why do you think ppl go to other countries for kidney transplant?

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    why do you think people go outside the USA for organ transplant?when the doctor already told them that they do no qualify for that transplant. and if they do it their body may reject it.what are the some reason they ll still go to other countries to have it done????
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  3. 7 Comments so far...

  4. 1
    Quote from k.dilraj
    why do you think people go outside the USA for organ transplant?when the doctor already told them that they do no qualify for that transplant. and if they do it their body may reject it.what are the some reason they ll still go to other countries to have it done????
    In the US you may not pay someone else for their Kidney. This is not the case in other countries. Unless someone is highly sensitized (which is extremely uncommon for someone needing their first kidney) eventually they will come up for a kidney. The wait time for a kidney is around three years depending on where you live. On the other hand if you travel to any number of foreign countries you can purchase a kidney from someone that is compatible and have it transplanted. Some of these hospitals will even properly screen their donors for infectious diseases. Some of them.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
    hypocaffeinemia likes this.
  5. 0
    Quote from k.dilraj
    why do you think people go outside the USA for organ transplant?when the doctor already told them that they do no qualify for that transplant. and if they do it their body may reject it.what are the some reason they ll still go to other countries to have it done????
    Because they can have it done. What would you do to obtain an organ for your self or a close family member? I am not saying it is right; however, what would you do if push came to shove?
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    Because the demand for organs exceeds the supply, many Western countries have criteria to determine who is eligible for organs. These take into account not only the suitability of the individual's health (eg are they well enough to survive transplantation) but also other factors that are used to compare them with other potential recipients (eg are they likely to follow the post-op protocols of taking anti-rejection medications; how long are they likely to survive, and in what condition; what other co-morbidities they have that might shorten their life expectancy despite receiving a transplant). In the US consideration is also given to insurance status for some (or all? US members) organs.

    In countries where organs are allocated more on a financial basis than an altruistic one (eg donors are paid), many of these factors are given lighter weight or dismissed altogether.

    For this reason someone who may be rejected in a Western country may be acceptable in a non-Western country, provided they have the financial resources. There are significant ethical issues (eg the source of the organs, the disposition of the money, how voluntary the organ donation is), as well as considerations about the quality of the health care delivery (from surgical skill and post-op care to cleanliness and medications).

    For some people who can afford it, the ethical aspect and the medical risks are less important than the potential for a dialysis-free life.
    k.dilraj likes this.
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    thank you very much
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    Personally,

    I don't find any "ethical conflict" with the sale of organs (so long as it is not coerced).

    My body. My organs. My choice.



    cheers,
  9. 0
    I don't have a problem with it at all.
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    You can't legally buy body parts anywhere. However, where starvation and desperation are rampant one can buy anything.
    Fiona59 and Ginger's Mom like this.


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