I AM TERRIFIED - page 3

by Kdrenee

2,548 Views | 39 Comments

I am so excited to start nursing school in may, but I just found out I do not get any government aid due to my father making too much money, and due to the fact that I am not yet 23. Hello, my father doesn't help me pay for... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from russodem
    I believe your actually considered a dependent until 24. Talk to your aid office, you can't do this through the FAFSA website. I talked to my school since I had a similar situation (under 24, not living at home, non contributory parents) and I was able to get an independet status. I had to fill out paper work and prove they didn't support my income. Basically all this does however is give you slightly more federal loans. In the end you will most likely need some private or Parent Plus loans to cover the difference.
    Awesome ugggg
  2. 0
    @cjr2619: private student loans are usually easier to get, but the terms of the loan are not as good as government loans. It is easy to get caught up in the borrowing cycle to put yourself through school, but jobs are not as readily available to new grads in this economy. I've spoken to many of my newer co-workers and they tell me horror stories about loan terms, higher interest rates, monthly payments that nearly total a paycheck! Many of the nurses have put off starting families and buying homes due to the enormous amount of student loan debt they have. I am not saying not to take a private student loan if that is your only option, just to look at other options first to pay for school and living expenses.
  3. 0
    Wow...only $20-30K for BSN? My loans are 30% federal loan programs and 60% private loans. My monthly payments (paying more than the amount due each month) are about $700 - which is about the same as my rent is. My interest rates are all under 3% even the private loans... My biweekly pay post taxes and benefits is almost enough to cover rent and loans in one check... So I don't feel like I'm too pressured.

    I could have paid off a federal loan this past year, but I'm SO glad I didn't - I was off work for 4 weeks for emergency surgery and didn't have nearly enough PTO to cover it...I had saved money and had enough saved to pay my bills while off work. The way it hit with pay periods it affected two months I had to cover month one's rent utilities/groceries and loans, and then month two's rent utilities/groceries and loans plus gas money to cover two weeks worth of work (ugh...I had a 150 mile round trip commute for work at the time and gas was almost $4/gallon in my area at the time) before getting paid again. That's the only time I sweated my bills...

    I worked three jobs in nursing school plus full time school, and was the primary caregiver for my terminally ill grandmother. Yeah. At one point I thought I may pull all my hair out during nursing school. As if that wasn't enough, I got a puppy during that time too...(my dog is awesome, it was just VERY difficult for a while). My junior and senior years I paid my summer tuition and interterm (6 week term between fall and winter quarters) tuition, year round housing, plus senior year study abroad out of pocket. That really helped me.

    I would recommend buying books online where possible (used where possible)... I used half.com most terms, but Barnes and Noble can save you some serious money as a member (did that some terms too)... Our bookstore had a HUGE upcharge on books. But they did have exactly what the professors were using...

    Also - to some of the posters who comment that new grads are struggling with loans? Most lenders will either "pro-rate" loan payments based on income and/or continue to defer payments if you cannot secure employment. There is paperwork to go along with this, but it can be done. I know for sure for federal loans, and some private loans will too.
  4. 0
    Quote from dah doh
    @cjr2619: private student loans are usually easier to get, but the terms of the loan are not as good as government loans. It is easy to get caught up in the borrowing cycle to put yourself through school, but jobs are not as readily available to new grads in this economy. I've spoken to many of my newer co-workers and they tell me horror stories about loan terms, higher interest rates, monthly payments that nearly total a paycheck! Many of the nurses have put off starting families and buying homes due to the enormous amount of student loan debt they have. I am not saying not to take a private student loan if that is your only option, just to look at other options first to pay for school and living expenses.
    Yes if my payment is terribly high I will not get a loan. Idk what I will do, but I'm not going to let my financial situation get out of control.

    Hopefully I will get as many grants as possible, and only have to get a small loan. I will just have to live very frugally while going you school and keep my job. My car will be paid off by the time I start my nursing program so that's a plus!!!
  5. 0
    Quote from DesireeRN2011
    Wow...only $20-30K for BSN? My loans are 30% federal loan programs and 60% private loans. My monthly payments (paying more than the amount due each month) are about $700 - which is about the same as my rent is. My interest rates are all under 3% even the private loans... My biweekly pay post taxes and benefits is almost enough to cover rent and loans in one check... So I don't feel like I'm too pressured.

    I could have paid off a federal loan this past year, but I'm SO glad I didn't - I was off work for 4 weeks for emergency surgery and didn't have nearly enough PTO to cover it...I had saved money and had enough saved to pay my bills while off work. The way it hit with pay periods it affected two months I had to cover month one's rent utilities/groceries and loans, and then month two's rent utilities/groceries and loans plus gas money to cover two weeks worth of work (ugh...I had a 150 mile round trip commute for work at the time and gas was almost $4/gallon in my area at the time) before getting paid again. That's the only time I sweated my bills...

    I worked three jobs in nursing school plus full time school, and was the primary caregiver for my terminally ill grandmother. Yeah. At one point I thought I may pull all my hair out during nursing school. As if that wasn't enough, I got a puppy during that time too...(my dog is awesome, it was just VERY difficult for a while). My junior and senior years I paid my summer tuition and interterm (6 week term between fall and winter quarters) tuition, year round housing, plus senior year study abroad out of pocket. That really helped me.

    I would recommend buying books online where possible (used where possible)... I used half.com most terms, but Barnes and Noble can save you some serious money as a member (did that some terms too)... Our bookstore had a HUGE upcharge on books. But they did have exactly what the professors were using...

    Also - to some of the posters who comment that new grads are struggling with loans? Most lenders will either "pro-rate" loan payments based on income and/or continue to defer payments if you cannot secure employment. There is paperwork to go along with this, but it can be done. I know for sure for federal loans, and some private loans will too.
    Thank you for the tips, and I commend you on living through what you did in nursing school lol.

    I know people get student loans everyday, I just never had to, and didn't really think about it. You can say I'm a but of a tight wad so getting a loan is terrifying to me. I'm definitely going to check out that book website you gave me!
  6. 0
    are you covered by your parents' health insurance? I think that's a key factor they use in determining dependency status. If you are truly independent from your folks (no ins, no rent/food/living expenses help) they you can go to your school's financial aid office and file for them to rule you an independent student. I had to do this when I was in college previously, and it was a lot of paperwork I had to fill out, and get forms verified by landlord/employers, etc to prove that I really was supporting myself without any parental assistance.
  7. 0
    yes I am still on my dads insurance That is the ONLY thing he helps me with, only bc it is the same price with or without me on it bc of my sister.
  8. 2
    Good day:

    I'm trying to get over the sense of entitlement that moms and dads are such terrible people if they don't pay for their adult children's education vs. hoping that those fellow (though younger adults) will learn how to make it on their own.

    7 Easy Steps to the FAFSA: Student's Guide to the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and Lancaster General College - Student Financial Services Presentation - Website are good tutorial presentations about FAFSA.

    While the recent open house tour I was on didn't concentrate on FAFSA, they did have a segment that went over if you are living away from your parents that you can be declared independent without regard to your age.

    When you apply for FAFSA, I'm told that you will automatically be enrolled for any grants your state may offer.

    You may also want to check out Fastweb : Scholarships, Financial Aid, Student Loans and Colleges for any scholarships or grants you maybe able to receive.

    I'm sure homework is being done in the financial aid area, but also look at what part time jobs you may be able to take while in school without compromising the grades you want to attain.

    Thank you.
    GrnTea and kogafietsen like this.
  9. 2
    Quote from pmabraham
    Good day:

    I'm trying to get over the sense of entitlement that moms and dads are such terrible people if they don't pay for their adult children's education vs. hoping that those fellow (though younger adults) will learn how to make it on their own.
    .
    I don't think parents are horrible people for not paying for their children's education.

    What I do think is terrible is the "go get a free ride" mentality. Getting grants is not learning to make it on your own. It's taking tax payers money to pay your way. Why should I send your kid to college if you aren't even willing to do so, taking away funds from families who really and truly cannot afford to education their children?

    Gone are the days that people can work their way through school. Tuition is way too high. We're now DEBTING our way through school, and that's not the start in life I choose to give my children. Different strokes for different folks.
    zoe92 and Jill2Shay like this.
  10. 1
    I'm not saying my dad is a terrible person for not helping me, but it would definitely be nice if he did. I work, I pay all of my bills, and I put myself through my pre-reqs without his help or financial aid. It's not about learning to take care of myself. I can already do that and have been since 18.

    It's about the fact that I'm going to have a large terrifying debt to pay as soon as a get my first job in my new career. Like someone else said, people are debting their way through because tuition is too high.

    Believe me if I could pay for it I would, but if I could pay for it I probably wouldn't be going to school to be a nurse because I would already have money!!

    It's just surprising to me that you have to be 23, or have a child, or be married to be considered "independent." I am still looking into ways around, but we will see. I will live if I do end up being in debt forever!

    As for the comment about other people paying people's tuition through grants because their parents just won't, I agree. It's not fair, my dad has plenty of money to help, he just chooses not to.
    pmabraham likes this.


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