What kind of sign-on bonuses are in your area? - page 2

They're offering all kinds of things for nurses around here to sign even a 2 year contract. Some will offer to pay off your student loans, cash bonuses up to $5,000, lawn care and spa treatments... Read More

  1. by   mauser
    I am starting my diploma program in August. Last year at the open house, we were told the hospital is offering $10,000 sign on bonuses for new grads and will pay for further education. About half of my anatomy class is employed at the hospital in some form or another and are having their tuition paid for by the hospital. I do know that in a city about 1/2 hour from here, they offer up to $15,000 tuition reimbursement. I do not know the committment time for either of these.
  2. by   bonjovigirl
    Alot of hospitals in Philly are offering $20,000 for 2 year contracts.

    oops, I mean 3 years.
    Last edit by bonjovigirl on Jun 6, '04
  3. by   Sheri257
    On a side note, I'm not taking any sign-on bonuses, mostly because I've read too many posts where people didn't like where they worked and regretted signing on for the two year commitment.

    Unless you've actually worked there before (like as an LPN, CNA, etc.) I think it's too risky.

    There's a reason some facilities offer high sign-on bonuses i.e. lousy working conditions.

  4. by   youngRNstudent
    My hospital also does not offer sign on bonuses. I'm a CNA there and plan to stay when I graduate in December. They realize nurses take the bonus, spend their 2 years or whatever there and move on to another hospital. My hospital wants people to stay there because its a great place to work at. (Kind of a yuppy/state-of-the-art hospital!) They offer excellent hourly wage though!
  5. by   cherokeesummer
    Quote from DieTryin'
    Where in Virginia are you? My Fiance is originally from Newport News, and we'll be moving to somewhere in Virginia once we graduate.

    On topic: I found that the Sentara network of hospitals will pay new grads relocation costs, as well as pay off $15,000 in student loans if you sign a three year contract.
    Hey! I'm going to school in Newport News!
  6. by   Blackcat99
    Quote from youngRNstudent
    My hospital also does not offer sign on bonuses. I'm a CNA there and plan to stay when I graduate in December. They realize nurses take the bonus, spend their 2 years or whatever there and move on to another hospital. My hospital wants people to stay there because its a great place to work at. (Kind of a yuppy/state-of-the-art hospital!) They offer excellent hourly wage though!
    It sounds like your hospital has a brain!!! Yes people will want to stay at a hospital that is a great place to work and has good wages. I wonder why the other places haven't figured this out yet. It seems that the ones advertising sign on bonuses have ads constantly in the newspaper.
  7. by   MrsCannibal
    [QUOTE=lizz]On a side note, I'm not taking any sign-on bonuses, mostly because I've read too many posts where people didn't like where they worked and regretted signing on for the two year commitment.

    Unless you've actually worked there before (like as an LPN, CNA, etc.) I think it's too risky.

    There's a reason some facilities offer high sign-on bonuses i.e. lousy working conditions.

    I never thought of it like that before...I guess I just assumed I would take a bonus to cover my relocation expenses because we planned on moving out-of-state when I graduate. Now I will think twice about it!
  8. by   chris_at_lucas_RN
    If you accept a sign-on bonus and decide you don't want to stay, my understanding is you return the sign-on bonus and be on your way.

    In the United States, no one can make you work where you don't want to work, etc.

    There should be provisions in the employment contract for "what if's." Ask about them.

    Me, I like the fact that I can actually pay off bills with money, so sign-on bonuses are interesting. Just wish I'd gotten student loans to pay for school. The offer of paying those off doesn't help me--I went into hock on my credit card!

  9. by   Sheri257
    Quote from chris_at_lucas
    If you accept a sign-on bonus and decide you don't want to stay, my understanding is you return the sign-on bonus and be on your way.

    In the United States, no one can make you work where you don't want to work, etc.

    There should be provisions in the employment contract for "what if's." Ask about them.
    True, although some people have been blacklisted for doing that. At least, that's what I've read on this board. They said they tried to find work at other facilities which, little did they know, were operating under a different name, but were owned by the same company --- which wouldn't hire them because they backed out of the previous contract.

    And, of course, what if you've already spent the money and can't pay it back? Which, apparently, happens in a lot of cases. Then you're stuck with the two years.

    I still think it's too risky unless, of course, you really need the money. Although after taxes, it may not be as much as people think. I may be wrong, but I believe these bonuses are also taxed at a higher rate.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jun 7, '04

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