Questions for Nursing Students - page 3

I would like your opinion on some questions, so I can get a nursing student point of view! I am new to teaching nursing students, and desperately want to do a good job. I've received good reviews... Read More

  1. by   firstyearstudent
    Quote from scribblerrn
    I would like your opinion on some questions, so I can get a nursing student point of view! I am new to teaching nursing students, and desperately want to do a good job. I've received good reviews from students so far, but fresh ideas would be great.

    Please provide me with constructive criticism. I'm sure all of you have dealt with crummy nursing instructors (so have I), but don't think of them, when you answer the questions. Think about the ones that really helped you and made a difference.

    1. What have your clinical instructors done to enhance your learning during clinicals? Especially clinicals that didn't offer much in the way of practicing skills ( such as low chance for IV's, dressings, etc).

    2. What techniques have your teachers used to help lecture be less boring, but still provide you with the needed information?

    3. What would you like us (meaning nursing instructors) to know that would help you excel in your learning?

    4. This is just something I have wondered, but never asked any of my students... As you can see from my info, I'm pretty young compared to most nursing instructors and I look younger than what I really am. Someimes I see it as a positive, other times as a hindrance. What would be some of your FIRST impressions of a nursing instructor who was young? Meaning, what things roll across your mind when you walk into that first class or your first clinical and the person who says she is your instructor looks like she barely graduated high school, much less college? I feel very confident in my knowledge level and ability, but I do get some odd looks in the beginning and have always wondered, "What they are thinking?"
    During a clinical with little opportunity for new procedures, great post-conference can really make up for it. I have always enjoyed seminar type teaching and this is a choice opportunity. The instructor could use things that actually happened or scenarios suggested by things that have gone one. For instance, "Okay, everyone. You just come into the room to assess your patient and they're lying face down on the floor. What's the first thing you do?" Then get and evaluate responses in a positive way. Another good thing to do during clinicals that are slow is to give equipment demonstrations. "Have you ever used a doppler? Let's get one and see how it works." I have even gone to the supply room with my instructor and had her go over stuff I had questions about. "What are these big glass bottles for?"

    Less boring lecture? It's a tightrope. You want to provide opportunities for group work ("Let's get in groups and do case studies, then present them") and for student comments ("I had an aunt with lupis and she ...."), on the hand there is a lot of material to be covered and not much time. In one of our classes the instructor had the class break into groups and each group research, prepare and present the lecture on a chapter from the textbook. This was interesting and good experience. We also do "Jeopardy" to review for tests and exams. It can be a lot of fun.

    I would like the instructors to know that each of us only has a certain amount of time to dedicate to studying and we have other commitments in our life. Arrange the class so that you can dedicate whatever time you have. For instance, provide summaries and power point notes that provide the minimum you need for to pass so that those who don't have time to read the text still have a shot. In clinicals I would like the instructor to know that you can command respect and criticize students without terrifying them or humilate them.

    My first impression of a very young instructor would be that she (or he) did not have a lot of experience and might not have the nursing or teaching skills required to lead a group of students. That said, I think I would quickly be won over by a confident display of knowledge and fairness in treatment of students.
  2. by   WDWpixieRN
    Quote from firstyearstudent
    Less boring lecture? It's a tightrope. You want to provide opportunities for group work ("Let's get in groups and do case studies, then present them") and for student comments ("I had an aunt with lupis and she ...."), on the hand there is a lot of material to be covered and not much time. In one of our classes the instructor had the class break into groups and each group research, prepare and present the lecture on a chapter from the textbook. This was interesting and good experience. We also do "Jeopardy" to review for tests and exams. It can be a lot of fun.
    I meant to mention this in my reply -- not TOO much group classwork...sometimes it's just an exercise in futility when you end up working with someone who KNOWS they're right and everyone else is wrong...they don't listen, head off doing what they want, then the rest of us get to either fight with them for control or sit back and act like we're uninterested in participation....the Jeopardy sounds like fun, too!!

    Also, sometimes I wish our instructors would reign in the "my aunt with lupus..." commentary....I really don't care what afflictions each of my fellow students' friends/family/long-last cat has/had....not being insensitive, but we ALL have stories....I want the instruction while I'm sitting in class during my very valuable time....

    Lastly, please, PLEASE, have your students turn off their cell phones!! This was a topic quite some time ago, but as strict as our instructors are, it's inevitable that at least once a week someone's phone goes off during lecture. Please tell your students that that is NOT acceptable...use vibrate, sound off, or something....it can really be so annoying....
  3. by   moongirl
    Quote from scribblerrn
    This was one of the hardest things for me to do when I first started. I would literally sit on my hands or hold them behind my back to keep them out of the students way! Part of this comes from not liking to stand there and be still. Often I'll tear of pieces of tape, fold a blanket, click a pen, anything to keep my hands busy and out of the way. But I DO stay out of the way, and that's the important thing.

    good for you!
    this instructor I had would cross her arms in front of her chest.. whatever works!
  4. by   CityKat
    Quote from scribblerrn
    I would like your opinion on some questions, so I can get a nursing student point of view! I am new to teaching nursing students, and desperately want to do a good job. I've received good reviews from students so far, but fresh ideas would be great.

    Please provide me with constructive criticism. I'm sure all of you have dealt with crummy nursing instructors (so have I), but don't think of them, when you answer the questions. Think about the ones that really helped you and made a difference.

    1. What have your clinical instructors done to enhance your learning during clinicals? Especially clinicals that didn't offer much in the way of practicing skills ( such as low chance for IV's, dressings, etc).

    2. What techniques have your teachers used to help lecture be less boring, but still provide you with the needed information?

    3. What would you like us (meaning nursing instructors) to know that would help you excel in your learning?

    4. This is just something I have wondered, but never asked any of my students... As you can see from my info, I'm pretty young compared to most nursing instructors and I look younger than what I really am. Someimes I see it as a positive, other times as a hindrance. What would be some of your FIRST impressions of a nursing instructor who was young? Meaning, what things roll across your mind when you walk into that first class or your first clinical and the person who says she is your instructor looks like she barely graduated high school, much less college? I feel very confident in my knowledge level and ability, but I do get some odd looks in the beginning and have always wondered, "What they are thinking?"
    1. My clinical instructor would do this: She would get each of us a patients nursing worksheet. It had the meds, the departmental orders, labs, expired orders, etc. She would ask each of us to go through the medications and find out what it is for and what the mechanism of action for that drug is. We would have to know the diagnosis for our patient and then utilize our critical thinking skills to figure out why our patient is on the drugs she is on. She also went through critical thinking skills with us. She would ask us scenarios and constant why does this.....ok, if this does this, then why does this....

    2. As far as making it more interesting in class, I think my bext professors would have interesting stories to share with the class. Humorous stories and not so humorous. They would get the students involved by asking questions or asking what their (students) take on this is, or how do they understand it.

    3. Everyone learns at different pace and students who talk during class are very disruptive. It's very difficult to understand the professor when people talk. I've had classes where students would just carry on conversations without any conscious that they were in a class with students etc. The teacher never said anything and quite honestly, I didn't learn much in that class and was sooo irritated that the professor never said a word to the students. It was mostly the students asking them to be quiet and that never worked. Also, reading every single word in the chapters and also reading everything in the notes is near impossible, so maybe when you test, try to be as fair as you can with the readings

    4. I wouldn't think much. I would maybe think there would be some students who wouldn't take you seriously in the beginning until you proves yourself. Me personally, that wouldn't happen. But, knowing some of the students in my school, they would certainty do that. Hope that helps.
  5. by   ibmaryann
    Short and sweet!!!!! If it is important enough to test on at least mention it in class!!!!! I have one teacher who lectures and gives notes and then tests on one line sentences from the text that she never mentioned in class.
    God Bless,
    Mary Ann
  6. by   shoegirl28
    1. What have your clinical instructors done to enhance your learning during clinicals? Especially clinicals that didn't offer much in the way of practicing skills ( such as low chance for IV's, dressings, etc).
    The best instructors jump at any chance to get students involved with skills. The also offer guidance when we do skills (even though we have the theory and may have practiced in lab etc when it comes down to doing it for real, between nerves, and things often being slightly different then the way they are in lab, a student can freeze). They might be the smartest student nurse in the group, but know nothing in the moment they are doing a skill for the first or second time. Asking questions of the student at the right time is key.

    2. What techniques have your teachers used to help lecture be less boring, but still provide you with the needed information?
    Everything. Guest speakers are my favourite part of any class. It often makes the information seem more real. Power points are also good. Large group discussions work well too. Group projects in teaching and learning are fun too.

    3. What would you like us (meaning nursing instructors) to know that would help you excel in your learning?
    In clinical we need an instructor to be very patient with us. The instructor should be approachable, and very nice in general. They should try to spend an equal amount of time with each student (all but one of my instructors did this, but the one who did not I certianly question her abalities as an instructor)...

    4. This is just something I have wondered, but never asked any of my students... As you can see from my info, I'm pretty young compared to most nursing instructors and I look younger than what I really am. Someimes I see it as a positive, other times as a hindrance. What would be some of your FIRST impressions of a nursing instructor who was young? Meaning, what things roll across your mind when you walk into that first class or your first clinical and the person who says she is your instructor looks like she barely graduated high school, much less college? I feel very confident in my knowledge level and ability, but I do get some odd looks in the beginning and have always wondered, "What they are thinking?"

    To me, I would probably think, wow this instructor is so young (or just a bit older then me I am 22). However I have good faith that a young teacher give students just as good if not better an education then older professors.
    I had a few young instructors and I must say they were all much more competent in teaching, then a couple of the older more experinced ones I had.
  7. by   tutored
    I am an "adult" (ahem) learner in the middle of nursing school, going back to college after many years out. I have more in common with my instructors than my fellow students! This means I have more rapport with them (the plus), but unfortunately it means that I have very, very little tolerance for what I've seen alot of from my teachers, particularly the older ones: intimidation, obvious correcting right in front of the patients, and generally treating me like I"m in high school. I really don't need that, and it doesn't help me learn. In fact, when I'm embarassed in front of a patient, my learning stops for the whole day because I just see red. There's just no need for the more-juvenille teaching methods in nursing school, at least with adult learners. So, to answer your question, what would I think if I went into class the first day with an apparently-younger teacher? I would hope, first, that this person was young enough to NOT employ such outdated "teaching" techniques. I would also hope that this younger teacher would be more open minded, and perhaps not on his or her own little power trip in the fiefdom of nursing school. The teachers I've had so far that I loved the most did not embarass me or correct me in front of the patients, and most importantly, they had a sense of humor and used it to defray tension. DO use humor, it's so important! Let me know how you do...I've had some teaching experience in my life, not much but enough to know how hard it is to connect with a class. Good luck!
  8. by   scholar
    The teachers I find to be superior to other professors are the ones that..

    #2. Relate what they're teaching in the classroom to real life scenarios. The best real life scenarios would be things that you've experienced. Allow the students to see your point of view when you were a student and tell them how you've changed b/c of this or that. For the student who knows a family member that has this condition or went through that Don't allow him/her to ellaborate more than 8 min.s on a subject. It doesnt bother me but I find that its highly irratating to others. I find group discussions to be enlightening b/c it allows you to see how others perceive things. No matter what never let one person hog the spotlight. Pay attention to the back of the classroom as well. Guests or inspiration speakers.
  9. by   trjohnson0213
    those r very good questions
    i want a nurse that is on time because if i have to be on time so do u because i have an instructor that is consistantly late & also she is very unorganized she comes to class with her notes all over the place and sometimes she is asking us where we stopped from the last class
    i attend a local community college so i get alot of hands on experience so i really don't have alot of problems with clinical or lab experience i do wish that we could have had more days in lab to get to do more procedures (wet to dry caths bandages etc)
    this is not relating to the instructors but i would like to trade some of the students
    my programs director & one of the other instructors r very incouraging giving advice when needed and i appreciate that
  10. by   OnTheRoad
    1. what have your clinical instructors done to enhance your learning during clinicals? especially clinicals that didn't offer much in the way of practicing skills ( such as low chance for iv's, dressings, etc). in my first clinical we were at a nursing home with chances for dressing changes and position changes, and gtube flush and that is it. i had not had any personal experience in a healthcare setting and i have to say that the most important thing my instructor did for me was this. the first day she saw how scared i was and placed me with a partner who was experienced as a cna. the second clinical... she saw that i needed to be pushed out of the nest and put me with someone so inexperienced and scared i took over and flew. she rotated our pairings the whole time so we all got to a point where we all felt competent and secure in our abilities.

    2. what techniques have your teachers used to help lecture be less boring, but still provide you with the needed information? one of my instructors used games made for nursing instruction set up like jeopordy or whatever and threw candy at us for correct answers (that kept us awake and competitive). giving real life examples also helped things stick in my mind.

    3. what would you like us (meaning nursing instructors) to know that would help you excel in your learning? real life examples, and although i am sure every tidbit of info is important... it would be nice to hear every once in awhile " this is something you will actually use daily"

    4. this is just something i have wondered, but never asked any of my students... as you can see from my info, i'm pretty young compared to most nursing instructors and i look younger than what i really am. someimes i see it as a positive, other times as a hindrance. what would be some of your first impressions of a nursing instructor who was young? meaning, what things roll across your mind when you walk into that first class or your first clinical and the person who says she is your instructor looks like she barely graduated high school, much less college? i feel very confident in my knowledge level and ability, but i do get some odd looks in the beginning and have always wondered, "what they are thinking?" i have had a couple young and incredible instructors, and a couple older and incredible instructors. younger age in my eyes doesn't equate less knowledge, but i will say that i see that when an older instructor is off the students tend to equate that to her just being out of the trenches too long, vs a younger instructor is judged harsher in that regard. just my two pennies.
  11. by   WDWpixieRN
    Quote from scholar
    For the student who knows a family member that has this condition or went through that Don't allow him/her to ellaborate more than 8 min.s on a subject. It doesnt bother me but I find that its highly irratating to others.
    When it's the same TWO students who do this repeatedly, either tell them to talk to you after class, or keep them to 30 seconds...most of us don't care or also have similar situations we don't feel that the other 35 students are probably interested in....especially when there's a ton of textbook info we need to learn....ugh!!
  12. by   jb2u
    1. what have your clinical instructors done to enhance your learning during clinicals? especially clinicals that didn't offer much in the way of practicing skills ( such as low chance for iv's, dressings, etc).
    do not have the students so immersed in care plans that they can not actually learn from them. i believe that they are good learning tools, but only if one has time to study them. i believe that in every clinical situation there is a learning experience waiting. even without iv's, dressings, etc. there are always those psychosocial issues and disease progression questions. i like it when professors seek out learning opportunities for us. maybe there is someone going to a procedure (picc placement, mri, etc.).

    2. what techniques have your teachers used to help lecture be less boring, but still provide you with the needed information?
    please pass out copies of the lecture or power point. i do not take notes, and i hate it when every two minutes someone says, "can you repeat that...can you spell that...hold on...etc" just because they are trying to write down every word that comes out of your mouth. i am in my final semester now and the one thing that i know is...telling students "do not write down every word that i say" does not help. so pass out copies of the power point or lecture guide so they will write less and interrupt less.


    3. what would you like us (meaning nursing instructors) to know that would help you excel in your learning?
    we only need professors to be fair, organized, and know their stuff.

    4. this is just something i have wondered, but never asked any of my students... as you can see from my info, i'm pretty young compared to most nursing instructors and i look younger than what i really am. someimes i see it as a positive, other times as a hindrance. what would be some of your first impressions of a nursing instructor who was young? meaning, what things roll across your mind when you walk into that first class or your first clinical and the person who says she is your instructor looks like she barely graduated high school, much less college? i feel very confident in my knowledge level and ability, but i do get some odd looks in the beginning and have always wondered, "what they are thinking?"
    when in the army, a former sergeant once told me that "when you carry yourself like a man...age is just a number." well, the same goes for you. when you carry yourself like a professor...age is just a number!
    i am impressed with your knowledge and experience not how long you have been on earth. age only tells us how long a person has been out of the womb. it does not tell us if the person is sick or well, good or bad, happy or sad, intelligent or not. it does not tell us where that person has been or where he or she is going. i can not tell you the age of the students that judge you based on your age, or the appearance of, but i can tell you that they have some things to learn about age.

    sincerely,
    jay (life's student)
  13. by   scribblerpnp
    I too love class discussions and interaction, but sometimes it is SO HARD. There is so much material and often the classes I teach have 100 students in there, also, the classrooms are so small, that the students are placed into three different rooms in the building and I am broadcasted via TV or some other kind of "magic" which I really don't understand. Makes it hard to connect and to get group discussion! SIGH. I wish our program had money for a new building with BIG classrooms.

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