What makes you nervous about or irritated with a new grad or orientee? - page 4

I've noticed alot of threads lately from new nurses who seemed quite stressed out, which I can totally understand, I've been there for sure. So I thought I'd start a thread from the other POV. This... Read More

  1. by   GardenDove
    I suspect that some who are uncomfortable with questions feel put on the spot, probably because they don't know the answer. If a new nurse or anyone else asks me something I don't know, I just say that I don't know the answer, let's look it up (on the internet, lol)

    I remember many times listening with the other nurses to a taped report, and the reporting nurse mentions some unusual procedure or condition. I'll be the one to pipe up "Anyone know what that is?". Turns out nobody knows, but they are keeping their mouths shut.
  2. by   RazorbackRN
    Quote from lizz
    Well ... I don't want to turn this into another nightmare preceptor thread ...

    But I really do salute the RN's who appreciate the fact that some of us new grads are trying to do the right thing.

    And thank you for encouraging us to ask questions because, there are some RN's who discourage us ... a lot.

    :typing

    You are very right about that. When I graduated, my first preceptor told my supervisor that I would never make it, I was too cautious.

    Anyhoo, my 90 day eval came and I was told by my supervisor about the "too cautious" stereotype. I was actually devestated because I didn't know that someone (especially a new nurse could be too cautious). However, she said that she didn't consider me to be too cautious but rather one of the "safest" nurses. That really made me feel better.

    I only had that preceptor a few weeks, thank goodness, because the week after I changed preceptors this nurse allowed her orientee to write a dialysis order and the orientee wrote it so that they were pulling off an extra liter of fluid per hour. Needless to say, that preceptor doesn't precept anymore. I ended up with a preceptor that was wonderful and to this day is still more than willing to answer my questions (because I still have plenty after 7 months).
  3. by   RazorbackRN
    Quote from Tweety
    Lizz sometimes I'm amazed you've made it so far.......your entire experience from day one has sounded dreadful. You should have said "yes, I do, but despite that I'm performing the five rights......isn't that what you do?".

    From day one when I precept I beg them to please ask me questions, no matter how silly, that it's never a bother, that I'm never too busy, that I am there for them, that this is their experience, not mine. it's not about me and if I get irritated, it's up to me to deal with it without degrading the GN or senior student.

    I've learned to deal with all kinds of personalities, the "know it alls", the fearful ones who are slow and ask too many questions, etc. but mostly people who have worked their tails off to become a nurse and just want to be the best that they can be. They do have some responsiblities, however, it is my job to adjust myself, my attitude and my teaching style to them and make sure that at the end of 12 weeks they are ready to hit the floor on their own safely.

    Tweety, I think you must be the most wonderful nurse ever created!
  4. by   Ohmygosh
    Quote from KellNY
    Yep, know-it-all new nurses bug me. When I try to show them something (ie: "They're going to extubate Mr. Smith-why don't you go assist?" or "Mrs. Jenkins is going to have a c/s and btl, why not scrub in and assist or observe?") I get back "No, I saw one last week." or "We did that in clinicals."

    WTH? Take each opportunity you can to learn. No one expects you to know everything. Nurses are never done learning. I can say with honesty that I've never seen two identical deliveries. Even now, I still learn something with almost every patient, be it better positioning for comfort...better technique for procedures...different emotional reactions...more words or phrases in Spanish...side effects to meds, etc.
    I am really not trying to pick a fight here or start an arguement....however, I must say that being a student...I have also responded with "I already saw that procedure" I didn't say that because I thought I knew everything about the procedure from seeing it once or twice.
    The reason I said that was because I knew that we (my clinical group) had a very limited number of times actually at clinical facilities -and I wanted another one of my classmates to have the opportunity to see the procedure as well.
    It has been my experience that only 2 or 3 students were allowed to view the "procedures" at one time---so it seems that the students who are a little more organized and where caught up (as best you can be) got to see all the "cool stuff". I tried to keep a mental list of who didnt get to see such and such or so and so...and if I had already seen it once or twice--I would try to give someone else that opportunity--even if it meant I had to cover there patients as well as my own. JMO
  5. by   Sheri257
    Quote from RazorbackRN
    Tweety, I think you must be the most wonderful nurse ever created!
    Yeah ... I think we should give him an award.

  6. by   jmgrn65
    Quote from GardenDove
    I've noticed alot of threads lately from new nurses who seemed quite stressed out, which I can totally understand, I've been there for sure. So I thought I'd start a thread from the other POV. This shouldn't be an opportunity to be sarcastic or uncharitable, but maybe it can help a new grad to see the other side of the story.

    I get nervous by a new nurse who doesn't ask questions. I also will have misgivings about a new nurse who asks a question and then argues with my answer. Also, a new nurse who knows it all makes me nervous.

    I get irritated by a cocky new nurse. A little bit of deference and humilty is a good thing. But someone who grovels makes me unsettled. I also get annoyed if a new nurse is too bossy with the pts.

    :yeahthat:
  7. by   RN007
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    I'm shocked that you got written up for wanting to learn. I love to precept students like you--if I don't know, I'll find out and we both learn something new.

    Part of my job is to teach you how to be an independent nurse by teaching you where to find the information that you need.

    Information is not static; it's dynamic. It's always changing and you have to ask lots of questions to keep up.

    Given the proper nurturing, you'll make an excellent nurse.
    Thanks, Angie O. It's people like you, GardenDove and Tweety on allnurses who keep me going!
  8. by   GardenDove
    Quote from RN007
    Thanks, Angie O. It's people like you, GardenDove and Tweety on allnurses who keep me going!
    Wow, I'm honored to be on your list!
  9. by   RN007
    Quote from GardenDove
    I suspect that some who are uncomfortable with questions feel put on the spot, probably because they don't know the answer. If a new nurse or anyone else asks me something I don't know, I just say that I don't know the answer, let's look it up (on the internet, lol)

    I remember many times listening with the other nurses to a taped report, and the reporting nurse mentions some unusual procedure or condition. I'll be the one to pipe up "Anyone know what that is?". Turns out nobody knows, but they are keeping their mouths shut.
    That's because you were right on with this comment. Thank you!
  10. by   EmerNurse
    Quote from Ohmygosh
    I am really not trying to pick a fight here or start an arguement....however, I must say that being a student...I have also responded with "I already saw that procedure" I didn't say that because I thought I knew everything about the procedure from seeing it once or twice.
    The reason I said that was because I knew that we (my clinical group) had a very limited number of times actually at clinical facilities -and I wanted another one of my classmates to have the opportunity to see the procedure as well.
    It has been my experience that only 2 or 3 students were allowed to view the "procedures" at one time---so it seems that the students who are a little more organized and where caught up (as best you can be) got to see all the "cool stuff". I tried to keep a mental list of who didnt get to see such and such or so and so...and if I had already seen it once or twice--I would try to give someone else that opportunity--even if it meant I had to cover there patients as well as my own. JMO
    Hi Ohmygosh!
    I don't think folks were complaining about students who want to share the experiences amongst their clinical group. Rather, new nurses who don't want to do what they consider "dirty" work (placing a foley, dropping an NGT, even help with a code brown, whatever) after they've done it once or twice - they'd rather let someone else do it.

    When we're precepting a new nurse, we try to have her not only do things with "our" patients but also with others' patients when possible, so that he/she gets as MUCH hands-on as possible. I don't say "Susie RN needs a foley in her patient in room 5, would you like to do it?" because Susie is lazy or I want you to do the "Dirty" jobs you don't like. I want you to do it because you need to get to the point where these things are simply automatic. To have a preceptee tell me that he/she doesn't want to do it (while sitting at the station, "waiting" for whatever) because she's "already done two of them", is very annoying.
  11. by   Sheri257
    I'd also like to say something to all of the preceptors out there, especially those who get irritated with us new grads.

    I don't know what it's like at other nursing programs but, by the time I graduated ... I'd been in at least a dozen hospitals and I'd worked with dozens of RN's. It's really difficult to adjust not to just being a new nurse ... but learning each hospital's system, each RN's system ... everything.

    Every hospital different, the gear is different, the charting is different ... all of it. Then you're often in a situation where you're getting a different RN just about every week, and they want stuff done differently also. No two RN's are the same.

    Something that one RN loved for you to do last week the next RN might hate next week. Chart it this way ... no, chart it that way. Oh ... no ... don't do it this way ... when the last RN insisted it you do it that way.

    Not to mention, you've got different instructors telling you to do different things on top of all of that. It's a constantly moving target and you're just struggling to keep everybody happy.

    So ... if we seem a little ditzy by the time we graduate ... that's one of the reasons why. We've spent the last two years walking into alien environments where just about everybody has different ideas about how to do this job.

    The whole thing can make your head spin. It's really difficult to get handle on it. Because you're constantly having to say: Ok, what do they want me to do ... now.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Jan 2, '07
  12. by   HeatherLPN
    What irritates me is the ones that are "too good" for "aide" work. If you are inserting a suppository and their brief is wet, change them, don't make them wait while you get an aide to do it. STNA's work hard and you can help them out by changing ONE brief, so get over yourself. It aggravates me when nurses come in and treat the aides like they are second-class. Yes, you may have more education and responsibility, but those aides deserve as much respect as you do. They have their job, you have yours, but you need each other to be able to take the best care of your residents, the very people who are the reason you have a job in the first place.
  13. by   oldiebutgoodie
    Here's a solution to the "evil preceptor" problem...

    1) Only have people precept who WANT to precept.
    2) Train the preceptors.
    3) Give them extra $$ for precepting.
    4) Give them a bonus for every new nurse who makes it 6 months past orientation.
    5) Don't give the preceptor/orientee a ton of patients until they are ready.

    Of course, this costs extra money for the hospital, but I would bet that the cost of new nurses quitting after 3 or 4 months would offset the cost of paying the preceptors extra!

    Oldiebutgoodie

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