How do you learn to give injections? - page 4

Hi all i'm not in nursing schol yet but i was wandering for those of you who are how are you thought to give injections.Do you pratice on dolls or what?Sorry if this question seems dumb but i was... Read More

  1. by   ohmeowzer RN
    ooh back in the old days in LPN school .. we used a orange.. i named it mrs johnson.. in RN school i didn't need to worry because i have been giving injections for 21 years..
  2. by   4doghome
    We used injection pads, oranges, and each other. We were able to practice drawing up the medicine. For me that was the hardest part. I have a real hard time getting rid of all the air bubbles. Then we would inject it into the pad or the oranges. When it was time to give each other our subq, it was very scary. But since then I have given 2 or 3 in clinicals and its a peice of cake now. I still have yet to give an IM. Injecting is the easiest part of nursing school.
  3. by   angle85
    In regard my school we learn the method in lab then try it on dolls under teacher supervision in ideal steps, after that in other courses we practice injection in hospital with our teacher, and by time take expert.
  4. by   TRINI_RN
    We practiced on oranges first, then on the manequins, then on eachother with sterile water. We give ALOT in clinical though, mostly SC. I've only given a handful of IM, but lots of SC.
  5. by   struggling nsg s2dnt
    aw in our school, we literally practice giving the meds on our selves first! it's really painful!... I think we're the only med school who practice that stuff's..:smiley_ab
  6. by   struggling nsg s2dnt
    http://photos-647.friendster.com/e1/...7/1_423139078m
    sample how painful our return demonstration was!grrr
    Last edit by struggling nsg s2dnt on Nov 10, '07
  7. by   lin263
    with sweat pouring down, hands shaking while i drew it up and injected it. i was handed a hand full of syringes and a btl of flu vaccine in a nursing home. some how i got it all done.
    hint: dont forget to check where the tip of the needle is in the vial before you draw it up. have all the stuff you need. embarassing not to have the alcohol prep pads. dont forget to put the air in the vial.

    what other hints are there?
    Last edit by lin263 on Nov 10, '07 : Reason: more hints
  8. by   nicolej1024
    In my school we had learned the skills in lab and then poked eachother that same day.It was the absolute worst day ever. Anyways we had an awesome instructor in concepts 2 that knew of our experience and arranged for us to do a flu clinic as one of our clinical days.After that I feel so comfortable doing injections before, I was terrified. You really just need practice and thats how you feel comfortable.


    Nicole:spin:
  9. by   caliotter3
    I do not remember injections being covered in skills lab at my school. In one of my clinical rotations, I was told by my clinical instructor to steal needles and syringes from the hospital and to practice at home. (This was one of the instructors who had obvious "problems"). Needless to say, I did not follow this unstable woman's advice. I had awake nightmares about being stopped by the police for a traffic stop, them searching the car, and me getting charged for being in possession of "paraphernalia". This was the defining moment for me concerning my nursing instructor and my nursing program. I never did get any practice with injections while I was in school. I learned on the job.
  10. by   CT Pixie
    We were given lecture in lab and shown how to draw meds first. We were all given a vial and a syringe to handle and practice with. Then we were lectured and shown giving the injection on rubber dummies (thigh, butt, deltoid, and a forearm for the ID injections). We then did a repeat dem for the instuctor and checked off.

    we were then allowed to do injections in the clinicals. I got checked off a few weeks ago on a Tuesday and the next day we were in clinicals giving insulin. Not too long after, we were given the greatest opportunity that thappened to fall at the right time..flu vaccine season!! Me and my fellow clinical classmates gave the ENTIRE LTC facility their flu shots... Talk about being nerve wracking! But I can tell you with that many IM injections to do in a course of a couple of days, I felt like an expert on the last day. It was the best educational opportunity!
  11. by   beth66335
    We practice on dummy "parts" too. We learn injections with reg. syringes and TB and Insulin syringes. The forearm we practiced IDs on had so many pokes we couldn't get a bleb!LOL!We had a lab checkoff giving a IM into the Vastus Lateralis muscle on a dummy it was great! We also had to practice drawing up a mixed syringe of regular and cloudy insulin.
  12. by   MrsHarrison0526
    we practiced on the injection pads also.. which to me do little justice... i was dx'ed with type 1 diabetes when i was 15.. and they made me stick an orange... i stuck it so much it got bloated and seeped fluid.. that didn't help much but i sure know how to do my finger sticks and sub q... i offered anyone that was unsure about subq to do an insulin one on me... no takers... hmmm... i think that we should get to stick each other.. they used to do it at our school but stopped... some people get out of school without giving an IM shot.. not many... but i know for a fact most get out with givin a TB shot... but as they say... nursing school only gets u the basics... u learn the most once u get out...
  13. by   APBT mom
    We had dummy parts and gave two injections in them in front of the instructor to make sure that we had the concept right and then we went to town on each other. We were allowed to give as many as we wanted but we were only allowed to have 5 injections a day done to us (2 deltoids, 2 intradermals, 1 sug q). I think giving someone the injection is better than using a dummy so you actually stick someone and know what it feels. Dummy parts do no justice. I can remember three girls went to stick another student and as soon as they did the let go of the syringe. One girl even bent the needle after hitting someones bone.

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