Everyone Won't Succeed. And That's Okay! Everyone Won't Succeed. And That's Okay! - pg.4 | allnurses

Everyone Won't Succeed. And That's Okay! - page 4

Everyone is capable of academic success, but some people arrive at the table better prepared than others. The controversial truth is that not all people will succeed in school, no matter how... Read More

  1. Visit  NDXUFan profile page
    0
    Yes, you are correct Yes, cell phones and other material goods should be included.
  2. Visit  NDXUFan profile page
    1
    Many high skill blue collar positions earn more in income than a number of college degree holders.
    EbonyWaltonEl likes this.
  3. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person profile page
    1
    So how exactly does one become a plumber? I'm from Boston, where the trades are a closed shop. If you want to earn decent money or work on any government projects, you need to join the union, which requires family connections. Otherwise, you're competing with illegal immigrants, who will work under the table very cheap.

    Learning a blue collar trade is not the panacea people think it is.
    LadyFree28 likes this.
  4. Visit  PTKChic profile page
    0
    Very nice. If only politicians and educational leaders cam get a read at this. Maybe they'd stop shoving college down everyone's throats.
  5. Visit  cannolis profile page
    0
    Just a note: Just because you fail at something doesn't mean you can't try again. Success comes with many failures. Nothing brings you closer to success than failure does. Failure teaches you what doesn't work. So just adjust and change accordingly.
  6. Visit  NDXUFan profile page
    0
    As a college grad, you are correct.
  7. Visit  2bAngilRN profile page
    0
    Quote from Heathermaizey
    Yes, the world needs tradesman. But let me tell you my ex who is a HVAC guy with his own business has a 2-year degree in it and makes much more money than probably 85% of the people in this country. He sacrificed everything for his business. We had a paid for home, a paid for summer home, 3 paid for cars, and lots of money in the bank. I didn't work and I could spend whatever I wanted, when I wanted. Did money make us happy? The answer is no. Behind the perfect life, lay a life of disarray. Now, he's lost his family, and losing half of his fortune. Now, I will have to worry about money for the first time in a long time, and you know what? I've never been happier. Success is measured differently by different people. My ex valued money, I value security and happiness.
    You say your ex lost his family and half his fortune. How come?
  8. Visit  ProfRN4 profile page
    6
    Quote from TheCommuter
    However, many people would not consider me a success story with my LVN diploma and associate of science in nursing. To some people, anything less than a baccalaureate degree is ineffectual. To others, anything less than a graduate degree is ineffectual.
    This is the mentality that irks me so much lately, the college = success mentality. Yes, commuter, you are a success. And yes, I agree, that the world is full of very necessary jobs that do not require a college degree. With the cost, competition and rigor of a college education these days, it is just not a feasible option for everyone. I am frustrated with the current wave of the "I can be anything I want to be" attitude. No, you cannot be anything you want, sorry. There I said it. Wanting it is not enough. Good grades are not enough. A bachelors degree is not even good enough. While an education is never wasted, in my opinion, it is not the end-all be-all measure of success.

    Signed, the PhD student who will never make as much money as some people I know with no college degree.
  9. Visit  NDXUFan profile page
    0
    Yes, you are correct, the mantra of college equals success is alot of B.S. . Yes, I have been to grad school.
  10. Visit  SmoothKeys profile page
    0
    Quote from ProfRN4
    I am frustrated with the current wave of the "I can be anything I want to be" attitude. No, you cannot be anything you want, sorry. There I said it.

    While an education is never wasted, in my opinion, it is not the end-all be-all measure of success.

    Signed, the PhD student who will never make as much money as some people I know with no college degree.
    I tend to disagree with this type of thinking. Look no further than this site and the success stories are moving; they are about individuals who persevered and especially of those who failed and refused to give up again. Sometimes the failure was for reasons that were non-academic at all. They are about people who figured out nursing is for them, but it is also about individuals who are honest about their capabilities to withstand the rigors of a nursing program.

    Indeed, famed neurosurgeon, Dr. Benjamin Carson background was supposed to lead him to failure. His brother went on to become a successful mechanical engineer, too. But that's because they both were honest with their intellectual aptitude. In organic chemistry, especially, I cursed it in undergrad and appreciated certain concepts later in medicinal chemistry. Yet, I won't be a part of a drug design team. If someone follows a goal through (out of passion or necessity), he/she is a success. I dream of being an engineer (I think I'm honest with my ability to learn) but my circumstances dictate a nursing career is likely (and I've been saying this since last year, meaning I need to make the jump already). This is one case where success will be out of necessity and there's a part of me that feels guilty about this. But as you've said loosely, I'm the competition.
  11. Visit  emtb2rn profile page
    1
    "The purpose of your life may just be to serve as a warning to others" Demotivators.
    BrandonLPN likes this.
  12. Visit  NeoNatMom profile page
    0
    Quote from iluvgusgus
    Success does not necessarily have to be academic. I would say I am an "Ernie" and although my parents were not well educated and struggled financially, I learned that I did not want the same life and I chose to study hard in school. Many kids born with a silver spoon in their mouths do not choose to "succeed" academically either and they have all the advantages in the world. I think it is a mix of nature vs nurture when it comes to academic success and it comes down to an individual choosing to do well in school. If it is important to them, a person will do well. I have also gone to school with other disadvantaged individuals who were made fun of in elementary school for being "dumb" and who later chose to study hard and rise to the top of the class.
    I definitely agree with you! A lot comes into play when it comes to overall success of any one human being. I mean, the true story of the Pursuit of Happiness is a perfectly good example. My parents weren't academic, my mom is on welfare and my dad used to make 6 figures through self taught repairs of printing presses but they unfortunately are out dated now and he struggles a bit to make ends meet. My mother lacks determination while my father didnt. I saw the difference in lifestyles of both of my parents growing up and it was abundantly clear which life I wanted for me and my future family. I learn from other's mistakes; I am going to school to have a stable job that I enjoy, unlike my mother; and I'm going into a field that will never be out dated, unlike my father. And as you said, it was my choosing to make this life happen for myself, not my parents. I personal would not teach my child that it's a good thing to be complacent and not push themselves to get a higher education than high school. Educational background provides more options and I would want my child to have options.
  13. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    1
    Quote from NeoNatMom
    I am going to school to have a stable job that I enjoy, unlike my mother; and I'm going into a field that will never be out dated, unlike my father.
    Never say never.

    Nursing is no longer a stable career pathway since there are a disturbing number of new grads who cannot secure employment during the first year after graduation. In addition, nursing might very become outdated or evolve to the point that significantly less nurses are needed in the coming decades. Never say never!
    LadyFree28 likes this.

close
close