Everyone Won't Succeed. And That's Okay! - page 4

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

8,928 Views | 52 Comments

Everyone is capable of academic success, but some people arrive at the table better prepared than others. The controversial truth is that not all people will succeed in school, no matter how badly some individuals may want... Read More


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    It's really not okay to not succeed. All your money goes down the drain and what do you have to show for it? Nothing
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    Stanford Economist Thomas Sowell grew up as an African-American, years ago in the Deep South without any indoor plumbing until the age of nine years old. Dr. Sowell worked during the day and went to college at night.

    "80 percent of "poor" households have air-conditioning today, which less than half the population of America had in 1970. Nearly three-quarters of households in poverty own a motor vehicle, and nearly one-third own more than one motor vehicle.
    Virtually everyone living in "poverty," as defined by the government, has color television, and most have cable TV or satellite TV. More than three-quarters have either a VCR or a DVD player, and nearly nine-tenths have a microwave oven."

    ND:

    Most people do not realize that when poverty stats are published, various government assistance programs, such as Food stamps, Medicaid, and the like are not counted in those stats. In fact, the average poor individual in the United States has more living space than a Middle class individual does in Western Europe........ I know, I used to work in a large metro county welfare building. Most money that goes to welfare, goes to the pockets of government bureaucrats, in the form of salaries and benefits, only $.28 out of every dollar goes to the individual in need. In my experience, most of the individuals that come to the public assistance building are very young individuals, not seniors. We were lucky to see a senior twice a year, if we saw them that much, every blue moon. My mom had a very tough life by police standards and was able to get outstanding grades in school, in the early 60's. The nonsense that children who live in poverty cannot learn, is just that, complete nonsense. My Dad who became a Chemist, was one of 12 children with a mom and Dad, who worked as a firefighter, no, they did not make the same money as the current firefighters. No, his parents did not go to college, his mom graduated from the 8th grade, that is what they did in those days. They did not tolerate the nonsense and misbehavior that today's parents tolerate....... Where I went to school, students who back talked the teacher were going to face some angry parents when they came home, it was not going to be pleasant. It is beyond me why we tolerate the obnoxious behavior of thugs and criminals, as well as self entitled children.
    SoldierNurse22 likes this.
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    Quote from NDXUFan
    "80 percent of "poor" households have air-conditioning today, which less than half the population of America had in 1970. Nearly three-quarters of households in poverty own a motor vehicle, and nearly one-third own more than one motor vehicle.
    Virtually everyone living in "poverty," as defined by the government, has color television, and most have cable TV or satellite TV. More than three-quarters have either a VCR or a DVD player, and nearly nine-tenths have a microwave oven."
    I'm surprised you didn't include cell phones. Color TVs haven't been considered luxury items since 1985. Air conditioners, cars, color TVs, VCRs, and DVD players can be found very cheap, or free, either secondhand or through charity.
    JJStudent, BrandonLPN, and TheCommuter like this.
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    Quote from BrandonLPN

    The people who emerge from the truly impoverished parts of our society to become financially and academically successful are such a tiny percentage that they can safely be called the exception that proves the rule.

    We live in a society. And every society since the beginning of time has economic classes. The wealthy elite among these classes has an obvious interest in maintaining this status quo. Our society is no different. Why do you think the poor more or less remain poor generation after generation, while the rich remain rich? It's clearly offensive to suggest that the poor who fail to rise above their station fail to do so because they lack "gumption", or whatever. Yet this is exactly what one suggests when one implies that we "all" have equal opportunity to become doctors, lawyers, etc. It is not a coincidence that the vast majority of doctors come from, at least, an upper-middle class background, while the "Ernies" of America gravitate toward less glamorous careers. Not only does Ernie have "hurdles" to overcome in his quest to become a doctor, there are also so many parts of society that, by design or not, will simply prevent someone from Ernie's background from ever doing so. Since we're talking about education, let's take a look at our school system.

    Schools are funded by local property taxes. Kids born in the posh suburbs attend, from the start, the best funded, staffed and supplied schools in the country. These are the kids who get their own ipads, the smallest classrooms and the highest paid, most educated teachers. Kids in working class suburbs will attend lees spectacular, but still decent, schools. Kids born in inner city Detroit have almost zero local property tax revenue for their schools, so they get to attend broken down, glorified daycare centers where making it out alive without getting shot or stabbed is a "win". And you're gonna tell me that if Ernie in inner city Detroit would only reach for the stars, and want his dreams bad enough, then "outside influences" would be enough to make him a doctor? Come, now. To simply survive and stay out of prison in places like Detroit or inner city LA or whatever requires an incredible amount of intelligence, wit and resourcefulness. The kids who do so are already successful in life, even if they're high school dropouts. Their staying alive took a heck of a lot more effort and presence of mind than the rich kid who went to medical school could ever dream of.
    AMEN!!!

    Thank you for this post!!!!

    My rant of the YEAR...maybe for the next years is for people to REALLY go into these areas with out the sound bites, vitriol, and politicism/partisan BS...and look at these areas OBJECTIVELY...and you would agree with the OP and THIS post REALISTICALLY.

    To disagree is to continue the hamster wheel of fantasy.

    Each counter argument on "choice" is how to copse when no bank wants to do business in a place that has NO money pumping out of it??? Oh, the business is pushing the poor out of the way and to claim land to more "prosperous" individuals...google redlining...where do they go???what "choices" do the have when the one with the economic power pushes you to the way side??? NONE.

    *off soapbox*
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    The only issue that I have with this article is that it implies that one must be a college grad to be "successful" and that its okay to "settle" for a job that doesn't require skill or a degree because those jobs are needed. It also seems as if the author expects Earnie to fail because of his background.
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    Quote from subee
    Head start is not very successful. The gains kids make pre-kindergarten start to flatten out by the third grade and very few find long-term "success". After their head-start program, they still have all the problems they had before plus being enrolled in poorly performing schools.
    True...I don't even want to get into the reasons why it flattens out and what the information is extrapolated into-projection of prisions in a given area.
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    Quote from Bea40448
    The only issue that I have with this article is that it implies that one must be a college grad to be "successful" and that its okay to "settle" for a job that doesn't require skill or a degree because those jobs are needed. It also seems as if the author expects Earnie to fail because of his background.
    Maybe it's me, but I think that there will ALWAYS a need for skilled jobs; that doesn't mean "failure" to be; I will need that plumber; I want skilled worker to help keep infrastructure intact and maintained; when I want to enjoy a vacation or a nice night out, I want someone to give me excellent service; a human touch in whatever they are doing...I think that Commuter touched in that pretty well.

    There are many populations in this country with the cards stacked against them, and it gets higher when you put in the mix of redlining, preconceived ideologies about the poor, politics, and bureaucracy. That's is a reality that cannot be ignored.

    Eveyone has a place in society, whether a "skilled" professional or a "technical" professional; meaning, whether skilled, art, or scientist, one should be able to succeed and thrive-unfortunately, it's just not happening.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and TheCommuter like this.
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    In response to the original post.......sounds to me like erin is going to grow up and become a great doctor someday! these are the children who are under priviledged and have a disadvantage from the start, and once this is realized, these are the students who will work twice as hard to acheive their goals. I know i did!
    iluvgusgus likes this.
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    Quote from Bea40448
    The only issue that I have with this article is that it implies that one must be a college grad to be "successful" and that its okay to "settle" for a job that doesn't require skill or a degree because those jobs are needed.
    Not exactly. A person can thrive and succeed without a college education. Many small business owners and skilled tradesmen are successful without having ever attended college.

    Quote from Bea40448
    It also seems as if the author expects Earnie to fail because of his background.
    Your perception of the article is your reality, and that's okay. By the way, I'm the author. I should also mention that I'm an African-American female who comes from a lower working-class background. I succeeded in spite of dysfunction in the household (parental drug abuse, occasional domestic violence issues, etc.).

    However, many people would not consider me a success story with my LVN diploma and associate of science in nursing. To some people, anything less than a baccalaureate degree is ineffectual. To others, anything less than a graduate degree is ineffectual.
    ProfRN4, AmyRN303, PaintedWings♥, and 1 other like this.
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    Yes, you are correct Yes, cell phones and other material goods should be included.


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