Would it be tacky to advertise this?

  1. 0
    Among being a nurse practitioner student, I'm taking a course to become a licensed massage therapist. This is not a question about massage therapy, but a question more about how to advertise one's self, whether it is as a LNC, LMT, etc.. I am thinking about how to print up business cards, and I would like to show my credentials without seeming like I'm trying to be a show off or know-it-all. I wonder if it would be tacky to have a business card reading:

    Jane Doe, BSN, RN, LMT

    Any comments? Suggestions?

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  2. 15 Comments...

  3. 0
    If you earned em, show em off!
  4. 0
    nope. Looks fine to me.
  5. 2
    Question is, do you want to offer your RN services to your massage clients? Do you want them to assume as lay people do, that they will be getting a nursing assessment as well?

    I would just be clear on what your clients are to expect from you. This for more reasons than the obvious blurring of expectations.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and Libitina like this.
  6. 0
    I don't think it's tacky, but what services are you planning to offer? I don't see any reason why a massage therapist would also need to be a nurse, if you see what I mean? Is there some sort of implied added value there? I'd just have business cards that say licensed massage therapist, but that's just me. There's nothing wrong with tooting your own horn, but if you put it together on a business card like that you're implying that those are all services you offer to the client, whereas you may want to keep your nursing and your massage business separate.

    ETA: Clarify - I know a massage therapist doesn't have to be an RN. What I meant was that I don't see how a client would find that in particular to be a benefit to the massage therapist they choose.
  7. 1
    I know what you mean. For that matter, a person doesn't even need to be licensed to offer a good massage, but they do if they charge for it.

    I thouht about advertising massage therapy for pain management, maybe the extra title would inspire a little more confidence in the consumer that I am more expert in dealing with the workings of the body and medical issues. I will say, my MT course is a lot of fun and very enjoyable, but just from my studies it is obvious LMTs have nowhere near the knowledge base of registered nurses.
    MassED likes this.
  8. 0
    I can see why you would think that. I just don't know if the average layperson who schedules a massage cares about that. I don't, but maybe other people do.
  9. 0
    Quote from danceswithsnakes
    I know what you mean. For that matter, a person doesn't even need to be licensed to offer a good massage, but they do if they charge for it.

    I thouht about advertising massage therapy for pain management, maybe the extra title would inspire a little more confidence in the consumer that I am more expert in dealing with the workings of the body and medical issues. I will say, my MT course is a lot of fun and very enjoyable, but just from my studies it is obvious LMTs have nowhere near the knowledge base of registered nurses.
    Does anything about being a nurse mean that you'd do something different when it comes to the massage therapy? If not, this could be a misleading thing to your future consumers. Your position as a LMT is to give them a massage...not treat their pain, and it sounds like you're making that inference. I wouldn't go there.
  10. 1
    Quote from cherrybreeze
    Does anything about being a nurse mean that you'd do something different when it comes to the massage therapy? If not, this could be a misleading thing to your future consumers. Your position as a LMT is to give them a massage...not treat their pain, and it sounds like you're making that inference. I wouldn't go there.
    Several forms of massage are indeed used to treat pain...neuromuscular massage, for example, as well as hydrotherapy. Reflexology is also used to treat pain.
    MassED likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from danceswithsnakes
    Several forms of massage are indeed used to treat pain...neuromuscular massage, for example, as well as hydrotherapy. Reflexology is also used to treat pain.
    I understand that.

    My point was, is there anything about your nursing education that will directly be applied to your duties as a massage therapist? The example of treating pain by massage and also including your credentials implies more than just a "massage therapist" relationship, it gives the impression that you are then treating your client's medical conditions. That's where the line blurs. You can't diagnose a painful condition in either capacity (and back pain, for example, can have many causes) and by using your RN title as well, clients may get the impression that you can not only treat but diagnose and treat their pain. Does this make sense?


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