Why do hiring managers say they will call and don't???

  1. 0
    I know there are those of you out there that are hiring managers..I realize you get busy and have staffing issues plus a ton of others..but, I've been on 2 interviews in the last 2 weeks where I've been told I would "definitely" hear something "one way or the other within a week to 10 days" - I didn't hear from either so I did contact them. One has yet to reply back, the other told me she was checking references on those she was interested in - mine included - and would make a decision by the end of the week. It's now been another week past that time and I've heard nothing. I don't want to pester her but I would like to know something before I go applying for/interviewing for the 2nd job I want.
  2. 20 Comments so far...

  3. 2
    Go apply for the 2nd job. If you hear something before anything is final with that one (from the first one), then decide if you want to risk losing that AND the first one. Chances are, like you said, stuff came up. It's still not professional- but yeah, it happens. WHen I was going through applications for CNAs (for a class to get certified), I didn't mind if someone called me weekly to see what was going on (it generally didn't take long to get things done to start the class- minimum number of students, etc).

    If you're polite, and remind her you're still interested, it keeps you in her head. If she starts sounding annoyed, ask her when she thinks you can plan on an answer one way or another- you want to work there, but also need to just be working

    Hang in there
    DizzyLizzyNurse and scoochy like this.
  4. 1
    I agree that it is impolite and also unnecessary. Its just as easy to say, "If you haven't heard anything in a week or two, feel free to apply to other positions or another position on our website."

    However, I think many of us have been burned in much the same way you have so its my tendency to continue applying to positions regardless of whatever positive affirmations I get from an employment manager.
    pinkchris2000 likes this.
  5. 0
    Cliche?
  6. 3
    I wouldn't waste my time while waiting on an answer that may never come. Perhaps three days, then continue with the job search. They only said that because it wouldn't be smart to say, "Don't call us, we won't call you, unless we really want you".
  7. 0
    Women have not be trained to pass on bad news. Yes, it is part of what they are supposed to do within the scope of their position at times, but they have such a hard time doing that they keep putting it off. This is not an excuse, but when people are moved into management positions, some companies actually have decent training classes that teach you how to hire, interview, terminate, evaluate. Some let you sink or swim.

    Keep calling - and pin her down to a date.

    Best wishes.
  8. 3
    I was taught that after an interview I should fill out a thank you card addressed to the interviewers, and pop it in the mail either as I was leaving the facility, or 3 days later. Then give them a week. It doesn't matter what THEY say. What matters is that you have a game plan for landing a job.
    Don't ever fall in love with a job at the first interview. And ALWAYS have at least 2 other jobs on the line. Try to set up all your interviews in the same week so that you can feel polished and prepared. Have those thank-you cards in your satchel for each one.
    Never divulge to them how much you want any particular job, but DEFINITELY let them know that you are considering other employers and make sure to tell them that you are only interested in seeing which employer is the best fit.
    Best Fit is everything, and subjective to whim (IMHO).
    The thing about the thank you card is to keep you fresh in their minds. Seriously. This works for me every time. They ARE busy and meet lots of job hunters, most of them qualified. Who will stand out. How can you stand out? This is one way, amoung several. The key things to include are WHo you are, How they know you, When they met you, what position you were interested in...
    The Thank You cards should be sent separately to each interviewer, addressed to each one personally. If you can, send it to their home. If not, sending to them at work is fine. It should say something like "Dear XXXX, it was a pleasure to meet you. I enjoyed the interview on Monday June 1, and wanted to thank you for the opportunity to learn about working for XYZ Company ED. I hope to hear from you soon to follow up. Have a great week! Sincerely, ME, RN (Make sure your signature is legible)

    1 week after you sent the card (I send my card as I leave the building so I can remember what day I sent it) if you haven't heard back from them yet, give them a call with additional references you thought they might like to have, and ask them if they have any additional questions. Ask them again what skills/traits/qualities they are looking for- and if you didn't answer the way you wished you would have at the interview, you have the chance now to say "I have considered what you said/Spoken with my mentor/spouse, or etc, and I want to let you know that I would be Happy to work nights/Float to TCU (whatever it was)."

    Stay professional, and remember that the interview process is as much about selection for them as it is for you.
    Meanwhile, go to your other interviews, and do the same thing. When asked where else you are applying, tell them if you are comfortable with it and see what they say. you might learn a lot about the other companies! COme right out and ask them how they compare.
    Again,you are both looking for the right Fit.

    Before you leave the interview, ask them for their business card (If you don't have one), and when the best time to reach them is. Write this on the business card. Ask them when they expect to be making a decision/when do they need the position filled by. Ask them also if they have a 2nd interview for likely candidates, and when might they be holding those.

    During the first phone call with additional references, changes to your input, additional questions, etc... it's OK to ask them how they feel your interview went. If they said they had some concerns, tell them you understand. Ask what you can do to reassure them (If you feel their concerns are due to the fact that the interview didn't go well, or some extenuating factor).

    ... in any case, the main thing is to put yourself out there. Be the professional they want to hire and can count on, someone with follow-through. Keep yourself fresh in their minds.
    When the date they expected to have hired someone has come and gone and you didn't hear back from them, for your own professional development and in case that person doesn't work out-- call them again.
    Ask them what are the qualifications/traits/skills of the person they hired. Ask them what nudged them in that direction, and what you could have done differently. Thank them again, and leave the conversation giving them the idea that if another position should open up, that you would like to be kept in mind.

    Hope this helps.
    Woops
    RNgirlyAK, WindRN, and mo2rn like this.
  9. 5
    I've been offered the job after my interview, went home and waited for the call from HR... and waited... finally days later I called back and got the preemptive middleman, who said they decided to go with someone else. Thanks, I guess, for wasting my time.

    Long story short, and to be unfortunately blunt: it's an employer's market right now. They have a lot of applicants and use the same words on most of them. They forget you, or they're thinking of you then after 4 more interviews they may hire someone and forget to send out rejection letters or call you. Actually they'll never call unless they want you. Letters are better for rejections.

    And references? Seriously? I never check those, and I rarely read your letters of recommendation. Why should I call someone you know who will tell me what a nice person you are? I doubt they're "checking references," they're more likely keeping you on the hook while they interview more people. As soon as they start interviewing, all of a sudden coworkers come out of the woodwork- "You need a nurse? Hey my husband's sister/cousin/twin is looking for a job and he's experienced/a new grad/a friend of Doctor Palooka.

    Sometimes too, I like you, but I have other interviews set up. Then someone else just like you comes in and I have to basically flip a coin. Then I get busy and forget to tell you that I liked you and I'm not going to hire you.

    Don't wait for the call. If they want you, they'll let you know before you grow a long white beard. Keep looking, you're wasting time. And they're wasting your time too.
    VivaRN, WindRN, Marshall1, and 2 others like this.
  10. 0
    We always checked references and former employment data. We also required 3 letters of recommendation and we followed up with those individuals via telephone. We occasionally caught a few false letters that way, lol. We interviewed candidates first so as not to waste time with all the background checking just to meet the candidate and decide we didn't like him/her for any reason.

    Anyway, I agree with the opinion to keep looking. You have nothing to lose.
  11. 0
    SOmething others are leaving out that can be an issue is a hiring manager can say one thing but their hands are ultimately tied by said facilities HR departments policies and procedures. So there in lies the rub, for example a manager can want to hire you and request an offer be made, but then HR takes their ole sweet time doing so. The might say they will call you but they cant, HR has to do it, HR wont do it until the talk to all your references. HR wont do it until the have interviewed X number of people, regardless of who they want to hire. It can be endless.

    Then again my current facility called, offered me a position before I got home from the interview.


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