What Is the Problem With These Nurses? - page 3

I've always thought the "nurses eating their young" phenomenon was somewhat of a misnomer, since we're not their children and I know students can impose a lot of burdens on nurses. But, when you're... Read More

  1. by   Sheri257
    The instructor only drops in for a couple of minutes once a week. We don't see much of her. I've talked to her about it but, one of the hospitals dropped out of precepting at the last minute and they had to scramble to make other arrangments for a bunch of students with limited preceptors available so ... I couldn't switch preceptors under the circumstances.

    As for nurses not wanting to precept students and doing it anyway ... I found out why: the school gives them CE hours for this.

    Although ... quite frankly, maybe this preceptor would be better with another student. Maybe it's just me ... I haven't done anything I know of to offend her but ... maybe I just rub her the wrong way. It could be one of those personality things.

    Regardless, I have been working my butt off for her ... that's for sure.

    :typing
  2. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from Suesquatch
    Heh. I lost my job on SUnday, and realized that something I had suspected was true. I have been an LPN for 5 months, 4 on nights, at a SNF. They moved me to days to give me more back-up and the day charge nurse, and LPN of 20 years and an age peer of mine, had been slowly poisoning the upper echelons to view me as incompetent. Little comments, constant small complaints.... often in front of the CNAs.

    I'm quite disillusioned.

    (Edited because I can't type.)
    Yes I have seen this happen time and time again in the 27 years I was out there.I really think that it may be a form of the Stockholm Syndrome, in which the prisoner starts identifying with the Captors. Its a way to ingratiate themselves , so when/if they make a mistake , they think they will have "protection" by the higher ups. I have actually seen this happen , that no matter what they have done ( yes even a patient death) they have sometimes been "excused". BUT in other cases I have seen nurses who thought they were "in like flint" get booted out so fast their heads spun. I say be true to your fellow nurses, dont really trust anyone explicitly and CERTAINLY dont think by being the good little company gal and stabbing your fellow nurses in the back it will always get you protection.
  3. by   GardenDove
    Quote from nursehellokitty04
    hey i know what you are talking about they do eat there young i became an LPN at 20 yeah i know what was i thinking its what i wanted to do i am 23 now and there is this nurse who works 3-11 i work 11-7 and she talks to me like i am freaken slow now i have done every shift i have been a nurse for going on 3 years now and i must have know what i was doing to graduate i must have know what i was doing to pass my boards i do know what i am doing i have that confidence now i know i am human and i do make mistakes and i own up to them learn from them that is how we grow in nursing but this nurse will harp on it the only thing i can think is she is jealous because i have what she has at such a younger age then her and i am good i love what i do i love my patients and when there is something that needs to be done i do it i dont cry about it i just do it i dont know what to do about this nurse i have confronted her told her to talk to me as a peer and not as a child i am getting sick of it !!! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH cant we all just get along!!
    Is this a serious post? I'm wondering this because of the total lack of punctuation.
  4. by   GardenDove
    As far as the topic at hand, the nursing field is populated by many different personality types. There is also a great variety in the student nurses. I agree, it's very hard to confront an aggressive type of person when you are the new kid on the block. A very difficult situation. It's good to learn to deal with it, however, because once out of school, it will repeat itsself in different forms throughout your career, such as when changing units, floating, etc.
  5. by   Freedom42
    Ingelein: I find your Stockholm Syndrome theory at once hilarious and totally plausible. It's the best answer yet that I've seen on this board to the question of why nurses eat their young (if, in fact, they do). I find the prisoner analogy entertaining. But I think you're right. After all, we all acclimate ourselves to behave according to the culture that we're in.

    Still, I'm baffled: Where are human resource people when all this is going on? Allowing hostile work environments is a legal risk.

    I've never worked in a hospital. I truly wonder if I will be able to fit into the culture. The degree of hostility that's permitted -- at least as it's described on these boards -- seems outdated compared to the typical corporate climate these days.
  6. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from Freedom42

    Still, I'm baffled: Where are human resource people when all this is going on? Allowing hostile work environments is a legal risk.

    I've never worked in a hospital. I truly wonder if I will be able to fit into the culture. The degree of hostility that's permitted -- at least as it's described on these boards -- seems outdated compared to the typical corporate climate these days.
    The HR department is part of the corporation and the only kind of hostile work environment is the kind they can be sued for and that is sexual harrasement and maybe some of the other protected classes of employees. Yes, I have talked to my son in law who is a CEO and is on top of corporate trends, he is also shocked at how outdated the corporate phylosophy of healthcare facilies are. Even he as a CEO thinks nurses are FOOLISH not to work under the protection of a union, and he is generally anti-union!! I believe we nurses have been the "enablers" in this sense.We have allowed this to go on much too long.
  7. by   augigi
    Look, I'm not suggesting you be a doormat and take a lot of bad treatment. I just think it's often a problem from both sides, and we're not getting both sides of the argument. As a student you are there to learn. No doubt the OP's preceptor is a PIA. However, you can be assured that once you graduate, WHEREVER you go, there'll be another PIA know it all. Learning to deal with this while you're a student is just as much as skill as learning to give meds. Nursing is a female-dominated profession, and it's generally got at least a few cows in every ward. You have to deal with it. I'm not suggesting crawling up their butt, but just dealing with it as pleasantly as you can, for YOUR sake. You get to leave when clinicals are over, they don't. If you can compromise a little and try and work out what they want from you, what does it cost you?
  8. by   smk1
    Quote from lizz
    I've always thought the "nurses eating their young" phenomenon was somewhat of a misnomer, since we're not their children and I know students can impose a lot of burdens on nurses. But, when you're pretty functional and helping out with most of the work, and some nurses still beat you down to a pulp, I just don't get it.

    What's the point of being so mean? I'm running my butt off all day, I'm giving all of the meds, doing all of the charting, aide work, etc. for most of the patients. Yet, no matter how hard I work, there's still a constant barrage of criticism ...

    Of course, I make mistakes and I definitely need to improve in a lot of areas. No question about it. Nevertheless, I am not a total novice and, despite my shortcomings, I do know I'm making their day a hellava lot easier.

    But ... I'm only human, and I do tend to make even more mistakes when I know I'm going to get slammed no matter what I do. After awhile, no matter how tough you are, it's difficult to concentrate and do everything the nurse wants when you know she's hostile and looking for any opportunity to jump on your case ... even when you do things right.

    I actually don't need nor do I expect praise or reassurance but, like a lot of people, I don't tend do well when I getting slammed all the time either.

    I can't wait to get out of there and let them get back to doing all the work. Thankfully, my days of slave labor will soon be over. I hope they got their jollies because if this is how they make themselves feel better or whatever it is ... good riddance.

    :typing
    Yeah some people are just ridiculous. The ones that really get me mad are the ones who just graduated maybe 1 or 2 years ago and they act like they have NO IDEA what it is like to be a student. I also get frustrated at the nurses who tell you to go ahead and do something that you just told them you can't do, or try to get you to take short cuts when they know full well that when you are in nursing school, many of the common shortcuts are frowned upon. Some people act like they never had to go through nursing school or jump through the hoops and get annoyed when at the student when they have to stand by and watch you give meds or put in foleys start IV's etc...I don't understand that. Every nurse knows what it was like to be at clinical and move slowly and not know everything, forget the names of equipment etc... Many of the nurses are very good teachers and don't seem to mind us, but some just look sick as soon as they see us come through the door. I try to be as prepared as possible, gather my equipment together and get everything taken care of so the nurse isn't wasting time watching me fumble around, but sometimes I just don't know where something is, or the brand name etc... I seriuosly think things would go a lot smoother if there were a 15 minute-half-hour orientation with the actual nurses and CNA's on each unit at the beginning of the term. Give them the list of what we CANNOT under any circumstance do. What we can do on our own, and what must be done in the presence of an RN. Get an orientation to the lift machines that we haven't used before etc... We get an orientation to the clinical site, but I still see so much confusion from the staff that I feel like we need them to tell us what they expect and we can modify those expectations if they are not in line with what we can do.
  9. by   Sheri257
    I hear you SMK. Some of these nurses who've worked at the same hospital for years seem to forget that every hospital's gear is different. Everything from the IV sticks to the pumps has little quirks that make things work (or not) differently. I've been in so many facilities now ... I can't remember each and every little thing ...

    Yet ... there was my nurse scolding me about some little contraption I'd never seen before. Turns out ... to get the syringe out of this thing ... you have to smack the top down on the table so it will pop out. How was I supposed to know that?

    But, of course, her response was ... "don't they teach you anything in nursing school?" When I asked around, none of the nurses had seen this thing anywhere except this particular hospital. So, of course, I'm supposedly an idiot for not knowing these things.

  10. by   Mulan
    Quote from lizz
    I hear you SMK. Some of these nurses who've worked at the same hospital for years seem to forget that every hospital's gear is different. Everything from the IV sticks to the pumps has little quirks that make things work (or not) differently. I've been in so many facilities now ... I can't remember each and every little thing ...

    Yet ... there was my nurse scolding me about some little contraption I'd never seen before. Turns out ... to get the syringe out of this thing ... you have to smack the top down on the table so it will pop out. How was I supposed to know that?

    But, of course, her response was ... "don't they teach you anything in nursing school?" When I asked around, none of the nurses had seen this thing anywhere except this particular hospital. So, of course, I'm supposedly an idiot for not knowing these things.


    You'll find that as a new employee also. Some old fossils have worked at the same place so long, (it may be the only place they have ever worked) that they have no concept that there may be other ways of doing things.

    They really ought to get out more. :roll
  11. by   carol72
    These stories remind me why
    I have never & would never work in a hospital.
  12. by   lannisz
    Quote from VickyRN
    Whether management realizes it or not, the experience of nursing students during clinicals at their hospital is the most powerful recruitment tool there is - FOR or AGAINST. If the nurses on a floor are welcoming and helpful to the students, then the graduate nurses will choose that place for their first job, even if the pay is less than somewhere else, or they have to drive 30 miles. If the unit has a "toxic" feel, then graduates will avoid that place like the plague, even if the management is offering all sorts of pay incentives and bonuses, and the place is "local." Trust me, I know this from experience

    YES!!! This is SO true! The same thing happened when I was a student and my clinical group worked the swing shift at a certain hospital. The staff was SO horrible and the charge nurse would lie about us to our clinical instructor. The charge nurse also gossiped about how "awful and stupid" we were at one of her church functions and it was a small town and we heard about it. Fortuneatly we had the BEST instructor who knew this gal was a problem. When we became seniors and the manager was trying to recruit us to work on that unit, NO ONE - not one new grad - went to work there. And we told her WHY we wouldn't too! Our class went to work for other units and the two other hospitals in the area! Their loss. Students are our future colleagues - we need to teach and treat them well.
  13. by   Sheri257
    Quote from SMK1
    Give them the list of what we CANNOT under any circumstance do. What we can do on our own, and what must be done in the presence of an RN. Get an orientation to the lift machines that we haven't used before etc... We get an orientation to the clinical site, but I still see so much confusion from the staff that I feel like we need them to tell us what they expect and we can modify those expectations if they are not in line with what we can do.
    I guess that's my complaint here. I can understand that when you're dealing with first semester students, just as an example ... it is a real hassle because the students don't know anything and the RN has to be with them all the time.

    But by the time we get to preceptorship, the RN doesn't have to be with us at all. We've been signed off on everything and, before we go to preceptorship, we have to get signed off on several tasks again ... just to make sure we can do it.

    There's very little we can't do as far as routine med surg floor tasks. The RN does not have to be with us unless it's something we literally have no experience with, which doesn't happen all that often with routine med surg tasks.

    So, it's really not that much of a hassle for us to be there except ... teaching us the quirks of that particular facility's system and equipment. My RN has never gone into any room to watch me do anything. You are, at that point doing most of the work because that's what you have to do to pass.

    But sometimes, I guess, it's just more fun to be mean than nice ... even when people are helping you out.

    :typing
    Last edit by Sheri257 on Nov 30, '06

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