Only charting? - page 5

I'm a first year nursing student and to be honest, the majority of what I've seen nurses do is charting and give meds. Is this all I will do?... Read More

  1. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from brinkk
    Do you realize that you usually need two years or so of critical care nursing to be an NP? You seem very uneducated on this topic, which is probably because you are just a student and have no idea what real nursing is like.
    I don't think that is correct. I think you may be confusing that with the requirements for CRNA school.
  2. by   SopranoKris
    Some ACNP programs require critical care experience. But I do agree, most FNP programs do not.
  3. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from SopranoKris
    Some ACNP programs require critical care experience. But I do agree, most FNP programs do not.
    Thanks! What I love about AN is that I usually learn at least ONE new thing every time I visit.
  4. by   crazydoglady89
    WOW.

    I feel bad for Lightning. While there is nothing wrong with not wanting to be a bedside nurse, it is absolutely disgusting to look down upon nurses/any member of your healthcare TEAM. This goes for all professions/work settings. Everyone has different backgrounds, and that is why people come together to make it happen. NP's do not run the entire show. Not even CLOSE. You will be quickly humbled by how many people are 100x smarter than you.

    My husband is a PA with 5 years experience and top notch grades, still pretty young. He often speaks highly of the nurses he has worked with in his years who have "saved" him or greatly educated him at work. In his ICU rotation, he always said how thankful he was that he worked with such brilliant nurses who were there to help and educate.

    If Lightning even MAKES IT to NP school (much less through nursing school), I'm sure their colleagues will see right through their crappy attitude and not make their job any easier. When you need the help of a lowly nurse, I'm sure they will take extra care of you. Also, you would very possibly be working with some RN's who make more money than you as a new NP. Hope that doesn't upset you too much. Or when a patient says they don't want to see the nurse (you), they'd rather see the DOCTOR.
  5. by   brinkk
    Quote from Horseshoe
    I don't think that is correct. I think you may be confusing that with the requirements for CRNA school.
    Both of the FNP programs in my state list it as a preference on their website, but not a requirement. My mistake. Not a requirement, but it will obviously help you be more competitive experience wise.
  6. by   Horseshoe
    Quote from brinkk
    Both of the FNP programs in my state list it as a preference on their website, but not a requirement. My mistake. Not a requirement, but it will obviously help you be more competitive experience wise.
    I agree. I know there are some very good FNPs who went straight into practice without working as RNs, but I think overall that experience in the trenches FIRST would make them even better. JMO, and I'll admit that I've never worked as a FNP so there's a chance I'm wrong.
  7. by   elkpark
    Quote from brinkk
    Both of the FNP programs in my state list it as a preference on their website, but not a requirement. My mistake. Not a requirement, but it will obviously help you be more competitive experience wise.
    Are you talking about general nursing experience, or critical care, specifically, experience? Your previous statement was about critical care experience being required for FNP programs.
  8. by   brinkk
    Quote from elkpark
    Are you talking about general nursing experience, or critical care, specifically, experience? Your previous statement was about critical care experience being required for FNP programs.
    Experience. I didn't mean to put critical care.
  9. by   Extra Pickles
    Quote from Lightning90
    . Anyway, i stand by the comments I have made. NURSES think they use their brain alot? Than what do doctors do? LOL. Doctors are the ones truly saving peoples lives..
    Then (notice the correct spelling?) why are you not in medical school? It's nice that you hold such a high esteem for physicians, but as you are in school to become a nurse, it looks like you don't expect to be able to do much as a nurse practitioner, as you say doctors are the ones truly saving people's lives.

    Nurses are just babysitting. Stop acting like nurses analyze every single little thing over every single second of work. Most of the time youre being a waiter, cna or housekeeper
    I dearly hope that when loved ones of yours are in a hospital they are not assigned a waiter or housekeeper to provide nursing care. It won't go well for them I assure you. The fact that you can't see the difference saddens me, and it's also unfortunate for your loved ones. You won't know who is providing good, competent care and who isn't, as you think everyone who is not a physician is all the same to you.

    I wonder what you'd do to know that sometimes, to a physician, you as a nurse practitioner might just as well be a housekeeper? Something tells me you'd be all turned inside out over that, insisting you are better than what they think you are. Doesn't matter really as it's unlikely you'd get to that point anyway, just food for thought.
  10. by   AliNajaCat
    Thanks to Esme for editing this troll-y thread. I think you might have missed a few teeeeeny bits, LOL.

    {::hugs and smudge::}

    As for Lightning, I just can't wait to see how he or she cuts the first semester of nursing clinicals. Oh my stars and garters, I'd pay good money (of which I earn quite a bit in my specialty, thanks) to see me some of that.
  11. by   Tpa.travlr946531
    No way! While there are nurses who perform minimum standards of passing meds and documentation, many of us are intervening every day to make a positive impact. One of the things I find most rewarding is finding what care has been missed (it's a lot everywhere) and addressing those things for the patient. Often times, they have been life saving interventions. For example, You prevent a code by telling a doctor you think the patient is septic. The proper workup is done, and it wouldn't have been done had you not assessed and advocated. Practitioners aren't perfect. They miss a lot of stuff! You will be surprised how much. Realistically the patient avoids a code and an icu trip and extended hospitalization. I'm
  12. by   Niquolea26
    Thank you, I think I just had a lousy first clinical experience. There were two nurses that were phenomenal but the others....I had no clue what a fire this would light or else I probably would have kept my mouth shut...
  13. by   Tpa.travlr946531
    I'm glad you did say something. This is the time to ask your questions to more experienced nurses. It's a good question! Don't let anyone make you feel bad for asking it. You got a lot of different perspectives on your post. You have a lot of nurses that are great and support each other. Obviously from this post we still have a few out there who have bad attitudes and eat their young. Don't let these people get you down. You get to decide what you do as a nurse, no one else! You get to decide what type of nurse you will be. No matter what the staffing is and who you are working with, you still get that chance to make a difference. I'm in my 9th year, and I'm so glad I became a nurse. I'm lucky that I have a job that is challenging but one that I love. Stay with it....we all have a bad day once in a while. I'll bet you're going to do great.

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