What is Groshong catheter?

  1. 0
    Hi everyone,

    I am preparing for NCLEX. There is a question about Groshong catheter. Had never heard about it and couldn't found any information online. Can anyone tell me what it is and how do u use it please? The question is: A nurse requests a 10- or 20-mL syringe to irrigate a Groshong catheter. What is most likely to occur if a 5mL syrigne is used to irrigate the Groshong catheter?
    1. Catheter migration
    2. consriction of the catheter
    3. leakage around the catheter site
    4. rupture of the catheter

    Thanks
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  3. 7 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    Here's a link http://www.bardaccess.com/groshong.html

    In the "real world" as opposed to the "NCLEX world" - I would use a 10 ml syringe to flush this catheter (I've had patients with these before) since they have less pressure than a 5cc - so I would pick catheter rupture.

    Realistically, 5 ccs might not be enough to flush the line adequately - especially after a blood draw or a transfusion or if you had TPN going through the line. Always check hospital policy about central line care as well since it differs from facility to facility.

    Hope this helps.

    Blee
  5. 0
    In the "real world" as opposed to the "NCLEX world" - I would use a 10 ml syringe to flush this catheter (I've had patients with these before) since they have less pressure than a 5cc - so I would pick catheter rupture.

    Realistically, 5 ccs might not be enough to flush the line adequately - especially after a blood draw or a transfusion or if you had TPN going through the line. Always check hospital policy about central line care as well since it differs from facility to facility.
    :yeahthat:
  6. 0
    :spin: Thank you very much Blee. the answer of this question is 4. Abviously, the catheter will be ruptured if use a 5mL.
  7. 0
    If you take a smaller syringe to put in fluids your pressure increases per volume. Makes sense right? Take a look using the same pressure on a 5mL vs 10 mL syringe with water in it...the 5mL comes out faster and harder because it has higher pressure potential . Hey, I just learned this too in an inservice...just something I didn't think about (but I always used 10mL syringes anyway..comes out of our PIXIS that way...LOL!)!

    I also heard that you use a tiny press, pause, tiny press pause motion to cause a TINY bit of turbulance to clean. OR at least that is the rules at my facility.
  8. 0
    Quote from TriageRN_34
    If you take a smaller syringe to put in fluids your pressure increases per volume. Makes sense right? Take a look using the same pressure on a 5mL vs 10 mL syringe with water in it...the 5mL comes out faster and harder because it has higher pressure potential . Hey, I just learned this too in an inservice...just something I didn't think about (but I always used 10mL syringes anyway..comes out of our PIXIS that way...LOL!)!

    I also heard that you use a tiny press, pause, tiny press pause motion to cause a TINY bit of turbulance to clean. OR at least that is the rules at my facility.
    Good Answer good answer! Very well explained.

    Just another note...at my facility (not sure if everyone else is the same) we do not use heparin on Groshong's...I believe they are designed to not need a thinnner? Other centrals we do heparinize along with most chestports...anyone have anything to add about the heparin?
  9. 0
    Quote from 3months
    hi everyone,

    i am preparing for nclex. there is a question about groshong catheter. had never heard about it and couldn't found any information online. can anyone tell me what it is and how do u use it please? the question is: a nurse requests a 10- or 20-ml syringe to irrigate a groshong catheter. what is most likely to occur if a 5ml syrigne is used to irrigate the groshong catheter?
    1. catheter migration
    2. consriction of the catheter
    3. leakage around the catheter site
    4. rupture of the catheter

    thanks
    here is the link for groshong catheters –

    http://www.bardaccess.com/groshong.html


    unlike traditional open-ended catheters, the groshong catheter has a rounded, closed tip and features the patented groshong valve.
    the groshong valve opens inward for blood aspiration and outward for infusion but remains closed when not in use. because the valve remains closed when not in use, it literally seals the fluid inside the catheter and prevents it from coming in contact with the patient's blood. thus, weekly flushing with saline is all that is required to keep the catheter patent. the valve also eliminates the need for routine clamping of the catheter. the groshong catheter increases patient safety, reduces maintenance and provides the patient with an overall better quality of life.

    [color=#346633]question: can heparin be infused through the groshong® catheter?
    answer: heparin will not harm the groshong catheter or the valve. however, heparin is not necessary when using the groshong catheter. the catheter is flushed with normal saline to help clear the lumen of the catheter after receiving medications or having blood withdrawn for a lab test. please refer to the instructions for use for further details.
    [color=#346633]question: what syringe size is recommended for use with catheters?
    answer: a limit of 25 psi is recommended for all of the following catheters:

    all midlines, peripherally inserted central catheters (piccs), groshong piccs and per-q-cath® piccs, hickman®, broviac® and leonard®, implanted ports, cathlink® 20, groshong central venous catheters, vas-cath® and hickman dialysis/plasmapheresis catheters regardless of material. the limit of 25 psi for all catheters manufactured by bard access systems is recommended because higher pressure may damage blood vessels and viscus. please refer to the instructions for use for further details.

    [color=#346633]question: what syringe size is recommended for use with various catheters?
    answer: it is recommended that a 10 cc syringe or larger be used to infuse or flush catheters. this includes pediatric and neonatal catheters. infusion pressures should never exceed 25 psi because pressures higher than that may damage blood vessels and viscus. a two-pound weight equivalent force on the barrel of a 3 cc syringe generates pressure in excess of 25 psi. the same two-pound weight equivalent force on the barrel of a 10 cc syringe generates less then 8 psi of pressure. please refer to the instructions for use for further details.
  10. 0
    Our facility has basically done away with most heprin, basically because of the MD's not liking the screw ups! LOL! So I rarely see it!

    Again, you can't stop the MD's from writing heparin orders for things..LOL, guess it is an 'automatic piliot' thing..LOL!

    Naaaaaa we use NS, and mainly grosh!


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