Dragging 'em out of bed - page 9

Demented resident - we'll call her Mary - is always cold, often combative with care. She's freezing when she first wakes up. Incontinent of bladder. Her saturated chuck gets nice and warm. ... Read More

  1. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from nightmare
    OMG Daniel O'Donnell !Is he required listening in all LTC's then!:uhoh21: I was once forced to listen to 3 hours of him and only just escaped with my sanity
    I don't know. But I'd like to kill him AND his perky blonde wife.

    ARRRGGGGHHHHH!
  2. by   BoopetteRN
    I have never heard of Daniel O'Donnell, we have Lawrence Welk videos and tapes that the residents listen to, some of the videos I know by heart and actually find myself singing at the med cart when I am doing a team. I have to admit that I enjoy the in-service position, but I really miss working on the floor and volunteer to do so when ever I can. Residents really do respond to music.
  3. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from BoopetteRN
    I have never heard of Daniel O'Donnell, we have Lawrence Welk videos and tapes that the residents listen to, some of the videos I know by heart and actually find myself singing at the med cart when I am doing a team. I have to admit that I enjoy the in-service position, but I really miss working on the floor and volunteer to do so when ever I can. Residents really do respond to music.
    Well, mix up Welk with some O'Donnell. They love him!

    That's me, bouncing at the med cart to Daniel O'Donnell. Oy.
  4. by   nightmare
    Daniel O'Donnell's married!! I thought he was the other way inclined!
  5. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from nightmare
    Daniel O'Donnell's married!! I thought he was the other way inclined!
    Nah. Just one of those slight, gentle Irish guys. Not my type.

    :trout:
  6. by   lovingtheunloved
    Suesquatch, you're so stinkin' cool. I think you should come work with me in the AZ.
  7. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from lovingtheunloved
    Suesquatch, you're so stinkin' cool. I think you should come work with me in the AZ.
    Thanks.

    NW AZ. Mountains? Or desert? We visited Grand Canyon and it was some of the most magnificent country I've ever seen. Like it stops your heart beautiful.
  8. by   bradleau
    We get some of the same type in regular hospitals. I have seldom had much of a problem with very confused patients. I enter the room more like a favorite friend or family, not as a nurse. Our good techs, most of them came from a nursing home environment, do the same thing. NO AUTHORITY figures here. Also we do not push the issue, just come back later. Do not your techs make the rounds and keep this person dry? We round on ours every 2 hrs. That usually takes care of the sopping wet part. Our "warm"
    blankets come from CCU which is down the long hall. But I have had nursing homes put in blanket warmers. Between a beer at bed time and a warm blanket, I did not have problems with any of them. Of course I now have worked many years on Med-Surg. But I do remember my LTC days. One nurse that I work with still talks about running away from nursing home care and the "witch" that ran the place. Best thoughts and wishes with your problem. Maybe YOU will have to do the honors of taking this lady out of bed. With you kindness and good technique it may make the difference for this little old lady. I have done this in the past and still do. It can make a difference.
  9. by   fighter07
    I don't drag them out of bed, I simply say "brush your teeth so you can taste your food better, and getting up of your bed is the best." I don't give extra strenght in doing so, if I broke my back no one can ever pay my pain.
  10. by   pumpkin92356
    If the nurse in charge is ordering the aides to get this lady up regardless then the aides are committing a violation of this residents right to choose. Also the nurse that did this should be removed from this type of work environment. I work with a nurse who plays bulldog with my co-workers when it comes to making residents do things they dont want to do. I told her that a patient refused to get up and I wasnt going to break the rules by forcing her up or in tub etc. Nurse backed off she knew that this was against the residents rights.
  11. by   mercy1975
    Quote from Suesquatch
    Demented resident - we'll call her Mary - is always cold, often combative with care. She's freezing when she first wakes up. Incontinent of bladder. Her saturated chuck gets nice and warm.

    She. will. not. get. up. The other nurse - I will NOT do this - tells the aides to get her up regardless. She's fighting and cursing and an aide ends up hurt and Mary ends up weeping in the nurses' station and asking me, "Why did you let them do this?"

    She thinks she's been beaten up. Well, she kinda has been.

    Now, I know she can't lie in her own waste all day and needs to get up. But how do we do this? (My co-nurse is pissed at me for suggesting that fragging her out of bed isn't the way to go. "They didn't DRAG her out of bed!" Of course they did, numnutz.)

    Any suggestions?
    What time do you get her up?
  12. by   SuesquatchRN
    Quote from mercy1975
    What time do you get her up?
    10, 11.
  13. by   amanda1229
    I personally think I deal very well with residents like this. We have a couple, but one in particular. She refuses to get up for breakfast almost everyday, and gets really delusional and combative when upset. As most dementia residents, your mood affects theirs. I love to walk in and say, "Helloooo, Vivian!" and make her as excited as possible, give her a kiss on the forehead, the brown-noser works. I just start moving her around a bit, and talking to her about her grandkids, or about how nice she looks, and saying lots of "Guess what!" things that go nowhere, just things to make her really excited.

    Sometimes Vivian will get really, really upset, flipping out because she wants to leave (she can be a wanderer sometimes). We have to put her in bed because she goes around and tries to hit residents and staff, and ruin things. When another aide, myself and a nurse get finished putting her back in bed, all of us bruised by now, she's sobbing. I just take her hand and get really close to her face and say, "Oh, no! What did they do to you?" and TOTALLY sympathize with her. Say things like, "These girls are nuts!" I even say, "I tell you what -- you and I are leaving today, when I go home at 2:30!" She calms down, and gets cooperative and says, "I'll see you then!"

    Of course, she forgets, but is nice and well-behaved for the rest of the day!

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