What's special about male nurses? - page 5

Hi everyone, I'm pre-nursing, and everyone keeps talking to me about how male nurses are in demand and what an asset it's going to be for me. I get that men rarely enter the profession, but I don't... Read More

  1. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from OzzyRN
    Heyho
    The benifit of being a male nurse is being able to be sperated from the ******** that goes on between female nurses. I am constantly gob smacked how awful female staff behave towards each other. I am even more gobbsmacked at how awful new grads are treated and ******* about. I am sure that there are heaps of male nurses that are bastards but Im yet to work with any that work hard to put others down.
    I have worked with two trecherous male nurses who did things like sabeotage their co-workers, spread gossip and lies, set co-workers up to fail, etc. However, these guys were the exception.
    Most nurses are pretty good people in my book, male or female.
  2. by   rodge
    because we rock!!
  3. by   goats'r'us
    male nurses are like unicorns. they're rare and have an extra appendage, but at the end of the day they're just horses!
  4. by   banditrn
    Quote from Farkinott
    I think male nurses are different because we tend to talk in plain language! I can recall an incident where one of my female colleagues was asking a confused old man if he "wanted to go for a wee?" After watching her vain attempt for about 5 mins I went and asked "hey mate, do you want to go for a pi**?" Instant success! A greater ratio of males does keep the ********** on a lower level as well.
    Go for a wee?!!:chuckle :chuckle

    I agree with some of what you say - I've always gotten on better, on the whole, with guys. Or gals who work nites!
  5. by   puggymae
    The male nurses I have worked with look at things differently than the female nurses do - and they don't tend to bottle up how they feel about a situation (good or bad). I find that to be a good thing.
  6. by   marilynmom
    I don't find much difference in the male nurses I work with or am in school with honestly.
  7. by   Works2xs
    Change the question. Imagine for a moment that nursing was a male-dominant profession. What benefit would there be in bringing in more females? Broader insight to the people being served? Different priorities? Different approaches to interpersonal relations? Etc. Etc.... The same benefits apply regardless of whether the equation adds more men, women, or any other type of cultural context. So, bringing in more men to the profession will broaden the diversity of the how the service is provided.

    Nursing is also having issues with filling positions, be it as instructors, bedside, or whatever. Certainly, making an effort to tap into nearly half of a population not currently involved in nursing would help meet those particular needs.

    So it's not that there's some magic bullet in adding more men to the profession. It's more that it provides greater opportunity to tap into the entire spectrum of the human potential needed to get the best and brightest to the bedside.
  8. by   DeLana_RN
    Some of the best and some of the worst nurses I have worked with have been men. Some work hard, are helpful, have a great attitude; others gossip, some will stab you in the back... just like anyone anywhere.

    I do like to see more men enter the profession (as women have entered medicine) for various reasons; but they shouldn't expect "special" treatment

    DeLana

    P.S. My husband went to nursing school after I did (it would have never occurred to him otherwise, but he loves it. He works in a cardiac ICU). His father - now 84 - had a little trouble accepting it at first, he kept asking "So you want to become a paramedic?" The older generation still has a few stereotypes :chuckle
  9. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from Works2xs
    Change the question. Imagine for a moment that nursing was a male-dominant profession. What benefit would there be in bringing in more females? Broader insight to the people being served? Different priorities? Different approaches to interpersonal relations? Etc. Etc.... The same benefits apply regardless of whether the equation adds more men, women, or any other type of cultural context. So, bringing in more men to the profession will broaden the diversity of the how the service is provided.

    Nursing is also having issues with filling positions, be it as instructors, bedside, or whatever. Certainly, making an effort to tap into nearly half of a population not currently involved in nursing would help meet those particular needs.

    So it's not that there's some magic bullet in adding more men to the profession. It's more that it provides greater opportunity to tap into the entire spectrum of the human potential needed to get the best and brightest to the bedside.
  10. by   Overland1
    When I was in Nursing school, ten percent of my class (of sixty) was male... they are still male, as far as I know . Some of the nurses where we did clinical rotation said that they look forward to having guys work as nurses there because (they) " would not have to do as much heavy lifting", (i.e., the guys could do that stuff). We all laughed it off, knowing that these nurses proved by their statements that they were looking for an easy way out of some work.

    During school, I did a paper on Men in Nursing, and found that the earliest nurses were monks (male monks, at that ) who rode around on horseback during the Crusades, providing care to the sick and injured. Later, in this country, the number of guys working as nurses declined because of the wars - they served as soldiers and the women dominated the profession just by the sheer numbers and needs. By the way, my mother (86 years old), when asked what her son does for a living, still uses the term, "male nurse".

    After graduation, all 10% of us gravitated toward critical care assignments and I still enjoy critical care to this day. What I have noticed in some cases is that when male and female nurses work together, they are generally more polite, at least until one person's sick sense of humor starts to show, then we all have a good time with it, usually when appropriate. I admittedly have to be careful with my sick sense of humor while at work.

    While there is really never anything "special" about any person solely based upon that person being male or female, there is definitely something special about any person who works and studies hard to become and remain a top-shelf nurse.
  11. by   DBlack1
    I don't believe that males entering the profession will tolerate the poor pay as well as the females, and is a reason many males leave the field.

    I graduated with 5 other males, and a year later two of us are out of nursing.
  12. by   steve0123
    What's special about male nurses?

    I don't know, but one thing that makes me so ANGRY is being called a "male nurse", as though it's an entirely different job description.

    I do everything the girls do, and I happen to think I do it pretty damned well!

    My brothers know this term is my achilles heel, and take great delight introducing me to people as their brother, "the male nurse"...
  13. by   Cmariehart
    [MOUSE][/MOUSE]

    Murses rock! And so do our male aides... Some nights if it weren't for them I swear I would go crazy... They're not as uptight and cranky as most females and they always have food!!!! Plus they're great at giving a lift or boost and very handy when a pt turns abusive and what not, and they tell you how it is, not what you want to hear. And lets face it they understand male pts alot more than us females do... It's just a guy thing..... Thank god we have them... Some days they're just more fun and easier to work with than the females......

    [BANANA][/BANANA] we have a resident that threw a banana at 2 of our murses. a couple days later at arts and crafts this ladies roommate made our murses banana people in honor of that night! True story!!!!!! :smilecoffeecup:

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