Question regarding IV vs. IVP

  1. Hi everyone,

    OK, this is probably a very simple question that every student should probably know, but I guess I just want to be sure that I am understanding everything correctly.

    When you see on a test, book or perhaps even in a chart IV you would assume that something was given to a patient via IV with the tubing, hanging bag, maybe the use of a pump, etc. correct?

    When you see on a test, book or perhaps even in a chart IVP you would assume that means IV Push, so that would entail pushing a medication over a few seconds to even minutes rather than just hanging a bag up on the IV poll and letting it run on it's own, correct?

    If I am misunderstanding something about these two abbreviations and their meanings please let me know. I never really thought about this until I had an exam last night with a question regarding this.
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  2. 10 Comments

  3. by   Achoo!
    I'm not in the program yet, but isn't IVP intravenous pyelogram??
  4. by   Ruylupez
    IV = intravenous which means the bag of fluid and the tube and all that...
    IVP = Intravenous Push which is an injection into a port in the IV tube
    IVPB = Intravenous piggy back
  5. by   Mom2kids
    Quote from Achoo!
    I'm not in the program yet, but isn't IVP intravenous pyelogram??

    I agree. I used to work in Radiology (12 years ago) as a unit secretary and if there were ever orders for an IVP, it meant an intravenous pyelogram...which is what we'd schedule the pt. for.

    You sure IV push isn't something different? I'm not an RN (yet), however, that was my experience when I dealt with nurses from the floors back then.....
  6. by   Stitchie
    If you're in Radiology and someone orders 'IVP' then you'd be correct; it's on your order sheet.

    If there is an order written '40 mg Lasix IVP now' for the patient, then the order is to give 40mg of Lasix intravenous push.

    There are many abbreviations/shortcuts/shorthand methods used when charting. At times each abbreviation does double-duty; you just have to know what the context is so that you get the order right.
  7. by   purplemania
    excellent example of how confusing abbreviations can be. I have even seen PIV for "peripheral intravenous". When in doubt ASK
  8. by   Mom2kids
    Stitchie -

    Thanks for the clarification.....my lesson for the day.



    Quote from Stitchie
    If you're in Radiology and someone orders 'IVP' then you'd be correct; it's on your order sheet.

    If there is an order written '40 mg Lasix IVP now' for the patient, then the order is to give 40mg of Lasix intravenous push.

    There are many abbreviations/shortcuts/shorthand methods used when charting. At times each abbreviation does double-duty; you just have to know what the context is so that you get the order right.
  9. by   colleen10
    Hi everyone,

    Thank you for back up support, glad to see I know what I am talking about.

    In this instance it was meant as IVP - IV Push, one of the answers was IVP 100U of Insulin. Just wanted to make sure that I correctly understood it to be an IV Push, not setting up an IV Bag of 100U insulin.
  10. by   zambezi
    I agree with what has been said re: your test, however, in the "real world", I almost never see IVP. It is 40 mg IV lasix...or 2 mg MS IV...at least in my workplace, you rarely see the "P" on the end...
  11. by   Carolanne
    Yes, we really have to double check the abbreviations and make sure the right one is being used. Last semester a student had an order for Tylenol p.r.n. and she read it as p.r. It was a hectic night and the instructor didn't catch it in time and subsequently the patient got the med in his rectum which was totally unnecessary.
  12. by   canoehead
    No matter what the doc writes I look up the correct way to give it, because sometimes they don't know. In my opinion whether you hang it or push it comes down to how long you are willing to stand there with a syringe in your hand vrs how much fluid the patient can handle. For example, in L&D they write IVP 2G magnesium and hang it at 2G an hour. Magnesium burns, and should go over 20 minutes, so I take a bag and program a pump to bolus over the 20 min and then reset itself to 2G an hour once the bolus is in. I am not going to stand at the bedside holding a syringe for 20 minutes when it can be safely done another way.

    And of course, you have to watch what your pump is doing, and pt reactions, but you can do other things in the room at the same time.

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