LTC-What is meant by "The skilled nursing area of LTC"

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    What is meant exactly by "The skilled nursing area of LTC". What would the nurse be doing if she were working in the "Skilled nursing area"? Thanks
  2. 14 Comments so far...

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    The skilled area is the section of the facility where the patients who are having PT,OT,ST and skilled nursing care IV ABT, etc. usually immediately after having a stroke, MI, or surgery for knee/hip replacements, CABG etc. They are usually in the facility for only a few weeks. This is the "money making" area of the facility as opposed to the residential or long term side which is the stable (reasonably so) patients who live there indefinitely. The skilled side is today's equivalent of yesterday's hospital med/surg floor. We get people on the 2nd or 3rd day postop. There could be IV's, Trachs/vents, TPN, traction, BiPap/CPap and these patients are more acutely ill and require frequent assessments.
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    Thank you so very much FLArn. I will study up on these skills.
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    I forgot to add that I am also looking for a good nursing clinical book which would be helpful to use while working in the skilled nursing area at LTC. If anyone knows of any good books that would be helpful in this area. please let me know. Thanks again.
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    Please note that not all patients in Skilled Nursing have to be as acutely ill as described above. Any resident in long term care that cannot care for themselves completely and therefore is not part of the Assisted Living (ALF) portion of such a facility, falls under Skilled Nursing.
    Anne36 and Blackcat99 like this.
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    It's the part of the nursing home where intractable frustration and demands on your time outside all realms of reality reign supreme.
    nervousnurse, Anne36, and Blackcat99 like this.
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    So that's why they suggested I go on the skilled nursing side? It's totally impossible. Yikes!!!!!
  9. 1
    Quote from AngelRN27
    Please note that not all patients in Skilled Nursing have to be as acutely ill as described above. Any resident in long term care that cannot care for themselves completely and therefore is not part of the Assisted Living (ALF) portion of such a facility, falls under Skilled Nursing.
    In Massachusetts, that is not true. We are called a skilled facility because we provide skilled care, but not all residents have what's considered a 'skill'.
    You will learn all sorts of new things working on a short term floor. We've just started to put in our own PICC and MID lines something you'd NEVER do if you worked at a hospital. The business is changing and those facilities and nurses who can change with it are the ones who will thrive.
    Blackcat99 likes this.
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    Quote from CapeCodMermaid
    In Massachusetts, that is not true. We are called a skilled facility because we provide skilled care, but not all residents have what's considered a 'skill'.
    You will learn all sorts of new things working on a short term floor. We've just started to put in our own PICC and MID lines something you'd NEVER do if you worked at a hospital. The business is changing and those facilities and nurses who can change with it are the ones who will thrive.
    I'm not sure what you mean when you state that "not all residents have what's considered a 'skill.'" ... I made no reference the the *residents* having skills LOL. Your response supports mine. I simply meant that not all residents in a SNF are as acutely ill as described above.
    Blackcat99 likes this.
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    What bugs me about facilities that have a "skilled" hall and a "LTC" hall is that I don't see a big difference in staffing between the two. I see the nurses in the skilled hall who have 3rd day post ops, just had a MI, on IV ABX, etc. And they *still* have a ratio of nearly 30:1. I get that the object is to create a less expensive level of care than the hospital. But you can't give a nurse 28 patients and expect him to provide an almost acute level of care. Just not possible.
    sallyrnrrt, nervousnurse, Anne36, and 1 other like this.


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