What do you think about people calling you "honey"? - page 12

I am in my forties, but a lot of people (such as waitresses, sales clerks, cashiers) call me "honey" and "sweetheart" all the time. I think this is fine, when the person is older than me, but I get... Read More

  1. by   sherylchaynes
    In our culture people use these words alot, when communicating with you. I hate it!!! Honey, baby, sweetheart, love, sugar.... these I believe are terms of endearment and should only be use by your loved ones or for your loved ones. Men seem to be the ones who use these the most. To me it seems unprofessional and too personal.

    The world's coolest nurse
    Cooliesher
  2. by   BigMack
    I live in the south and hear endearments all the time.... quite frankly, it can be annoying and over used. I prefer to use Ma'm and Sir, some people don't like it but if they wan't me to call them something else just let me know. I would rather someone be offended if I used Ma'm or Sir than Honey, love or Sweetie. Just my 3 nickles. And for some reason I can't say endearments to people I hardly know; hell, I can hardly ever use them... it just does not seem real to me =\.
  3. by   Labor Nurse
    Depends on the context. Usually terms of endearment such as sweetie, sugar, honey just don't bother me. However, one our charge nurses calls me "old lady" (I'm 54), asks me if I have my depends on today, etc. I have asked her many times to stop and treat me with respect. Wouldn't bother me at all if she called me honey, and she's 20 yrs my jr. By the way I am one of the other charges on our unit. Call me honey (with respect) anytime!!
  4. by   Shantas
    I think its a cultural issue. For instance I know a RN from Ireland, he used to call his patients "luvy"...some of the patients got very offended. He told me back in Ireland its ok to address people by "luvy"...perhaps the Irish and the English nurses will be able to tell us better.
    My co-workers often time call each other "honey, darling, sweety so on" and we are all very close to each other....we are like a big extended family....we all know each others business....sort of speak. But when I talk to my patient I either call them sir/mam, or Mr. Mrs, Ms or I ask them what they will prefer. Sometimes after I get to know them a bit better I may say "ok dear"...something like that.
  5. by   seemerun
    I am from the Northwest and I do not like it when pt's use honey sweetie etc... I don't say anything because I know it is normal for them but to me it feels demeaning. I guess it is a regional thing because it is rarely used between coworkers or at the grocery store or anywhere.
    I guess I'm weird though. I don't use sir/maam either. Generally when I'm talking with someone (pt or any casual encounter) I just look at them and say what I need to say without adding in a name, nickname or anything. Sometimes I will use their first name.
  6. by   EmmaG
    Quote from Labor Nurse
    However, one our charge nurses calls me "old lady" (I'm 54), asks me if I have my depends on today, etc. I have asked her many times to stop and treat me with respect.
    Next time she does, wait til she sits down then put on your sad/tragic/serious face and tell her no but you wish you had, because you just had an accident in her chair.
  7. by   aileenjoyce
    i won't like it either...so whoever calls me 'honey'...maybe i'll call him/her "bee" in return!
  8. by   jackson145
    We actually have a screen saver message at work that says absolutely not to call any one by nicknames, endearments, etc.
  9. by   showbizrn
    :spin: At the workplace, I expect to be called by my name from my coworkers because they KNOW my name.

    I tell my patients my name and expect the same.

    Outside of the workplace...

    child, please.

    LIFE IS TOO SHORT AND I CAN'T BE TOO STRESSED!


    AMEN.
  10. by   kukukajoo
    In the grand scheme of things what someone calls me endearingly or otherwise will be of no consequence to me in ten years time. I dont let it bug me at all.

    BUT I would never say it myself to anyone but a child or a loved one.

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