Why LPN?? - page 5

i often wondered why some people choose to become an lpn verses an rn, or why go for a 2 year program and just not go for 2 more years to get your bs? especially with the threatened lpn layoffs, the... Read More

  1. by   nurs4kids
    [QUOTE]Originally posted by NurseMark:
    [B] Susy,
    "First of all, it is women dominated, and like it or not, women are still second class citizens. Secondly, look at what nursing started out as. You are nothing but a physician's lackey - you can't breathe without an order from your "master" - the doctor (Hyperbolically speaking). The nurse was created to assist the physician with his or her duties - like wiping butts, emptying urinals, giving baths, giving pills, etc. Thirdly, the public views nurses as "maids" that are supposedly paid very well. "


    Mark, you humor me. You obviously attempt to build yourself by THINKING women are second class citizens. Women NEVER were second class citizens, dear(where on earth did you get that from?). I will not even get into the women vs men thing with you as to which sex is superior, because I have nothing to prove and I will not attack all men because of the ignorance of one. Secondly, I'm not sure what you do in your job, but as a RN, my skills rarely require a physician to "breathe". Yes, I need an order for medications, etc., but the assessment and the CARE I provide, are not anything a doctor can "order", these are God given talents. Thirdly, the public I know thinks very highly of nurses. If your attitude of nursing is the general concensus in your area, then the nurses there are responsible for what YOUR public thinks. Don't attempt to ruin the beautiful bunch with your one bad apple . As for the topic here, from which you strayed deeply, I do not have the pleasures of working with LPN's because my head nurse does not find it feasible d/t the restrictions our state places on their practice. With the nursing shortage upon us, as I attempt to care for my patients, like my "second class" heart wishes, I would welcome any LPN/LVN/CA at my side.

    [This message has been edited by nurs4kids (edited March 30, 2001).]

    [This message has been edited by nurs4kids (edited March 30, 2001).]
  2. by   Q.
    [quote]Originally posted by nurs4kids:
    [b]
    Originally posted by NurseMark:
    Susy, The nurse was created to assist the physician with his or her duties - like wiping butts, emptying urinals, giving baths, giving pills, etc."

    [This message has been edited by nurs4kids (edited March 30, 2001).]
    ?????????
    I guess I was under the impression that nursing was actually "created" by Florence Nightingale, as she took it upon herself to provide bedside and field care to the soldiers in the Crimean War.....

    Maybe I missed that topic in my nursing program......
  3. by   theboss
    hey guys lets here some great stories on ( nursing in your state?) it ought to be good!!! i think its fun and educational to learn about all the diffrent aspects of nursing in all states !!!!!! see ya there.
    the boss
  4. by   camos
    Thank you Suzy K, you are right, I went over board, PMS time, sorry!
    took it the wrong way, forgive?
    Originally posted by Susy K:
    God, let it DIE already.............

    [This message has been edited by Susy K (edited March 30, 2001).]
  5. by   Q.
    Originally posted by camos:
    Thank you Suzy K, you are right, I went over board, PMS time, sorry!
    took it the wrong way, forgive?

    Camos-
    Forgiven!
  6. by   lpnandloveit1
    I have been an lpn for 24 years and have watched the profession change greatly in those years. I think the reason I became an Lpn vs. an Rn is because team nursing was "all the rage" at the time. I was a "Nursing assistan" in the hospital at the time and thought that I was best suited to be an lpn on the team. Since then I have seen movement in the postion. I currently work as a homecare nurse caring for "pediatric high tech cases" and i seems that I have come full circle and once again a member of a nursing team. I am paid well and as I have been "at this" for a long time I can pick and choose the hours that I work( I do shift cases not visits.). I may or may not go back to school the get my Rn but right now I love my job. I guess that is why I became an Lpn, I love it!
  7. by   mommy2
    Originally posted by Duckie:Hi, I was wondering if I could ask you a few small questions. I also quit school early ( earlier than 16 even) and am sooo close to registering for an lpn course the only problem is that I don't know exactly what their job description is, I've always wanted to work in a hospital is it true that lpn's do not work in hospitals? Thank-you for your time also if you have any more advice or info you think might come in handy for me I'd love to hear it. Tank-you again
    I actually had two reasons for becoming an LPN. First, I really thought nursing was what I wanted to do but having never done it, wasn't sure and figured if it wasn't, then it wouldn't be as expensive or take as long to find out. My main reason was because I had quite school when I was only 16, so my education was very limited and I was afraid I couldn't cut it education wise. But thank the dear Lord, I did very good in school and once I got into it, I liked where I was and what I was doing and just didn't feel the need to go on. If I were younger and didn't need to work full time, I would get my RN now, but only for the reasons of when I get too old to cut the long hours and then I could go into teaching, which I love to do even now. I really enjoy showing the new nurses the ropes. Even though I have lots of experience I cannot teach and that makes me sad. But I'll keep plugging away until I can't hobble down those long halls anymore. I think the war between LPN's and RN's is truly a waste of good energy. This profession is big enough for all of us and we are all very much needed. I have never had problems finding a job and I am thankful for what I can do.
  8. by   jo1998
    Originally posted by Susy K:
    I often wondered why some people choose to become an LPN verses an RN, or why go for a 2 year program and just not go for 2 more years to get your BS? Especially with the threatened LPN layoffs, the lower pay, the limited employment choices. Is it money? Is it wanting to get your ability to work sooner? Please enlighten me. Thanks.
    Here in NJ the pay difference isn't that much. After reading posts about salaries, I can happily say that I make more than RN's that posted. Our units are mostly staffed with 1 RN and 3 LPN's. LPN's are in demand in Phila., NJ, NY, what layoffs are you referring to? My practice allows me to practice the same as an RN, only difference is I can't hang the first bag of blood or push narcs. I find the only drawback is that the RN's purposely give the LPN's the harder, more time consuming patients. I get through this by concluding it is because of my skill, and am complimented by their laxidazial approach. Enlightened?????????
    Jo
  9. by   maikranz
    Originally posted by jo1998:
    Here in NJ the pay difference isn't that much. After reading posts about salaries, I can happily say that I make more than RN's that posted. Our units are mostly staffed with 1 RN and 3 LPN's. LPN's are in demand in Phila., NJ, NY, what layoffs are you referring to? My practice allows me to practice the same as an RN, only difference is I can't hang the first bag of blood or push narcs. I find the only drawback is that the RN's purposely give the LPN's the harder, more time consuming patients. I get through this by concluding it is because of my skill, and am complimented by their laxidazial approach. Enlightened?????????
    Jo
    Well, aren't YOU special.
  10. by   maikranz
    Y'all, doesn't anyone want to know where you can make $4600 (or was it $4800)
    as an LPN? An earlier poster said she made that much monthly!
    That's what---$55,000-57,600/year. It's enough to make me reactivate my LPN license.
  11. by   duckie
    To Mommy2: First off, I am pleased you are going to go on and become a nurse. In spite of the many complaints you read from all of us nurses during our times of frustration, I could not ever think of anything I would rather do. Since you live in Canada, I would not even venture to guess what the description of an LPN would be there so I recommend you check with your local nursing board and ask them. I started my career in a hospital setting but found it wasn't for me. I deeply admire all the nurses that do work in hospitals but I found my calling to be with the elderly. I am a charge nurse in a Long Term Health Care facility for the elderly and I love it. I do everything that RN's do within our facility but I believe this might be different in a hospital setting with some limitations. What you can and cannot do is dictated by the state you live in and the best advice I can give you is to research your job description before you make your choice. On any given day, I make out staff assisgnments, give meds and do treatments,supervise the staff to see they are doing their job correctly, do mounds and mounds of paper work, wipe dirty bottoms, feed residents, and handle emergency situations such as falls and codes, the list goes on and on but I think one of the most important jobs I do is I hold the hand of many that are taking their final breath. I honestly feel the best when I am holding the hand of someone who is dying. You see, that way they know that someone loves them and there is much peace in not being alone. As a nurse, I feel responsible not only for the physical and mental well being of my residents but also their spiritual well being. When I am with someone that is dying, I make it my priority to help them go from this life to the next with no worries or fear. Becoming a nurse doesn't offer great financial gains but with me, it is the joy I feel when my residents look up at me and say "I love you" that keeps me going back day after day, and trying to do 10 hours work in an 8 hour day. If you have the heart of a nurse, then go for it and I know you will be wonderful. There are a lot of great nurses that post on this board and they give it good advice. I have also seem much compassion given to those in doubt so you can always look to everyone for moral support. Many prayers for you as you make your decision.
  12. by   madcat
    I see you have been bombarded with responses, but I have to add my 2 cents: I am an RN, and I teach LPNs. In this part of the country, any nurse, RN or LPN, who is willing to work can get a job. They can get their entire education (I mean including books and uniforms) for only $3000, and begin working in only 15 mos. I see you have not been a nurse very long. One day an LPN will save your rear, and you will love them too. It's also a great way to begin your nursing career if you're not sure about it.
    Originally posted by Susy K:
    I often wondered why some people choose to become an LPN verses an RN, or why go for a 2 year program and just not go for 2 more years to get your BS? Especially with the threatened LPN layoffs, the lower pay, the limited employment choices. Is it money? Is it wanting to get your ability to work sooner? Please enlighten me. Thanks.[/QUOTE]



    [This message has been edited by madcat (edited April 06, 2001).]
  13. by   theboss
    THANKYOU MADCAT! i am an lpn and have been for 6 1/2 years now. when i first came to this website , the first thing i looked at was this post and i got furious. i work in the er and do everything the rns do. only because i have been taught by some awesome rns. i have 2 partners i work with and they have been wonderful to me and never once have i been made to feel beneath them..but reading this post made me realize that all rns are not that way , and that the ones i work with are great and i am proud to work with them.i have alot of respect for lpn friendly rns.. i plan to return to school next year for my rn and i wont forget where i came from. thanks again

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