Happy National Nursing Assistants Week

  1. :hatparty: I hope that all of you other CNA's feel loved and appreciated this week. We work hard and deserve the recognition. :hatparty:
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  2. 11 Comments

  3. by   shel_wny
    I got a free Nursing Assistant t-shirt personalized for our facility!
    Awright!

    Shel
  4. by   moliuchick
    I just got hired by a Nursing Home and I have never worked in the med field before.
    I am a 2nd yr Nursing student and I had only worked in a hosp during our clinical experience.

    I am wondering how do CNAs work in a NH? Do they get order from the RN or do they just take initiation to take care of the patients?
    I know what the CNAs have to do but I don't know how they usually work with the RNs and Drs.

    I am also wondering what 1.5 means? The HR lady told me I am going to have 1.5 for my scheudule, what does that means? I don't think she is referring to time and a half?
    I can probably ask her next week when I see her but if anyone out there knows what she means, please let me know.
  5. by   shel_wny
    Quote from moliuchick
    I just got hired by a Nursing Home and I have never worked in the med field before.
    I am a 2nd yr Nursing student and I had only worked in a hosp during our clinical experience.

    I am wondering how do CNAs work in a NH? Do they get order from the RN or do they just take initiation to take care of the patients?
    I know what the CNAs have to do but I don't know how they usually work with the RNs and Drs.

    I am also wondering what 1.5 means? The HR lady told me I am going to have 1.5 for my scheudule, what does that means? I don't think she is referring to time and a half?
    I can probably ask her next week when I see her but if anyone out there knows what she means, please let me know.
    No idea about the 1.5. I know we have first shift, second shift, and third shift. Perhaps 1.5 is between the first and second? That's just a wild guess. Time and a half would start when you've surpassed your 40 hours for the week. Did she use it in that context? Definitely ask her. You'll have lots of nursing lingo whizz by your ear and in order to learn much of anything at all you have to politely stop the person and ask them what they mean by that.

    As for who a CNA reports to, the CNA typically meets with the LPN or RN for report during the first few hours of the shift. That is when the nurse tells the CNA what to look for in what patient and what to monitor (TPR, behavior, depression, sores, aches, bowel movements, etc). As the CNA you will be spending the most time with the resident and you will be the first to notice a change in their mood, confusion level, a red spot that could turn into decubitis, a bruise, skin tear, and anything else. It takes about 10 minutes and it's the only real communication between nurses and CNAs except for any time during the shift when a resident complains of pain, when the CNA notices a mark or a sore, or when a nurse is needed to do something that the CNA cannot do. Thereafter you know what you need to get done and you do it. You toilet folks, change those who are incontinent, clean them up, get them up, dress them, feed them, bathe them, and do just about anything for them that they cannot do themselves. It's quite challenging and it takes a good bit of multitasking. It's rewarding some days and heartwrenching others. I'm brand new to LTC so I'm not quite sure what to think of it yet. It's very manic. I feel it can only get better as I get used to it all. I just keep telling myself that I'm doing something worthwhile and that I'm helping make their last years a little bit better.

    As for how many CNA's work in a NH...that varies. Ours is supposed to have a 2:20 CNA to resident ratio. That's a big joke. It's closer to 1:20 as we are always understaffed. They staff the first floor well as it's part rehab and the residents are more alert and go home quickly to either badmouth our facility or praise it. I'm on the top floor - the 3rd floor. We're the heaviest floor and for our 60+ residents there are often 3 CNAs, sometimes including floaters.

    I hope that helps. If you have any more question just pm me. I'm pressing for a CNA Corner like the LPN corner because so many posts get mixed in here, in the General Nursing Discussion board, the Student Nurses board, and random others. Hopefully we'll have a tiny spot of our own soon.

    Take care,
    Shel
    Last edit by shel_wny on Jun 17, '04
  6. by   kathy_79
    as i know 1.5 relay to your employee status and benefits which you may or may not to get. you have to find out how many hours you work per week and how many you need to be eligible for benefits.

    good luck to you. beginings are always hard. it is good experience for you as student nurse. i do the same PCT/ student nurse. do not forget ever DOCUMENT and REPORT everything what you're doing and what nurse ask you to do. you safe yourself, accidents always happen and you need to protect yourself too. if pt is able to do something for himself. let it happen: he/she feels better, you have less work. ask for help if you need to, there always tasks where we need other to do them. besides, do not hurt yourself, your health is important also: back injuries are very common in this profesion, so love yourself.
    i hope it helps and wish you the best, kathy
  7. by   Katnip
    Happy Nursing Assistants Week! We couldn't do it without you!
  8. by   Blackcat99
    Happy National Nursing Assistants. A special Thank you for the nursing assistants that work so hard helping the elderly. You are God's special angels and I love you all for all your hard work, patience, devotion and your total dedication. :hatparty: :hatparty: :hatparty:
  9. by   moliuchick
    [QUOTE=shel_wny]No idea about the 1.5. I know we have first shift, second shift, and third shift. Perhaps 1.5 is between the first and second? That's just a wild guess. Time and a half would start when you've surpassed your 40 hours for the week. Did she use it in that context? Definitely ask her. You'll have lots of nursing lingo whizz by your ear and in order to learn much of anything at all you have to politely stop the person and ask them what they mean by that.

    As for who a CNA reports to, the CNA typically meets with the LPN or RN for report during the first few hours of the shift. That is when the nurse tells the CNA what to look for in what patient and what to monitor (TPR, behavior, depression, sores, aches, bowel movements, etc). As the CNA you will be spending the most time with the resident and you will be the first to notice a change in their mood, confusion level, a red spot that could turn into decubitis, a bruise, skin tear, and anything else. It takes about 10 minutes and it's the only real communication between nurses and CNAs except for any time during the shift when a resident complains of pain, when the CNA notices a mark or a sore, or when a nurse is needed to do something that the CNA cannot do. Thereafter you know what you need to get done and you do it. You toilet folks, change those who are incontinent, clean them up, get them up, dress them, feed them, bathe them, and do just about anything for them that they cannot do themselves. It's quite challenging and it takes a good bit of multitasking. It's rewarding some days and heartwrenching others. I'm brand new to LTC so I'm not quite sure what to think of it yet. It's very manic. I feel it can only get better as I get used to it all. I just keep telling myself that I'm doing something worthwhile and that I'm helping make their last years a little bit better.

    As for how many CNA's work in a NH...that varies. Ours is supposed to have a 2:20 CNA to resident ratio. That's a big joke. It's closer to 1:10 as we are always understaffed. They staff the first floor well as it's part rehab and the residents are more alert and go home quickly to either badmouth our facility or praise it. I'm on the top floor - the 3rd floor. We're the heaviest floor and for our 60+ residents there are often 3 CNAs, sometimes including floaters.

    I hope that helps. If you have any more question just pm me. I'm pressing for a CNA Corner like the LPN corner because so many posts get mixed in here, in the General Nursing Discussion board, the Student Nurses board, and random others. Hopefully we'll have a tiny spot of our own soon.

    Take care,
    Shel[/QUOTE

    It is just sad that the stuff to resident ratio is 1:10. How can resident gets good care if the LTC is so understaffed?
    Anyway, I am going to work only 20 hrs per week so I am not going to get benefit for sure. I guess it is okay b/c I will apply for our state health care assistance.
    Thanks for your information.
  10. by   moliuchick
    Quote from kathy_79
    as i know 1.5 relay to your employee status and benefits which you may or may not to get. you have to find out how many hours you work per week and how many you need to be eligible for benefits.

    good luck to you. beginings are always hard. it is good experience for you as student nurse. i do the same PCT/ student nurse. do not forget ever DOCUMENT and REPORT everything what you're doing and what nurse ask you to do. you safe yourself, accidents always happen and you need to protect yourself too. if pt is able to do something for himself. let it happen: he/she feels better, you have less work. ask for help if you need to, there always tasks where we need other to do them. besides, do not hurt yourself, your health is important also: back injuries are very common in this profesion, so love yourself.
    i hope it helps and wish you the best, kathy
    I will not get benefit b/c I only work 20 hrs per week. I have two very young kids and it was extremely hard for me to go to school and work full time for my 1st year of nursing school. I went insane so many times. Lucky that my husband is totally supportive; or else, I think I will quit nursing school in a heart beat. I am glad to know that we are the people who will get to take care of the resident the most. That is great for me b/c I can learn more!
    I am pretty hard working but I will take your advice of taking care of myself first. Thanks for reminding me. I know how it is when you try to help more than you should.
    Thanks for all the great advice. Hope I will like the job.
  11. by   PBAJS
    happy nursing assistants week everyone! i think my facility had some kind of recognition last friday, however, that was my day off and then weekend off.

    shel_wny - referencing your second posting - very well said. however in my facility we rarely receive a report from the lpn or rn. the nurse has said she is too busy and we know what to do. i think that we should get a report at the beginning of our shift to tell us what to look for, what to monitor, which resident is sick and should stay in bed, etc.

    "they staff the first floor well as it's part rehab and the residents are more alert and go home quickly to either badmouth our facility or praise it. i'm on the top floor - the 3rd floor. we're the heaviest floor and for our 60+ residents there are often 3 cnas, sometimes including floaters." - same situation here.

    "i'm pressing for a cna corner like the lpn corner because so many posts get mixed in here, in the general nursing discussion board, the student nurses board, and random others. hopefully we'll have a tiny spot of our own soon."

    i, too, would like to see a forum or topic for cnas. shortly after joining this board, i pm'd or emailed with a suggestion for a forum/topic for cnas. received an answer that it is under consideration. still waiting.

    moderators, please create a forum/topic for cnas. aren't we a specialty too?

    pat53
  12. by   oceanblue
    HAPPY NURSING ASSISTANT'S WEEK!!!!
    You all deserve a pat on the back, we nurse's couldn't do our jobs without you!!
  13. by   jnette
    Quote from oceanblue
    HAPPY NURSING ASSISTANT'S WEEK!!!!
    You all deserve a pat on the back, we nurse's couldn't do our jobs without you!!

    A huge DITTO from me as well ! And lots of well deserved (((HUGS)))

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