Your employer's policy re: *snow and ice*? - page 4

Hi, I would really appreciate hearing from lots of people about what you do when you have to work but the roads are covered in snow and ice. I get many sarcastic or unrealistic responses from people... Read More

  1. by   catlady
    Wow, this thread is reminding me of why I moved from New England to Arizona this year. It's mid-November and it's going to be in the 80s today.

    I spent years worrying and obsessing about snow and driving to work in it, yet in all those years I never had a weather-related accident. I even bought a four-wheel drive just for snow, but never found it all that helpful. I think I did better in my little Nova with front-wheel drive. Maybe because the center of gravity on an SUV is too high.

    I agree with everyone else who said to leave early and drive carefully. I even got permission to bring my 7-year-old to work with me for one snowstorm; we put her in an empty ICU bed. I'd never do that again. Another time I called out because I was truly sick, and it was assumed that I skipped out because of the weather. So I dragged myself in the next night so they could see for themselves that I wasn't dogging it due to snow.

    But I hate snow now. Used to love it as a kid. I always got mad when I'd turn on the weather report looking for advice on how to get to work and I'd hear, "Oh, everyone just stay home." As if that is ever an option for a hospital nurse.

    I'd have to live next door to my employer before I'd ever live in a snow state again.
  2. by   Daytonite
    Quote from fergus51
    I'm from Canada. . .now that I live in California. 2 inches of rain and they act like it's a new ice age or something.
    :yeahthat: But, you know, I've seen a couple of people hydroplaning on the wet roads out here. When the winter rain hits it will be a circus again.
  3. by   lifsavER67
    I live in rural Eastern Kentucky and drive 30 miles each way to work. We have a Ramada Inn directly across the street from the hospital. Our hospital graciously lets us stay there when bad weather hits, two employees per room. Snow, ice, floods, whatever. They even provide a meal at the cafeteria for stranded folks.
    Any call in r/t weather is unexcused because accomodations are offered. The supervisor is usually calling each department to ask who is staying and I have even had them call when bad weather is predicted to have us come in early.
    They are really good about it.
  4. by   jayne109
    Quote from Someday-C.R.N.A.
    I totally agree with a previous poster about having good tires, only would like to add:

    -Ask about WINTER tires and SUMMER tires. Depending on the vehicle, there may be a difference.
    -Keep an eye on your tire PRESSURE. Tire pressures will fluctuate during seasonal temperature changes, so you need to ask a professional what is best for your vehicle.


    As for chains, they are great if you are allowed to use them. Individual states allow them during certain months, all year long, or not at all. Be sure to check your local laws. (You can usually find this info in any decent road atlas).

    Two words: Snow studs! I put snow studded tires on my car (right now, a mustang but 2 years ago I had a ford escape with 4 wheel drive. We had a very bad icy winter and I had no trouble at all) and Do fairly well. Well worth a little extra time and money for them, here in MO. Put sand in your trunk if you have a rear wheel drive car, too.

    There are people in our hospital that voluntarily will give rides with their bigger snow equipped vehicles. You have to be ready to go early and stay late at your job. There is a list in security of these people that will do this. You might look into helping start this type of program in your hosptial.

    just my thoughts as I am taking a break from cleaning house (something I hate to do)

    Melissa
  5. by   Psychaprn
    Quote from nervousnurse
    Hi, I would really appreciate hearing from lots of people about what you do when you have to work but the roads are covered in snow and ice. I get many sarcastic or unrealistic responses from people I've asked. I should explain that snow and ice are still somewhat new to me, AND I have driven in a HORRIBLE ice storm and am still somewhat traumatized!

    Once when I wasn't scheduled to work, the roads were treacherous and I was SO grateful to be off! When I asked my coworkers about it the next day, they said "they weren't that bad, I just drove slowly!" I'm happy for them, but I have slipped all over roads, even when I went slowly, and even slid through stop signs.....and it is SCARY!

    I asked a paramedic what they do when there is an emergency out on rural roads that haven't been salted, and she said there's not much they can do, and maybe it's just that person's time to die......gee, what a great answer! (NOT!) :angryfire

    I applied for a new job and asked the manager about snow and ice, and she said: "I *ALWAYS* make it into work, NO MATTER how bad the roads are, and I live a lot further than you!" The thing is, I am dedicated to my job, but I am *NOT* willing to slip and slide on icy roads and risk my life......

    So please tell me......what is your employer's view on this, and what do YOU do when the roads are just terrible?
    PLEASE DON'T BE TALKED INTO THE OLD-"TAKE IT ON THE CHIN AND DO IT FOR THE PATIENTS" PHOILOSOPHY SPOUTED BY SOME STAFF OR ADMINISTRATION. YOUR GETTING IN AN ACCIDENT OR ARRIVING AT WORK TERRIFIED IS GOOD FOR NO ONE. I AGREE A WINTER DRIVING COURSE MIGHT HELP-CHECK WITH AAA. IF THE HOSPITAL DOESN'T CARE ENOUGH ABOUT YOU OR THE PATIENTS TO HAVE A SAFE VEHICLE PICK YOU UP AND BRING YOU HOME-CALL IN SICK OR TAKE A PERSONAL DAY-IF ANYONE GIVES YOU ANY GRIEF-TOO BAD. NURSES HAVE ENDANGERED THEMSELVES AND BEEN MARTYRS FOR TOO LONG-RESPECT YOURSELF AND YOUR NEED TO FEEL SAFE!
  6. by   nervousnurse
    Wow, thanks to everyone who responded. I had no idea there were classes I could take----I will have to look into that for sure! THANKS!
  7. by   Super_RN
    If the roads are bad, the sheriffs department will come and pick us up to take us to work. Usually my boyfriend (if he's not at work) or my neighbor will take me to work. Then I can hitch a ride home in the morning. I live on top of a big curvy hill that is usually not cleared.
    Super
  8. by   The Y factor
    Quote from ruby vee
    nursing is a 24/7/365 job, even when the roads are bad. someone has to be there to take care of the patients, and when you're scheduled to work, that someone is you.

    make sure you have good tires -- even a subaru will slip and slide if the tires are poor. and a fwd or 4wd vehicle helps in the snow. so do chains. buy a set and learn how to put them on. learn how to drive in the snow -- driving slowly and carefully is only part of it. if you know there's an ice storm coming, go in to work early, or stay there overnight. rent a room nearby or stay with a friend who also has to work.

    if you absolutely cannot bring yourself to drive to work in the snow and ice, get a different job, move closer to work or relocate to the deep south, because winter is a fact of life.

    ruby


    i am fortunate enough not to worry about snow, but i do not see the benefit to risking my life and becoming a potential pt. this would count as an act of god and i think you should try your best but i would not risk my life for any amount of money. if your employer valued you, your life, and your family they would not want you to endanger yourself beyond your comfort levels. ruby it sounds like brainwashing sheeesh
  9. by   gizelda196
    It is definitely a judgement call. I know a few nurses who have such anxiety that for them to get behind a wheel would be the biggest mistake. They stay home and we understand. After all we are human not superhuman and nursing is your job not your life.I have made most storms,left early from home,stayed over at work if I had care for my kids(They are my priority not my job) I have learned over the years there are no heros.Idon't try to be one any more.You want to try and go in when 50 foot waves are going over the peninsula be my quest. I will go in for a basic nor'easter but if it is ice and looks like I wont get back in my town forget about it. Most of the storms here in Boston the main roads are clear by afternoon and life returns to normal pretty quickly. but there was those select few that was scary. Nurses that lived real close to the hospital I mean within 1 mile were called and if they could the city picked them up and got them home. Staff that could stay did staff that couldnt went home before the roads got to bad.
    I have an AWD suv. It doesnt mean any thing if you dont know how to drive it. I have literally been run off the road by some jerk who thought that 15 miles an hour down an unplowed road was to slow he road my ass scared the crap out of me gave me the finger as he passed and didnt even stop , when i skidded over and hit a pile of snow. There are alot of people out on the road and it has become dangerous to get behind the wheel and try to drive. And most of the time it isnt a little noreaster it is the drivers.People are just plain mean today road rage is huge .
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from the y factor
    i am fortunate enough not to worry about snow, but i do not see the benefit to risking my life and becoming a potential pt. this would count as an act of god and i think you should try your best but i would not risk my life for any amount of money. if your employer valued you, your life, and your family they would not want you to endanger yourself beyond your comfort levels. ruby it sounds like brainwashing sheeesh


    while ice, snow, and even beautiful, sunny days could be construed as acts of god, ice and snow are also a fact of life to millions of us. just as tornadoes are to some, hurricanes are to others, etc. if you want to live in an area that enjoys winter, you need to get comfortable with driving in ice and snow. because if i'm at work waiting for relief after a 12 hour shift, i'm not going to be really happy to hear "jane decided not to come to work because she didn't feel comfortable driving in snow." nor is jane going to be real comfortable refusing to leave her house for three or four months of the year!

    brainwashing? no. it's common sense!
  11. by   gizelda196
    some people just should not be behind the wheel period never mind behind the wheel if they suffer snow anxiety or road rage. i am sorry , if you choose to work in the middle a blizzard that is your problem . you go in to work in treacherous condition good for you. but i will use my own judgement. some days the answer is no,i will not go out in the blizzard and risk my life for a job. staffing is not my problem it is the hospitals. if you go in expect to stay they don't tell you that for a reason, they tell you that because they know people just wont come in. no job is worth making a dumb decision,like
    to go out in a blizzard when the roads are gone and the state police are on the news saying dont drive.

    Quote from ruby vee
    while ice, snow, and even beautiful, sunny days could be construed as acts of god, ice and snow are also a fact of life to millions of us. just as tornadoes are to some, hurricanes are to others, etc. if you want to live in an area that enjoys winter, you need to get comfortable with driving in ice and snow. because if i'm at work waiting for relief after a 12 hour shift, i'm not going to be really happy to hear "jane decided not to come to work because she didn't feel comfortable driving in snow." nor is jane going to be real comfortable refusing to leave her house for three or four months of the year!

    brainwashing? no. it's common sense!
  12. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from gizelda
    some people just should not be behind the wheel period never mind behind the wheel if they suffer snow anxiety or road rage. i am sorry , if you choose to work in the middle a blizzard that is your problem . you go in to work in treacherous condition good for you. but i will use my own judgement. some days the answer is no,i will not go out in the blizzard and risk my life for a job. staffing is not my problem it is the hospitals. if you go in expect to stay they don't tell you that for a reason, they tell you that because they know people just wont come in. no job is worth making a dumb decision,like
    to go out in a blizzard when the roads are gone and the state police are on the news saying dont drive.
    the original poster wasn't talking about blizzards where the roads are gone and the state police are on the news saying don't drive. we were discussing snow and ice and winter driving conditions . . . not a disaster of epic proportions. i stand by my statement that if you're going to choose to live in the snowbelt and work in a hospital, you need to make sure you can get to work when the roads are covered with ice and snow. that's not a blizzard. that's just winter. your co-workers can only cover so much for your fear of winter driving.
  13. by   fergus51
    ITA Ruby. You can't live in a place that gets a lot of snow and NOT learn to drive in it without it seriously affecting your life. If I didn't drive in normal snow back home, I would only have worked about 8 months of the year.

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