Vaccination Waiver Please Help Quick!! - page 3

by HHagedorn 3,728 Views | 29 Comments

I was just informed that our clinical rotation that we start in 4 weeks has just started requiring nursing students to get the flu vaccine. Can someone please help me find the right waiver documentation to get out of it?! I only... Read More


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    My system requires flu shot, if you plead medical exemption you must have a note from PCP on file; if for religious reasons you must have a note from your religious leader preferably citing exactly why it is outside the bounds of your belief to get one.

    Please think about your patients. And I have to correct the above poster about severely immunocompromised pts having reverse airflow...I work with neutropenic pts all the time and we do take special precautions, but this is not one of them. Also keep in mind that some of these pts can have their WBC/ANC be okay, then suddenly tank in response to therapy given days ago. In an ideal world, we'd always have up to date info on our pts and be able to anticipate that, but it doesn't always happen.
    SnMrsSmiley likes this.
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    Quote from SweetseRN
    I feel that this post is almost intentionally borderline inflammatory. You are saying you are going to go into PICU/NICU and won't take a flu vaccine? Really? I got my first ever flu shot, voluntarily, before my OB clinical rotation because I felt it was my responsibility to protect the new babies and moms. I think you need to examine your priorities if you really want to be a nurse.

    exactly. In this situation the poster is being reckless. I just dont agree with it.
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    Or just not work in a hospital with an already vulnerable population....
    I whole heartedly agree that the best way to prevent illness is to eat a proper diet, exercise, and wash those hands over and over again. Heck, my first year of clinicals was my healthiest. Not one sick day. Caught a cold the week of finals: (
    I would never say no to a request for a vaccination. Why? Because they are safe and pretty effective. What are you going to tell your patients when they need to be educated on getting there flu shot?
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    To my knowledge, in previous years, the H1N1 is not included in the standard flu vaccine.

    Many hospitals prefer the injectible vaccine for current employees, that are currently employed, d/t issues with the vaccine type.

    As far as avoiding vaccination. In most schools, you will have a variety of facilities that you go to. The problem arises that more than one will probably have this requirement. Finding a school that can negotiate a student out of this requirement repeatedly, or that will even make the attempt is quite unlikely.

    The other issue is when you graduate. You will find that how you feel on the matter of vaccines does not matter - what the facility "feels" or what the facility has evidence based data on does matter. Many hire/employ nurses and put lifestyle restrictions on them, fair or not. With an issue, that does affect pt safety, you may find a harder time getting a job after graduation, without vaccination.
    SnMrsSmiley and elkpark like this.
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    Quote from SweetseRN
    I feel that this post is almost intentionally borderline inflammatory. You are saying you are going to go into PICU/NICU and won't take a flu vaccine? Really?
    Thankfully, the OP's stance is becoming increasingly rare and justifiably marginalized. However, there are still some holdouts.

    I started attending nursing school in 2009 and the "anti-vaccine" craze was still going pretty strong. I remember quite a few classmates swearing up and down they would never get flu shots because they were pretty sure vaccines caused autism. It was, by today's standards, quite insane.

    I remember a few of them confronting an instructor about it during lecture and he was simply having none of it. He quite flatly stated the anti-vaccine movement was ridiculous. You got vaccinated to protect your patients (and keep the school's hard to obtain clinical sites) and if you were not interested in that for any reason you were free to leave at any time.

    Class discussion over.

    Two years later, I notice none of those same people saying anything of the sort against vaccines. Even though a couple are still nutjob enough to believe it, they have been marginalized to the point they won't talk about it openly and hopefully not with patients.
    ChelseaLynn1623 likes this.
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    To the OP, I don't know if you're aware of the rules that apply to having an immunization waiver. In Michigan, when you sign a waiver and if there is one person in your facility (school or place of employment) that has a confirmed diagnosis of a disease for which a waiver was signed, you will be not be allowed in the facility for any activity (work, school, sports) for three weeks from the date of that confirmed diagnosis.

    You may want to check the laws in your state because if you are exposed to one of those diseases for which you chose to not be vaccinated, you may be risking the ability to complete a clinical rotation.
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    In my experience, healthcare facilities are a lot stricter about students than they are about their own employees. With employees, there are all sorts of labor laws and due process requirements to consider when mandating different types of vaccinations, etc. There is no requirement for facilities to accept students to begin with, so they feel much freer to just refuse to accept any student(s) who are balking at their policies. And, if you can't complete your clinical rotations because the clinical facilities won't accept you, you can't finish nursing school.
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    I would ask your school. I waived all vaccinations and simply had to sign a paper.
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    Quote from elkpark
    In my experience, healthcare facilities are a lot stricter about students than they are about their own employees. With employees, there are all sorts of labor laws and due process requirements to consider when mandating different types of vaccinations, etc. There is no requirement for facilities to accept students to begin with, so they feel much freer to just refuse to accept any student(s) who are balking at their policies. And, if you can't complete your clinical rotations because the clinical facilities won't accept you, you can't finish nursing school.
    I would agree with this. The hospitals where your college has clinical sites are concerned with their bottom line and that includes reducing their infection rates. They don't care about whether OP gets the flu. What they care about is the potential for OP to spread the flu within their facility. OP is not an employee and the facilities are not required to offer OP a clinical placement.

    OP, all the handwashing in the world isn't going to prevent you from catching the flu from the guy in line at the grocery store who coughs right in your face. You may not get all that ill, but before you even know you are, there are many potential ways you can spread influenza through the immunocompromised newborns and others in your clinical location.

    The rule is all about the patients.
    SnMrsSmiley likes this.
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    Quote from mama_d
    And I have to correct the above poster about severely immunocompromised pts having reverse airflow...I work with neutropenic pts all the time and we do take special precautions, but this is not one of them. Also keep in mind that some of these pts can have their WBC/ANC be okay, then suddenly tank in response to therapy given days ago. In an ideal world, we'd always have up to date info on our pts and be able to anticipate that, but it doesn't always happen.
    Sorry - that was not very clear of me at all. I wasn't trying to make up my own definition of severe immune compromise. ACIP guidelines, which are reflected in the FAQ's on the immunize.org link, state that providers may receive the LAIV unless they care for severely immunocompromised patients in a protected (reverse air flow) environment. I agree that there are patients outside of these environments with significant infection risk - no matter how we refer to them - but their nurses can receive Flumist per these guidelines.


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