where are the nursing shortages? - page 9

I am hearing that there are shortages in some areas while some are cutting back jobs. Can anyone tell me for sure where thet know there are nursing shortages in the U.S or Canada. Thanks... Read More

  1. by   gwlillith
    Here in SW Florida there is currently a "hiring freeze" isn't that short for, you're SOL if you want to transfer internally?
  2. by   PFDGB
    Quote from lizz
    Although few seem to want to pay attention to the actual statistics, which do show a shortage, here they are:

    http://content.healthaffairs.org/cgi...aff.w4.526/DC1

    http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce...ect/report.htm


    So yes, there IS a shortage. There may not be a shortage in every area of the country but there is a shortage in many places.

    However, some don't want to acknowledge the data because it doesn't fit with their "no shortage" agenda.


    :angryfire I went to the above sites just for the fun of it. YES the stats indicate a shortage of nurses but you are missing the point.....There are thousands of USA nurses ready willing and able to work if it were not for the unsafe environment in our hospitals. Nurse/patient ratios put both at high risk. The "shortage" is not from a lack in the number of trained nurses ! It is due to the working conditions. If you read the article from above you would see that a lot of the older nurses have begun to return. This is because great strides have already been made in certain areas of the country curbing the high nurse/patient ratios. Contact your state nursing association and the ANA to get all of the facts....not just the ones posted by the government.....Check out the bill in the senate on the efforts of some to eliminate mandating nationwide.....Once these changes are made law; watch how many nurses will want to work and won't be able to get jobs because they'll already have been taken by foreign nurses.... :angryfire
  3. by   safetybud1
    Columbia, Missouri

    Quote from jenago
    I am hearing that there are shortages in some areas while some are cutting back jobs.

    Can anyone tell me for sure where thet know there are nursing shortages in the U.S or Canada.

    Thanks
  4. by   PFDGB
    Quote from elizzy
    This happened to me about 10 years ago, I was a new grad working on a medsurg floor for only about 6 months. I was overwhelmed and disappointed in this work and wanted to work ICU. I talked with the Nurse Manager and she did not want to hire me because of my minimal nursing experience. She said it cost alot of money to train for adult ICU...So she told me to work in a medsurg floor for at least a year before she would even consider me.
    2 weeks later, she called and said they were desperate and would consider hiring me. I was on "orientation" for 3 months, and it took a full year before I realized what in the heck I was doing.
    What it boils down to, they want experienced critical care nurses first. I don't get it..but I guess it comes down to the expense of training a nurse in critical care as opposed to hiring a nurse with experience! Go figure. I demand a high salary now with my experience, and have had multiple job offers in the past, but our salaries are still too low for my taste!
    Just my thoughts...
    Good luck in ICU...it's the best experience I've ever had and wouldn't change it for the world...:hatparty:

    Everyone tells me I have to do 1-2 yrs. med-surge before I can even consider trying something like ICU. But I've been a new grad since May 04 and I simply won't kill myself in med-surge here in NY. They're always short staffed 10-14 pt's per nurse and the cna's don't exactly like new nurses and they let you know that (so do the RN's) eat their own so to speak but complain they're short staffed go figure ??? My license is so on the line doing that... it scares me to death. So I decided to stay on vacation since May and plan to start looking around April this year. I might just try doing it the way you did and see where it lands.....sounds like a good idea... :spin:
  5. by   BETSRN
    Quote from elizzy
    Here in SW Florida there is currently a "hiring freeze" isn't that short for, you're SOL if you want to transfer internally?
    Hopefully, they will start paying more in Florida. What is the hourly wage for an experienced RN in Florida (in your area) at this time? I still would love to move down in a few years but the poor pay scale is what is really holding me back.
  6. by   piper_for_hire
    Man - here in the Philadelphia area you will have no problem finding an ICU job as a new grad. I couldn't imagine doing med/surg. I would leave nursing before I would do that. Just too hard and dangerous for my liking.

    -S
  7. by   mattsmom81
    Quote from lizz
    Can someone explain this to me? I've seen this posted many times. Basically you're claiming they're running ads, spending all this money recruiting NOT to hire people ???

    This makes no sense whatsoever. They could simply not run the ads, etc. and save the money

    Unless you're going to claim that hospitals run ads, etc. just to placate existing staff and mislead them about shortages ... which, quite frankly, seems really ludricrous and highly unlikely.


    Sorry to disillusion you on the healthcare industry's ways..I'm sure you think they're all honest.

    While I'm sure not all locales practice in exactly the same way, I gotta wonder why experienced nurses would EVER be ignored, IF THE NEED IS REALLY THERE.

    What do they REALLY want?

    I'm convinced their tactics provide a constant search for 'perfect specimens' along with a blackball of those deemed imperfect. But I doubt I will convince you. Hard to convince young nurses this goes on...til it happens to a friend or them.

    The healthcare industry benefits from the continued churning out of new grads /importation so they can continue to discard the currently working nurses when they wish, and I've seen THIS happen over and over. Nurses are throwaways.
    More in some areas than others, granted. The local hospital association I am familiar with operates like a mini mafia.

    PS all that advertising/recruiting is a tax writeoff....
    Last edit by mattsmom81 on Feb 25, '05
  8. by   fergus51
    I think it REALLY depends on where you are. I worked at one hospital as a new grad and it was horrible. I wouldn't be surprised to hear that they used such dirty tricks. Fortunately there are places out there that aren't sneaky or underhanded too.

    It may be just me, but I've noticed that one hospital towns are the most vulnerable to this type of thing. Since they have no competition, they can be pretty selective about who they hire and don't hire.
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Sorry to disillusion you on the healthcare industry's ways..I'm sure you think they're all honest.

    While I'm sure not all locales practice in exactly the same way, I gotta wonder why experienced nurses would EVER be ignored, IF THE NEED IS REALLY THERE.

    What do they REALLY want?

    I'm convinced their tactics provide a constant search for 'perfect specimens' along with a blackball of those deemed imperfect. But I doubt I will convince you. Hard to convince young nurses this goes on...til it happens to a friend or them.

    The healthcare industry benefits from the continued churning out of new grads /importation so they can continue to discard the currently working nurses when they wish, and I've seen THIS happen over and over. Nurses are throwaways.
    More in some areas than others, granted. The local hospital association I am familiar with operates like a mini mafia.

    PS all that advertising/recruiting is a tax writeoff....
    I think you are really on it, mattsmom. I think if they had their way, UAPs, CMA's and cheap labor would be the thing to fill the bill, NOT experienced, proven RN's or LPNs. Experienced RN's cost way too much. They are seen as a liability more than an asset in so many hospitals and LTC's today.
  10. by   sleepless in norman
    WHAT EVER THEY SAY, WHAT EVER THEY PROMISE YOU, STAY OUT OF OKLAHOMA, READ THE OBN'S ACTIONS AGAINST NURSES AND THE CASES THEY PROSECUTE, PROTECT YOUR LICENSE AND CAREERS. 'S WITH WOLVES.
  11. by   OkieBoo
    Here in Oklahoma LPN's perform many of the same functions as the RN's do. I think by government and employers giving preference to RN's they have created their own "shortages". There's many a "RN" (new and seasoned) that this LPN has oriented and trained, including those to be my up and coming charge....It is also very competitive to try to get into ASN/BSN programs here because school budgets do not allow for adequate classess/staff. I am currently in a "fast track" program that will still take me 2-3yrs (just to get my ASN) because I am not receiving credit for my LPN and year of experience until I apply to the actual nursing school. Before I can do that I have to complete unecessary prerequisites.
  12. by   Sheri257
    Quote from mattsmom81
    Sorry to disillusion you on the healthcare industry's ways..I'm sure you think they're all honest.

    The healthcare industry benefits from the continued churning out of new grads /importation so they can continue to discard the currently working nurses when they wish, and I've seen THIS happen over and over. Nurses are throwaways.
    More in some areas than others, granted. The local hospital association I am familiar with operates like a mini mafia.

    PS all that advertising/recruiting is a tax writeoff....
    I don't believe the healthcare industry is honest by any means. I believe they're interested in the bottom line and only the bottom line. And, if the whole game is to bring in new nurses and discard the old ones ... the question is how do they profit from this?

    If they profit by paying the new nurses less money, then ok. But then you'd have to also add the costs of all the advertising, recruiting etc. which, for all we know, could make this proposition just as expensive as keeping the old nurses. Especially when you figure additional training, orientation and other costs that you have with new grads.

    The motivation can't just be tax writeoffs because all expenses are tax writeoffs. So the question is: do they make more money with this alleged charade that you have described? And, if so, how?

    If, in fact, this is more profitable then, I would tend to agree with you. I'm just not sure that it is, in fact, more profitable when you consider the other costs. Every study I've read points out that high nursing staff turnover actually increases costs so, that's why it doesn't make much sense to me.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on Feb 25, '05
  13. by   KacyLynnRN
    Indianapolis has a lot of nursing jobs available...the are tons of hospitals here...if you are willing to work night shifts and some weekends, you will have no trouble finding a job. However, if you want day shift with minimal weekends you will have a bit more trouble. There does seem to be quite a few nursing jobs here, though.

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