What To Do After You've Made A Mistake What To Do After You've Made A Mistake - pg.4 | allnurses

What To Do After You've Made A Mistake - page 4

Nursing school doesn't really teach you how to be a nurse, it just gives you a glimpse into the world of nursing and the nclex gives you a license to learn. If you're smart, you'll learn something... Read More

  1. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    2
    Quote from amygarside
    right! but if you get fired on the spot after admitting your mistake, then either ways you won't earn that trust.
    Someone smart enough to recognize a mistake and honorable enough to admit it is someone I'd trust more that someone who was either too stupid to realize they'd made one or more committed to covering it up than to mitigating the harm to the patient. We ALL make mistakes.
    OCNRN63 and bbnursedfw08 like this.
  2. Visit  newbienurse127 profile page
    0
    One day I had 4 busy patients and accidentally charted a pt's bowel movement in another patient's chart. I put the entry into the correct pt's chart but forgot to remove the incorrect entry from the other pt's chart. I didn't realize it until a week later when I was recycling my notes from that day, and I thought "I never deleted that entry!" Now I am worried that the if the pt became constipated or something it would take longer for anyone to intervene because her chart says she just had a BM. I even have nightmares about her getting a bowel obstruction and perforated intestine! I know this is illogical because her bowel sounds and abdomen are evaluated each shift, but could this happen???
  3. Visit  kaenee profile page
    1
    I committed and error during my graveyard shift and that was the reason why I ended up here to know if someone committed the same mistake like I did but alas, I found none.

    Anyways, my mistake was totally idiotic in nature.

    My patient was on NPO but I gave her 30cc of water and her medicine but it wasn't just an ordinary medicine, it was an oral hypoglycemic agent Glimepiride and she was scheduled for a Fasting Blood Glucose at 6:00 AM. I gave her the medicine at 5:00 AM.

    I was so stupid that I even reminded her not to take anything before her blood is withdrawn but I ended up eating those words. When she was done taking her medicine, she then asked me about her NPO status and then it dawned on me. I was like splashed with cold water all over my body. I don't know how to react in front of her. I even forgot how I responded to her question. All I remember was I went directly to my preceptor and she was horrified but she wasn't mad when I told her about it. We then went to our team leader. She was calm and she wasn't saying anything. She then told my preceptor to call the lab right away to get her blood. My guilt doubled when they told the lab that the reason why they would draw the blood early is because the patient couldn't wait anymore and that she was hungry. They were forced to tell a lie on my behalf and I couldn't help myself to feel worse about it. I think it was around 30 to 45 minutes after the medicine administration that her blood was drawn out.

    I just hoped that there would be no significant difference but I doubt that would happen. T_T
    Ruby Vee likes this.
  4. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    0
    Quote from kaenee
    I committed and error during my graveyard shift and that was the reason why I ended up here to know if someone committed the same mistake like I did but alas, I found none.

    Anyways, my mistake was totally idiotic in nature.

    My patient was on NPO but I gave her 30cc of water and her medicine but it wasn't just an ordinary medicine, it was an oral hypoglycemic agent Glimepiride and she was scheduled for a Fasting Blood Glucose at 6:00 AM. I gave her the medicine at 5:00 AM.

    I was so stupid that I even reminded her not to take anything before her blood is withdrawn but I ended up eating those words. When she was done taking her medicine, she then asked me about her NPO status and then it dawned on me. I was like splashed with cold water all over my body. I don't know how to react in front of her. I even forgot how I responded to her question. All I remember was I went directly to my preceptor and she was horrified but she wasn't mad when I told her about it. We then went to our team leader. She was calm and she wasn't saying anything. She then told my preceptor to call the lab right away to get her blood. My guilt doubled when they told the lab that the reason why they would draw the blood early is because the patient couldn't wait anymore and that she was hungry. They were forced to tell a lie on my behalf and I couldn't help myself to feel worse about it. I think it was around 30 to 45 minutes after the medicine administration that her blood was drawn out.

    I just hoped that there would be no significant difference but I doubt that would happen. T_T
    Nah, you're not the only one. I've done something very similar -- ended up giving D50 boluses. You did the right thing in going to your preceptor immediately to set about rectifying the situation!
  5. Visit  WorriedNurse25 profile page
    0
    I raised my voice as i was going down a hallway at my ltc facility and i wasnt having the best of days. got terminated from my job and my whole reputation might be tarnished now...no one has been able to tell me im going to be okay and im not even sure ill want to do nursing again if this all pans out.
    Biggest mistake of my life honestly...
  6. Visit  Deepinthegame profile page
    0
    Ok, all this owning up sounds so good , so Florence Nightingale ( would have been laid off or fired along time ago ) -but I have seen nurses for simple mistakes hung out to dry. Yeah, yeah, yeah - pt's advocate and all that -please. Most hospitals don't own up -working you understaffed , bad equipment , adding more to your workload , etc. , ( dare you to complain -go ahead I'll wait ) and all the while holding your pee for the last seven hours you accidentally give ______ . No one is the wiser and pt still looks fine. NO WAY AM I SAYING ANYTHING ! By all means , you can be that standup person and your name running wild through the high speed grapevine. Plus, not to mention written up , or let go. Naw, I'll pass .

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