Would you do anything about it? - page 3

I met someone today at a friend's house who said, "I've gotta get back to work. I work at (name of facility). I'm a nurse." I replied with, "oh, I was told you were a nurse's aide." She said,... Read More

  1. by   gitterbug
    You got to report it. Deep down you know that already, so just do it. You may save someone from harm and actually help this person face some problems.
  2. by   arizonanurse
    I wouldn't, but then again, I'm not into reporting anyone. So many times, actions can be misinterpreted. Yesterday, when I was at work, my mom called because my little brother was having some symptoms that she was concerned about. I talked to her about it and told her, "Oh, don't worry, it sounds like it's just the flu." It didn't occur to me until later than any of my coworkers who overheard the conversation would assume I was giving a phone diagnosis to a patient.

    Now, I'm not saying this is the case with your friend - honestly, she does sound guilty - but are you one thousand percent sure? It's so easy to make a snap judgment that seems clear as day, but you may end up regretting acting on it. Now, if she was a CNA in your facility and was telling patients she's a nurse and giving out meds, then you would need to step in. But in this situation, I would just let it go.
  3. by   Daytonite
    i wouldn't have any problem calling the facility and narc to her boss on her, especially since you heard her say "i've gotta get back to work. i work at (name of facility). i'm a nurse." and "make sure you take that z-pak i brought you."

    first of all, what's she doing off the premises of the facility? most places i worked had strict rules about leaving the facility during breaks. true, many nursing homes allow aides to leave the premises, but only on time that they are clocked out.

    second, who gets a z-pak and gives it away? granted, she might have gotten it from her own doctor in the past, but i'm too old, have seen too much and been a supervisor and manager too long. i would have asked her where she got it. if i got a z-pak from a doctor, which is antibiotics, i'd have used it.

    as a supervisor and manager i've seen a number of incidents of people who leave work unnoticed and who steal everything but the kitchen sink from employers. it's always amazing when they brag about or flaunt it to others like it's a noble thing to be doing. if she stole that z-pak from the facility, it no doubt came from a patient who will end up paying for it. how is that right? report what you heard her say and let the facility sort out the details. even if she is only a cna, she still has some certification responsibilities that she has to uphold when she interacts with others.

    you can verify any cnas certification on your state nurse aide registry as well. you can get a link to it over on one of the "stickys" on the cna-nursing assistant discussion forum or do an internet search for "[your state] nurse aide registry". report her to them also, but based on hearsay your complaint may not go very far.

    you can only get into trouble if you report something you are deliberately falsifying. reporting exactly what you heard this goofball saying is your truthful observation and can't get you into trouble. the truth is a defense to any accusation of defamation (in case anyone worries reporting something like this can come back and bite you).
  4. by   dijaqrn
    Please call the BON and let them investigate this woman and her facility. If she has access to meds she may actually be dispensing at work or who knows what else with the facilities knowledge. I would not call the facility but I would notify the BON or state licensing agency, patients are at risk.
  5. by   CarVsTree
    Quote from earle58
    this needs to be nipped in the bud asap.
    call the bon and report it.

    leslie
    Ditto! Report her to the BON and the BO Pharmacists, while you're at it the Board of Medicine. She is acting (emphasis on acting) as a nurse, pharmacist, and physician and she is none of those things.

    Sounds like a right scary individual!
  6. by   santhony44
    If the medication was a sample,then someone at the facility- doctor, NP, or PA- signed for the medication and is responsible for it. They are supposed to keep a log of where the medication goes.

    Even a licensed nurse should not be taking medication out of the sample closet without the direction or permission of a provider (MD/NP/PA).

    It's not outside the realm of possibility, but I would be very surprised if this person approached a provider with "My friend/neighbor/sister-in-law has the flu, can I take her a Z-Pack?" and got a "sure, no problem!" type of answer.

    I would approach someone at the facility first- a clinic manager, nursing supervisor, or someone else in authority. I expect that they will take care of the problem quickly.

    She is playing around with other people's licenses, and even her own facility's ability to continue to operate. They need to know!!
  7. by   SCRN1
    Quote from santhony44
    If the medication was a sample,then someone at the facility- doctor, NP, or PA- signed for the medication and is responsible for it. They are supposed to keep a log of where the medication goes.

    Even a licensed nurse should not be taking medication out of the sample closet without the direction or permission of a provider (MD/NP/PA).

    It's not outside the realm of possibility, but I would be very surprised if this person approached a provider with "My friend/neighbor/sister-in-law has the flu, can I take her a Z-Pack?" and got a "sure, no problem!" type of answer.

    I would approach someone at the facility first- a clinic manager, nursing supervisor, or someone else in authority. I expect that they will take care of the problem quickly.

    She is playing around with other people's licenses, and even her own facility's ability to continue to operate. They need to know!!
    When I worked in a pediatric office, we weren't required to log anything out of the samples closet.
  8. by   edsdcs
    definately report it
  9. by   wonderbee
    She didn't identify herself as a professional nurse. She didn't claim she is an RN, LPN or LVN. Check the definition of the term "nurse". Any definition you google will be a broad one. Answers.com defines a nurse as "A person who is educated and trained to care for the sick and disabled." That covers a lot of territory. Think of the MA who works at a doctor's office. How often is she/he referred to as the "nurse"? These people have received education and training to care for the sick and disabled. The MD is usually the one who makes that representation. Does the BON intervene? The same holds true for the CNA. That's why we have exams and titles backed up with licenses. There is no professional designation of simply "nurse". I don't see where any laws are broken. I do think that the public's perception of nursing is changing as older generations die out. There is a stronger awareness and respect for what it takes to become a professional nurse. Sorry for the rant. I may have gone a little off point.

    I guess I wouldn't be so concerned that she casually refers to herself as a nurse on the outside. I would be very concerned if she does it while she's on the clock at work.
    Last edit by wonderbee on Feb 4, '07 : Reason: added a couple of things
  10. by   NurseCard
    Quote from SCRN1
    She works in a mental health center and it was samples that the drug reps give the doctors to dispense to patients.
    Oh my, do we know the same person? I work in a psych facility and I also know of an aide who goes around telling people she is really a nurse. No, I haven't reported this or anything. She also tells a lot of other tall tales.
  11. by   SCRN1
    Quote from RNKittyKat
    She didn't identify herself as a professional nurse. She didn't claim she is an RN, LPN or LVN. Check the definition of the term "nurse". Any definition you google will be a broad one. Answers.com defines a nurse as "A person who is educated and trained to care for the sick and disabled." That covers a lot of territory. Think of the MA who works at a doctor's office. How often is she/he referred to as the "nurse"? These people have received education and training to care for the sick and disabled. The MD is usually the one who makes that representation. Does the BON intervene? The same holds true for the CNA. That's why we have exams and titles backed up with licenses. There is no professional designation of simply "nurse". I don't see where any laws are broken. I do think that the public's perception of nursing is changing as older generations die out. There is a stronger awareness and respect for what it takes to become a professional nurse. Sorry for the rant. I may have gone a little off point.

    I guess I wouldn't be so concerned that she casually refers to herself as a nurse on the outside. I would be very concerned if she does it while she's on the clock at work.
    Wrong. She stated she was a nurse and when I told her I was told she was a nursing assistant, she said, "no, I am a nurse". This is one of the states that it's illegal in to identify yourself as a nurse. It says so everytime they mail out the form to renew your nursing license in and this is what I found on the internet from the State Board of Nursing in our state...

    SECTION 40-33-30. Licensing requirement; use of title "nurse"; exceptions; establishment of policies to cover special health care needs.

    (A) A person may not practice nursing without an active license issued in accordance with this chapter. A South Carolina license as an advanced practice registered nurse or registered nurse is required for a person located in another state to provide nursing services to a recipient located in this State at the time nursing services are provided. A licensee located in this State who provides nursing services to a recipient located in another state must be properly licensed in this State and comply with any applicable licensing requirements where the recipient of nursing services is located at the time the services are provided.

    (B) It is
    unlawful
    for a person to practice as an advanced practice registered nurse, a registered nurse, or a licensed practical nurse in this State, or to use the abbreviation "APRN", " RN", or "LPN" or any variation or subdesignation of these, or use any title, sign, card, or device to indicate that the person is a nurse, or that the person is practicing as a nurse, within the meaning of this chapter, unless the person is actively licensed under the provisions of this chapter.

    (C)
    A person may not use the word "nurse" as a title, or use an abbreviation to indicate that the person is practicing in this State as a nurse, unless the person is actively licensed as a nurse as provided for in this chapter. If the term "nurse" is part of a longer title, such as "nurse's aide", a person who is entitled to use that title shall use the entire title and may not abbreviate the title to " nurse".
    This does not prohibit the use of the title "nurse" by persons who hold a temporary permit pending licensure by endorsement from another jurisdiction, and it does not prohibit the use of the title "nurse" by persons enrolled in a board-approved refresher course for the purpose of obtaining an active South Carolina license.
  12. by   SCRN1
    P.S. She also illegally dispensed prescription medication.
  13. by   santhony44
    Quote from SCRN1
    When I worked in a pediatric office, we weren't required to log anything out of the samples closet.
    If she works in a mental health center, it is almost certainly supported by state and/or federal funds and is not a private office. If that is the case, then they are almost certainly under regulations that require a log be kept.

    A private office may not be required to keep a log. Publicly funded clinics don't have the same leeway.

close