Non-CNA Jobs You Can Work While You're a Student - page 5

by TheCommuter 42,563 Views | 58 Comments Senior Moderator

You are studying to become a nurse and would like to be working for a variety of reasons. Perhaps you would prefer to graduate from nursing school completely free of debt, or at the very least, you wish to minimize any student... Read More


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    Quote from jonesel9
    @edimo or @ original poster how do you go about finding these positions in your state?I am interested in the transporter and unit secretary while I am in school. Do I need to call you the original poster to get started with either one of these position?
    I landed my job by searching various hospital websites and checking out their employment postings under the general/admin area...that's usually where they would come up
  2. 0
    Quote from jonesel9
    @edimo or @ original poster how do you go about finding these positions in your state?I am interested in the transporter and unit secretary while I am in school. Do I need to call you the original poster to get started with either one of these position?
    Check out the jobs/careers section of hospital websites to see if any job openings are posted. Also walk into nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and group homes during business hours (Monday through Friday from 9am to 5pm) and see if they're accepting applications for any of these jobs.

    Check out websites such as CraigsList and Indeed to search for job openings.
  3. 0
    Thank you, Miiki, for sharing.

    If you are in a two year, associate degree, nursing program that leads to an R.N. if NCLEX passed, how do you determine if and when you can become a CNA?

    Thank you.
  4. 1
    Quote from pmabraham
    Thank you, Miiki, for sharing.

    If you are in a two year, associate degree, nursing program that leads to an R.N. if NCLEX passed, how do you determine if and when you can become a CNA?

    Thank you.
    CNA indicates "certified". As a nursing student you have gained the skills and can (in most places) get hired, but you are not a CNA. I am certified in my state as a CNA through my nursing program. I have a certification number on the state registry. If you don't have this, I would state that you have completed nursing fundementals or your junior year clinicals or something.
    Last edit by Miiki SN on Feb 7, '13
    anie10 likes this.
  5. 1
    This is a great article. Several nurses I know started off as dietary aides in the hospital then "moved up the ranks" to become CNAs and eventually RNs. It's nice to know that there are multiple ways to get a foot in the door!
    ICUman likes this.
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    Oh and I forgot to mention another non-CNA hospital job would be to work as a CPD tech (Central Processing and Distribution). I think most other places call them Central Distribution but that's just what they call them at our hospital. We've had a couple of them become RTs.
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    very helpful, thanks!
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    I wouldn't recommend working as a CMA while you're in school. There is very little flexibility in scheduling- it is usually a 9-5, 40 hr job. I worked as a evening/night unit secretary in the NICU- tons of study time as it's usually pretty quiet there- and now as unlicensed support assistant in a surg unit. Once you finish fundamentals (in my state, at least) you can apply for a CNA license through the board. Once you have that, you have a lot of options- student nurse, PCT, sitter, nursing support, etc.
    ICUman and kywoodrd like this.
  9. 0
    over a year as a pharmacy tech here, starting ADN in august... hope already knowing all the meds and drug classes will help somewhere along the line!
  10. 0
    Hi I know this is super late, but how do you get certified to be a phlebotomist while in nursing school? I have all day classes and I don't think I can adjust my schedule much? Thanks in advance!


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