Experts in A&P I - page 2

Okay guys, I am here to test out your suggestions. I begin A&P I in Jan. I am looking to get a head start on the class. What should I start memeorizing first? Any helpful hints or tips to get... Read More

  1. by   erinslone
    Hey I took A&P I last semester and LOVED it. I found it truely interesting. The thing that a friend of mine and I found very helpful was to take in a digital camera and take pictures of the things that you are studying. We are in A&P II right now and it is really helping us more than ever. Since the actual things you will be using on the Lab Practicals and quizzes are what are in your class what better way to study than to use pictures of the "real" thing??

    I hope that this helps. If it means anything to you I got an A. I hope that you enjoy that class because it really is interesting. And BTW A&P II is TERRIBLE!!! So enjoy it while it easy.

    Erin
  2. by   2amigos
    I am in A&P1 now and yes we have to memorize all the bones, the condyles, fissures and all the little goodies. We had two weeks and are tested on them Wednesday. Then we start the muscles and have two weeks to memorize them and do the discection on a cat for the practical on muscles. Good luck!
  3. by   colleen10
    Hi NRN101,

    Yupper, we did have to memorize foramens, fissures, processes the works. I think that was even harder than just memorizing the bones themselves.
  4. by   nursing 101
    OMG!
    And I was ranting and raving that only our school had to do it! lol I guess I looked pretty stupid... But I did get a "B" on the lab test. We are now dissecting a mink another annoying thing. They don't relate to human muscles... What's the point?
  5. by   xantha31669
    I just noticed that someone mentioned MARIEB (dstudent, I think)
    Well she taught A & P at our school! Our science and nursing building is even named after her. I never had her but can you imagine having the professor that wrote the book you're using. YUCK!
  6. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by JennyRN2B
    Okay guys,

    I am here to test out your suggestions. I begin A&P I in Jan. I am looking to get a head start on the class. What should I start memeorizing first? Any helpful hints or tips to get me going would be GREATLY appreciated AS ALWAYS!!
    :kiss

    Thanks,
    Jen
    Jen, great suggestions by other posters.. I was wondering if you can get your books for this class beforehand? Especially if there is a "used" book in the bookstore, check to make sure that your class is using the same book. You will prob. have to purchase a "new" lab book, but I would check first.

    Bones and muscles would be the first thing, Kreb's cycle, ATP, etc..

    Good Luck, Marie
  7. by   Mkue
    Originally posted by xantha31669
    I just noticed that someone mentioned MARIEB (dstudent, I think)
    Well she taught A & P at our school! Our science and nursing building is even named after her. I never had her but can you imagine having the professor that wrote the book you're using. YUCK!
    Loved that book, would have been interesting to have her as an instructor ! so cool
  8. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Mkue,
    I can hear prof.Marieb now......."it's all on the test"..........."The text is the syllabus"..........""Of course my test question didn't contradict the book.........I was misquoted"
    That must blow chunks,sorry to here of your misfortune.


    Jen,


    Quoted from Angus

    Anatomy is structure, Physiology is function
    I will add to that and maybe link what several others are trying to say. Some anatomist made an observational statement:

    "Form follows function"

    That's why the crests,protuberances,fossas,foramen and such are important. That knowledge will also help you distinguish between an Ulna and a Radius,the acromial and sternal ends of a clavicle,the ethmoid and sphenoid,a lumbar vertebra from a thoracic and on and on.

    I would say to wait on identifying muscles until you can picture origins(stationary connection of a muscle to tendon or directly to bone) and an insertion(moveable portion/leverage point) of a muscle directly on the model so you can compare landmarks with the angles in the diagram.

    The first day of lab when they discuss muscles compare the angles in the diagram with how it looks in the lab model and you will be amazed.


    Look at your syllabus,student guide,or email your instructor,but the foundations of Human anatomy are anatomy of types of cells,tissues and organs. That is the basic structural hierarchy of all you will study about anatomy.

    Example:
    Cardiac muscle tissue is much different from skeletal muscle tissue because the cells are much different,therefore the organ of the heart is very different from a biceps muscle.....which then leads us to the study of thier physiology.

    So,since form fits function;study types of cells,then tissues and when your ready after a working knowledge of bone tissue and how it's formed...................you are ready to look at organs like a bone,the muscle that has its origin on its protuberance,and the pathways of the chemical reactions that create its movement.


    Do you know that I envy you?

    There's only an API and an APII and I have completed them




  9. by   JennyRN2B
    Whew!! Once again guys, thanks! The knowledge and suggestions here never cease to amaze me!

    Peeps,
    I think I need to get back into school just so I can get through your replies! :chuckle I had to read it twice, but I think I got it. I will remember to look for those things.

    I put a call into the head of the dept. to see if he had any suggestions. I still haven't heard anything. I will call again if he doesn't call back.

    Schedule comes out today! I will be starting before I know it!

    Entrance exam....here I come!

    Jenny
  10. by   RNIAM
    erinslone
    Excellent idea.I am taking my camera in today. Thank you so much!
  11. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Jen,

    You'll get a reply from your instructor before the head of the dept will bother. I'm sure the instructor is prepared to give out that information. Each instructor will teach the course a little diferrently and use the same text,so that will be the most valid. If you know the text that will be used,get it(if you're like me you already have it) and read the sections that interest you. Before you obtain an actual studyguide(at my school you can buy one in the bookstore),or a response from the instructor,you can't be for sure where to start,but I can't see how anybody could have a basis for studying anatomy without the standard................Cells make up tissues...........those specialized cells and the tissues they form make an organ..................those cells that make up that tissue that make up that organ.............have a specific function .

    If you start by studying types of cells,I can't see how that wouldn't help,but the skeletal system is extensive.

    About the camera.....................I bought a digital camcorder. I can burn the edited movie onto a dvd with some software that came with it. That way I had my questions and my instructors comments on audio.

    VERY helpful when we studied the lump of flesh called a cat that was so vague.
    Last edit by Peeps Mcarthur on Oct 23, '02
  12. by   HISSYTHECAT
    Thanks guys for the different tips. I will be starting Anatomy soon and I never thought about a camera or a camcorder. That would be great if we can use those!!
    you guys are awesome:O)
  13. by   Peeps Mcarthur
    Jen,
    My lecture instructor scheduled a time and everything to do a video on the models..............my lab teacher was a hard case and only let me run to each model during lab review like a reporter trying to get a story. She didn't accomodate me at all.

    My lecture instructor got an assortment of Godiva choclates.

    My lab instructor got diddly

    Depends on the instructor whether they let you film. Just assure them you would never give anybody a copy until it was edited and approved by them for content.

    Then again,if your instructor is one of those ego maniacal doc wannabees,then you have yourself a full length feature film!:roll

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