What makes you nervous about or irritated with a new grad or orientee? - page 5

I've noticed alot of threads lately from new nurses who seemed quite stressed out, which I can totally understand, I've been there for sure. So I thought I'd start a thread from the other POV. This... Read More

  1. by   sissyboo
    I'm "only" a CNA. I've only held one job as a CNA in a Peds Unit. I kind of got the feeling that asking questions around the place was wrong. It's a small hospital and the unit wasn't extremely busy at the time. They almost looked annoyed when I asked a question and kind of complained that I was too slow. Yet I never had a patient/parents complain about my work! I actually had several compliments.

    I did alot of my clinicals in the OB unit of the same hospital with several of the same nurses. I did really well there and didn't ask a whole lot of questions, because they explained things really well to the students. When I took a job a few months later in a different unit, but with many the same nurses (the two units kind of work as one, many of the nurses float back and forth), they expected me come in an know it all.

    I kind of feel this is wrong! I think anyone providing care who has a problem with procedure should ask questions and many of them, if necessary!
  2. by   sissyboo
    Wow. I've kind of had this fear of orientation and precepting. Everyones comments are great. I'm glad I've seen a few opinions from both sides!
  3. by   Sheri257
    Quote from HeatherLPN
    What irritates me is the ones that are "too good" for "aide" work. If you are inserting a suppository and their brief is wet, change them, don't make them wait while you get an aide to do it. STNA's work hard and you can help them out by changing ONE brief, so get over yourself. It aggravates me when nurses come in and treat the aides like they are second-class. Yes, you may have more education and responsibility, but those aides deserve as much respect as you do. They have their job, you have yours, but you need each other to be able to take the best care of your residents, the very people who are the reason you have a job in the first place.
    There's always two sides to every story. I used to believe this also, because I used to be an aide. But now I'm not so sure anymore because this can also be a trap. I was delegating a lot of work to the aides because I had a ton of RN work that had to be done. One of them accused me of being a primma donna and not helping. I felt really bad because I used to be an aide, so I started helping more.

    Well ... you go into the room and you think it's only going to be one diaper but, as it turns out, they've got non-stop diarrhea and it's an all day thing. The patient also needs water, a new gown, a linen change ... and the aide is nowhere to be found because you're helping. Before you know it, you're behind on your RN work and your preceptor is really ticked off.

    Now ... you've got to go find the aide and get them to do their job. They still think you're being a primma donna when, in fact, you've got a lot of catching up to do because you helped them in the first place. So, I learned the hard way that I've got to get my RN work done first, no matter what the aides think.

    :typing
  4. by   P_RN
    I really had to think on this one. I want my new orientee to put forth an effort to be on time, be clean and smell good. You'd be surprised at what I saw on some young people.

    I want them to question anything they don't understand. Heck I could go across the building and be just a confused by that unit as a new grad/emp is on my unit.

    I want them to pay attention. One girl I remember I believe had butterflies for breakfast. She would go into a room with a purpose and get distracted by any shiny thing in the room-tv, book, magazine, anything would stop her dead.

    I want you to TELL me if I am not being fair, too fast, too slow, not doing it the way they were taught.

    And if you decide this unit is not for you, please tell me why and not just quit coming to work.
  5. by   RNsRWe
    I have always asked questions, and lots of them. It has never worked against me, I always learned from them, and it let the person I was asking KNOW if I DIDN'T know something, or that I was obviously willing to be taught.

    That said, I now have a charge nurse that HATES when I ask ANYTHING. I mean, if I don't understand why something was done a certain way, and ask about whether I was doing it wrong or if that other way better (or not), I get an exasperated "you ask too many questions! Stop questioning everything!". Very frustrating, since I have learned to severely limit my questions with her to what I absolutely HAVE to know in order to either not screw up, or do the right thing by my patient, or not have administration skewer me over not completing paperwork correctly.

    If I don't ask the question, I risk the screw up (and a "why didn't you just ASK??"). If I DO ask, I get the rude and nasty comments about how I am too anal. I am not anal, I am conscientous. I am not claiming anyone has done anything wrong, I just need to know what *I* should do. And yet, she throws up her hands and (loudly) declares that I need to stop "being this way". Umm....the same way that everyone else I have worked with in the last few months has told me was a GOOD thing? That I have actually CAUGHT problems because of questioning things, and have learned along the way?

    Frankly, she's making my life hell when she's on. The other charge nurses don't give me anything remotely like this kind of grief. It's gotta be just a personality conflict between her and I (I also have a sense of humor that she sees as sarcastic--unpleasantly so, apparently) that can't be worked through, and we'll always be at odds (how nice). She keeps telling me she's trying to "change how I think, to stop asking so many questions". Well, last time I checked, the way I think has done me very well, so I don't think it's my thinking that needs to change.

    But what to DO about it?? Yeah, yeah: don't ask her a single question. Easy to say, but when you're new, there's only a couple of nurses on plus the charge, well, you GOTTA ask if it's important. And get ridiculed, I guess.
  6. by   Ohmygosh
    Quote from EmerNurse
    Hi Ohmygosh!
    I don't think folks were complaining about students who want to share the experiences amongst their clinical group. Rather, new nurses who don't want to do what they consider "dirty" work (placing a foley, dropping an NGT, even help with a code brown, whatever) after they've done it once or twice - they'd rather let someone else do it.

    When we're precepting a new nurse, we try to have her not only do things with "our" patients but also with others' patients when possible, so that he/she gets as MUCH hands-on as possible. I don't say "Susie RN needs a foley in her patient in room 5, would you like to do it?" because Susie is lazy or I want you to do the "Dirty" jobs you don't like. I want you to do it because you need to get to the point where these things are simply automatic. To have a preceptee tell me that he/she doesn't want to do it (while sitting at the station, "waiting" for whatever) because she's "already done two of them", is very annoying.
    I understand where you are coming from ....even as a student I too have observed this behavior while at clinical rotations.
    I have always tried to help out with whosoever needed help --LOL I think code browns have become my specialty! Anyway...as I said I try to help whenever possible --I'll do whatever anyone needs me to do as long as I feel relatively comfortable with the task. I figure it like this...if someone has a fire to put out and another fire or two smoldering--and I am sitting pretty---I might as well 1) get more experience and 2)give that someone else a break--I may be the one who needs help one day!--In my opinion if you can keep the unit as stress free for all involved--the better day the whole unit will have!
  7. by   HeatherLPN
    Quote from lizz
    There's always two sides to every story. I used to believe this also, because I used to be an aide. But now I'm not so sure anymore because this can also be a trap. I was delegating a lot of work to the aides because I had a ton of RN work that had to be done. One of them accused me of being a primma donna and not helping. I felt really bad because I used to be an aide, so I started helping more.

    Well ... you go into the room and you think it's only going to be one diaper but, as it turns out, they've got non-stop diarrhea and it's an all day thing. The patient also needs water, a new gown, a linen change ... and the aide is nowhere to be found because you're helping. Before you know it, you're behind on your RN work and your preceptor is really ticked off.

    Now ... you've got to go find the aide and get them to do their job. They still think you're being a primma donna when, in fact, you've got a lot of catching up to do because you helped them in the first place. So, I learned the hard way that I've got to get my RN work done first, no matter what the aides think.

    :typing
    I see your point there. Luckily, at my facility I have wonderful aides, so they understand that I have my own stuff to do and just appreciate any help they get. I guess alot of that depends on your aides?
  8. by   TracyB,RN
    MyBSN.... LOVE your avatar, the boxer pup. Gorgeous!!!
    Anyway, I don't mind precepting at all. I find it fun & it keeps me on my toes to be sure I continue to do things correctly, but my pet peeve is someone who isn't interested in anything. Working in surgery has it's own set of challenges & running out of the room at every possible moment to use the phone, fix make-up or whatever just totally irks the heck out of me.
  9. by   DaBears
    I'm graduating in May and this was really interesting for me to read. I am just the opposite of a know it all. The one thing I'm lacking, according to all my clinical teachers and preceptors, is confidence. I am scared to death(but super excited at the same time) to graduate because I feel as though I don't know enough to do this on my own. I'm glad all of you love answering questions, because I can guarantee I will be the annoying girl that asks 50 million questions for fear of doing something wrong. Nursing is not a job where you can really afford to guess and check and it suprises me that inexperienced new grads are so cocky. ALright, well if around September you're being hounded with questions by a young looking nurse, it will most likely be me
  10. by   newbiern2006
    Quote from lizz
    Man ... I wished my preceptor was like that. Instead, I was ridiculed for asking questions. I'd always get comments like: didn't they teach you anything in nursing school?

    I always do things the way the RN's want it to be done and don't argue. I figure I'll have plenty of time to do things my way when I'm on my own. But ... some of them just want to put you down no matter what.

    One time it was an hour before the shift change and I was pretty tired. She had the MAR and I needed to give some morphine. I'd been giving the same dose all day but, I wanted to make sure I was remembering it correctly since I was tired.

    Since she had the book ... I casually asked ... this is the dose ... right? Man ... she jumped on me: don't you remember the dose? I said: yeah ... but I'm kinda tired and just want to make sure.

    Her response was: You need to develop more stamina!

    Ok ... I was just trying to be safe but ... whatever.



    After reading many posts here, I have to say that I wasn't pleased with my preceptorship, and now I realize it was even worse than I thought. It was short, inadequate, unorganized (management's fault) and asking questions just brings criticism, rolling eyes, impatient sigh heaving, etc. I am fed up with the place I am working, and I'm outta here just as soon as I get my tuition reimbursement check.
  11. by   Lizzy6
    Allot of good answers, however one that I would like to add, which I recall while I was precepting a nurse to our floor (not a new nurse) is to limit your cell phone calls. Nothing worse when you are trying to orient another nurse when she consistently is making calls & receiving calls.
  12. by   buddiage
    Quote from mauxtav8r
    Thanks, to all of you "seasoned" nurses who are telling it like it is. The OP brings up a great thread here - let new nurses know how they are perceived by experienced nurses.

    Believe me, (I'm a student), those "know it alls" are just as annoying in clinicals as they are after they start work.

    Yes, I totally agree. I don't think they are that common from my own limited experience (never had any no it alls in my clinicals group last semester, and I felt we were all good to ask questions and to be as helpful as possible).

    We had one nurse last rotation that came across and stand offish and cranky, but we all had to "just deal." I found every other nurse to be helpful and pleasant, and even "the cranky one" was biddable if you were trying and prepared and gave her a little extra effort. I don't know how common "know it alls" are as students...Now that I think of it, I was assigned to a seasoned tech during a shift, and I wanted to learn of course, but also be useful. She asked me hesitantly if I wanted to empty the trash cans in her hall. I was like, "Yeah, sure, where do the bags go?" and she looked at me and said, "really? You will?" Now thinking back, maybe in her experience she's had people that "were too good" to do that. I might have been blessed with an extremely awesome group.


    I've been reading the allnurses.com for a while to know what NOT to do. I don't think I will have a problem.
  13. by   DeLana_RN
    ... and I appreciate your input.

    I'm not new to dialysis (having done it for 5+ years in an outpatient/chronic clinic), but I'm new to a hospital inpatient/acute unit. My preceptor is pretty supportive for the most part, but I don't appreciate it when she corrects me in front of a patient (about something trivial - not an emergency!). I hesitate to even bring this up in private since I don't need an enemy in this setting where everyone has worked for a very long time. So I just try to ignore it (she may not even be aware of it after all).

    I just wanted to let you preceptors know to be aware of how - and when - you correct your orientees. Embarrassing them in front of pts or other staff will not help them learn (especially when it's about something that can be correctly done in more than one way, and an orientee who does know something about the specialty )

    DeLana

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