Gifts for staff

  1. Just curious..
    At the end of each clinical rotation, we are encouraged to buy a gift and cards for the staff, and our clinical instructor. :hatparty: Does anyone else practice this? Its getting kind of expensive. My last rotation, we got gifts for the nurses, donuts for the staff in the Cath lab, and gifts for another department we observed.At the conclusion of the rotation we all go out to eat. We presented the instructor with a gift, card, and paid for her lunch. I'm going broke.
    I do appreciate the help and encouragement I have received from the staff on the floor I am working with, but this is getting a little much.
    Berta
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  2. 14 Comments

  3. by   llg
    I have been a nurse for many, many years and have seen that some schools do this type of thing and others don't.

    Personally, I have never approved of it for several reasons.

    1. It gets terribly expensive for the students and those of us who get a paycheck should not expect the students to buy us stuff.

    2. It gets terribly inconvenient for the students to have to shop for all the stuff, choose gifts that people will like, make sure nobody gets left out, etc.

    3. It sets up an unhealthy expectation that we should buy people presents just for doing their job. We shouldn't all need to receive a "tip" for giving good service -- we should give the good service as part of our routine. Where does it end?

    I believe that a smile and a "thank you" are all that should be given in most instances. For something really special (such as an extended preceptorship), then a card and/or perhaps a very small inexpensive gift is a nice -- but not required gesture.

    Others may disagree, but I am totally on your side on this one.

    llg -- who has been both a giver and receiver of such gifts
  4. by   Berta
    I have given a gift and a card for extra special instructor or nurse. I just prefer to do it in private. I have gotten some wonder help and suggestions along the way.

    One site we were at in particular told us (students), that they didn't want us there. :angryfire Our instructor even ended up speaking with the director of nursing over several conflicts between them and us. It was a pretty sad scene. However, we did end up giving a gift and card to the staff.



    Thanks for your feedback, Berta
  5. by   fergus51
    I think a food day is a nice gesture. It hardly costs any money to bake some cupcakes or cookies and buy a card. It certainly isn't necessary, but it is a really nice thing to do for the nurses who have helped you on your road to becoming a nurse.

    Most nurses don't get thanked very often in their job.
  6. by   Ruylupez
    My first semester the instructor asked us to bring a small snack for the nurses (Donuts, cookies, brownies or something along that line). The instructor stressed that this was voluntary. It cost me about $3 and I was happy to do it since the nurses were so nice to us while we were there. One small gift and card to the staff as a whole would also be acceptable, but anything more would be excessive.

    The instructors having you buy them lunch and give them a gift and card seems unprofessional. These people are giving you a grade and there should be nothing in place that makes a student feel they must give a good gift out of fear for that grade.
  7. by   TweetiePieRN
    Every semester at the end, we would give the facility a thank you card with all our names signed on it. Then all of us students would all go out to lunch. Everyone paid for themselves and the instructor was invited to come along (and would pay for their own meal too)...but this was not a gift to our instructor. It was a celebration of the getting thru another semester. This is my last semester and it will probably end the same as all the others. Except this time...a bunch of us are going to go to a day spa and get all spoiled~!!
  8. by   Noney
    Berta

    When I was in school it discouraged by the instructors to buy them a gift. However, clinical groups had been buying gifts for so many years that we always ended up going it anyway. Everyone threw in $1 to $3. We never bought anything for the nurses at the clinical sites. I understand how you feel, Even a few extra bucks is rough when you are in school.


    Noney
  9. by   Berta
    I do agree to pooling funds and with each student contributing $2-3 for a for the floor. However, we are now starting to include some of the other floors and dept. we may visit while on that floor. That gets expensive!!!

    As for giving to our instructors, the gift is actually presented after we are told if we pass or fail. To be completely honest, even if I failed, I would contribute to their gift simply because they had to put up with me for the term. They deserve it.

    Bert
  10. by   suzanne4
    The things that I have always appreciated the most were the hand-written notes from the students, where they actually took the time to say what they enjoyed about their rotation, etc. Time is the most valuable commodity for all of us, and that someone took the time to sit down and write was just perfect....................and will always remain the best thing in my book.....it means so much more than a gift that you go to purchase, for it is truly a gift from the heart.
  11. by   Gompers
    I agree that the home-made goodies would be a great treat - you can bake a whole bunch of sweets for dirt cheap, and you know they always taste better than the expensive store-bought stuff. It's a nice little token of thanks without going overboard.

    Though I have to say, of all gifts that we get from students and patients' families, the one that always goes over the best...is Krispy Kremes. Just buy a few dozen and drop a box off at each of the sites you did clinicals. Something about those donuts just makes everyone's day.

  12. by   MandyInMS
    Geez..when I was in school I was doing good to cover the basics much less anything extra..gifts are nice if you can afford it..but should be given in private,so the others who can'ts afford it don't feel bad. I've found just telling people thank you and how much you appreciate their help is just as good..I know it makes me feel good to feel appreciated every now and then..something so simple as a thank you makes my day
  13. by   jenrninmi
    Quote from Berta
    Just curious..
    At the end of each clinical rotation, we are encouraged to buy a gift and cards for the staff, and our clinical instructor. :hatparty: Does anyone else practice this? Its getting kind of expensive. My last rotation, we got gifts for the nurses, donuts for the staff in the Cath lab, and gifts for another department we observed.At the conclusion of the rotation we all go out to eat. We presented the instructor with a gift, card, and paid for her lunch. I'm going broke.
    I do appreciate the help and encouragement I have received from the staff on the floor I am working with, but this is getting a little much.
    Berta
    We have done this. AND I understand your concerns. I've only been through Primary Care and Maternal child so far so, so far it hasn't gotten really expensive yet. We got together as a group to get the gift. Are EACH of you buying your own gifts? That definately could get expensive.
  14. by   kahumai
    This semester we're on two floors. We just left the medical floor 2 weeks ago and our instructor told us we had to bring food. I refused to bring anything because: (a) I have no job and no money to buy anything; (b) I'm loaded with end-of-semester papers, projects, etc. and have no time to bake cupcakes; and (c) the nurses on that floor did *nothing* for the students. We were never anything more to them but someone to do their jobs for a few hours, and they have never offered advice, suggestions, or help. They were rude and acted as if we were in the way. And we're expected to do this twice in a semester!

    I completely agree that if the instructor/floor has been helpful or encouraging, it's appropriate to give a token of gratificiation. I don't, however, feel that I shoud be obliged to spend my time or money on gifts for people who didn't even take the time to say hello in the morning. And in all honesty, we would go into patient's rooms and find out that when we weren't there, nobody would help them (i.e. a full week without a bath or oral care, etc.) I see no need to reward lazy behavior.

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