as there is a huge learning curve. There have been days (I work nights, so I sleep during the daytime) where I couldn't sleep because of something being on my mind from work..whatever it may be. That has become less frequent now that I have some experience under my belt (>1.5 years) but it still happens. The test-taking does not stop after the NCLEX. Most, if not all, jobs require job competency exams and yearly competency exams. For my job, I had to take a math test, a medication test and an arrhythmia test before I was able to work the floor. There were others, too. If you decide to get your ACLS, TNCC, PALS (or if your job requires them), that's more studying for you to do. If you decide to go for nationally-recognized nursing certifications...more studying and test-taking. I think you get the idea.
    Laurenslovely likes this.
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    I don't know where you are from, but I am in CA and when I graduated and started applying for jobs and looking for work- that can be horribly stressful and degrading. I am still unemployed (graduated in Dec.) and apply to multiple jobs every day and scour the web for any opportunities. It has been hard to stay positive with all the rejection, just know you have to be patient and persevere. Don't expect anything handed to you that's for sure! Good luck!
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    Quote from plinytheRN
    I don't know where you are from, but I am in CA and when I graduated and started applying for jobs and looking for work- that can be horribly stressful and degrading. I am still unemployed (graduated in Dec.) and apply to multiple jobs every day and scour the web for any opportunities. It has been hard to stay positive with all the rejection, just know you have to be patient and persevere. Don't expect anything handed to you that's for sure! Good luck!
    Hi... I'm in NYC, but I am from CA (bay area). I have a lot of RN friends over there who received their ADN and still don't have jobs years later!! Its hard to believe! I don't think there is very much diff in ADN and BSN, but I hope BSN will help me land something, seeing my friends struggle. All my family is in CA, but I may just stay in NYC to work. I think NY is doing a little better than CA. Don't feel your skills are wasted, you did JUST graduate! I don't have any patience either, but I know I will need it to look for a job. Good luck :}
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    Quote from turnforthenurseRN
    Yes and no. Life after nursing school is a different type of stress. There was definitely a HUGE relief once school was over, but then there was the stress of the NCLEX. Then finding a job afterwards. The market is tough for both new grads and experienced nurses! I was very lucky, I moved to TX because of the military and found a job very quickly. I thank my lucky stars every day for that. Some of my classmates were not as lucky. It took some of them months to find a job.

    Then, there is the actual stress of being a nurse. It's a stressful job. It's also very tough starting out as a new nurse as there is a huge learning curve. There have been days (I work nights, so I sleep during the daytime) where I couldn't sleep because of something being on my mind from work..whatever it may be. That has become less frequent now that I have some experience under my belt (>1.5 years) but it still happens. The test-taking does not stop after the NCLEX. Most, if not all, jobs require job competency exams and yearly competency exams. For my job, I had to take a math test, a medication test and an arrhythmia test before I was able to work the floor. There were others, too. If you decide to get your ACLS, TNCC, PALS (or if your job requires them), that's more studying for you to do. If you decide to go for nationally-recognized nursing certifications...more studying and test-taking. I think you get the idea.
    I do want to take ACLS, PALS, TNCC. A nurse in the ER I was shadowing suggested I take the classes b/c hospitals prefer not to pay to send you and it would be a bonus if I took them on my own. I don't mind continuing education. I hear you on the learning curve. I feel like I've almost graduated and there's so much I don't know!!! I guess you just learn the basics in nursing school. :}
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    At least when you are out of school, your free time feels a little freer. I no longer had thoughts of "you should be studying for that test" during my free time.
    The work during the first year were far more stressful than school. School makes decision making seem so cut-and-dried. Full responsibility, judgement and decision making in ambiguous circumstances were new concepts to learn.
    anotherone likes this.
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    Life after nursing school has a completely different kind of stress. You will have more time at home. It's such a weird feeling since you're used to reading or studying for finals and now you don't have to. Of course you may have reading for the job. This is your chance to pursue new hobbies and catch up with old friends. Plus, these are great ways to relieve some of the job stress you will be experiencing. Acknowledging the fact that you'll have these job stresses will help you mentally prepare for your new career. Best wishes!


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