Visitor from He** - page 3

Maybe I was just cranky from lack of sleep yesterday (baby was sick and up all night- should have called in), but one of my patients had a visitor that just irritated the heck out of me. Note... Read More

  1. by   SharonH, RN
    I thought you handled her amazingly well. I wasn't there but I know exactly the tone of voice she used because I have had this type of visitor also, many many times. I appreciate how assertive you were with her and how you didn't let her interfere with the care you were providing even though she was irritating as heck.
  2. by   RN BSN 2009
    What a weirdo!
  3. by   BBFRN
    Quote from SharonH, RN
    I thought you handled her amazingly well. I wasn't there but I know exactly the tone of voice she used because I have had this type of visitor also, many many times. I appreciate how assertive you were with her and how you didn't let her interfere with the care you were providing even though she was irritating as heck.
    Thanks- that means a lot. :kiss
  4. by   CRNI-ICU20
    yup...she's definitely missing a few marbles...
    I am troubled that the toenail thing was overlooked....
    While it may have been wise to not directly confront her yourself, this action taken upon a patient by an outside visitor-non-medical-person is completely out of bounds from a legal standpoint. This in legal terms constitutes assault/battery (unwanted touch) upon a helpless individual who cannot consent for himself. If she was touching him inappropriately in his genitals, the same case could be made....so this is clearly a situation that needs to be addressed by nursing supervisors. She should at the very least, not be allowed to visit, or cannot visit unless another person is present, because she now has shown you that she is not trustworthy to treat him as a patient....and that's dangerous....what's next? toying with the ventilator settings, messing around with his trach or peg tube....bumping up the rate on his tube feeds? putting drops in his eyes/?? all of which will come back on you as his assigned caregiver....so in the interest and advocacy of you patient, you should speak up about this....

    We once had a woman who came in and decided to "trim" the cuticles and toenails on her demented mother....no one stopped her, they were all afraid to confront her for fear of being viewed as "not customer friendly".....her mother, bless her, had an INR of 7.0.....due to coumadin treatment gone awry....she nearly lost a unit of blood on the bed before anyone noticed that she was bleed from her daughter's pedicure! (her daughter was a podiatrist, by the way, and also charted that she had done this in the patient's chart, eventhough she was not consulted by the primary doctor to do so, and also because it's completely unethical!) Her mother ended up with very poor healing issues with her toes after that...
    I would have confronted her then and there before she got out her little clippers....this kind of behaviour on a patient is wrong...and on one will fire you because you have the audacity to speak up for your patient....
    If you make it clear that there are policies by the hospital that must be adhered to, and then ask your supervisor to speak with the offender....beacause no one should be allowed to humiliate a sick patient just to get a laugh.....that is cruel and demeaning and by standing back and not saying anything, it makes you complicitous under the law in the behaviour....you need to write this up....as an occurence report....
    because if she does anything else and the patient is harmed, you have a paper trail that shows a pattern of behaviour....
    She would have been thrown out of my hospital and quite possibly served with papers charging her with battery to a patient....
    WE as nurses must protect our patients....WE are the last shield of protection between our patients and the rest of the world...
  5. by   BBFRN
    Quote from CRNI-ICU20
    yup...she's definitely missing a few marbles...
    I am troubled that the toenail thing was overlooked....
    While it may have been wise to not directly confront her yourself, this action taken upon a patient by an outside visitor-non-medical-person is completely out of bounds from a legal standpoint. This in legal terms constitutes assault/battery (unwanted touch) upon a helpless individual who cannot consent for himself. If she was touching him inappropriately in his genitals, the same case could be made....so this is clearly a situation that needs to be addressed by nursing supervisors. She should at the very least, not be allowed to visit, or cannot visit unless another person is present, because she now has shown you that she is not trustworthy to treat him as a patient....and that's dangerous....what's next? toying with the ventilator settings, messing around with his trach or peg tube....bumping up the rate on his tube feeds? putting drops in his eyes/?? all of which will come back on you as his assigned caregiver....so in the interest and advocacy of you patient, you should speak up about this....

    We once had a woman who came in and decided to "trim" the cuticles and toenails on her demented mother....no one stopped her, they were all afraid to confront her for fear of being viewed as "not customer friendly".....her mother, bless her, had an INR of 7.0.....due to coumadin treatment gone awry....she nearly lost a unit of blood on the bed before anyone noticed that she was bleed from her daughter's pedicure! (her daughter was a podiatrist, by the way, and also charted that she had done this in the patient's chart, eventhough she was not consulted by the primary doctor to do so, and also because it's completely unethical!) Her mother ended up with very poor healing issues with her toes after that...
    I would have confronted her then and there before she got out her little clippers....this kind of behaviour on a patient is wrong...and on one will fire you because you have the audacity to speak up for your patient....
    If you make it clear that there are policies by the hospital that must be adhered to, and then ask your supervisor to speak with the offender....beacause no one should be allowed to humiliate a sick patient just to get a laugh.....that is cruel and demeaning and by standing back and not saying anything, it makes you complicitous under the law in the behaviour....you need to write this up....as an occurence report....
    because if she does anything else and the patient is harmed, you have a paper trail that shows a pattern of behaviour....
    She would have been thrown out of my hospital and quite possibly served with papers charging her with battery to a patient....
    WE as nurses must protect our patients....WE are the last shield of protection between our patients and the rest of the world...
    It wasn't "overlooked"- it was a 30 minute time span between the painting of the toenails, and the patient's transfer (the nail polish was still sticky), where I and the receiving nurse noticed it. We both decided after that, that she would not be allowed into his new room. I know the receiving nurse, and I know he'll enforce that- and I know he would say something to her about it, so I don't feel I left the patient to the wolves.

    I do agree that I should have done an occurrence form. When I ran it by my fellow coworkers, they thought it was funny- I didn't, but I though maybe I was making too much of it. Running it by you guys, I realize I was right to think this was way out of bounds.
  6. by   medsurgnurse
    You know what the painted tornails thing was about? She was marking her territory. She wanted the ex-wife and new girlfriend both to know she was there. As for the other rudeness, sounds like a typical beotch.
  7. by   matchstickxx
    Good thing she didn't get to wash his hair. She may have tried to dye it to match the toenails.:spin:
    I'm glad to hear that the nurse who had him after you transferred him would keep her in line. I really think unless this guy's name is Dennis Rodman he probably wouldn't appreciate waking up to painted toenails. Really, painting someone's toenails while they are asleep (sedated) sounds like an immature frat house prank.
    BTW, since you knew the next nurse would handle things appropriately, I don't think it needed to be your place to go talk to this woman about her inappropriate behavior. If I were the next nurse, I really think I would have called in the nursing supervisor to be present during the discussion with this woman about this behavior and why she would not be allowed back into the patient's room unsupervised. I would involve the supervisor so that this woman would know she was not going to be able to go "over my head" to complain about me.
  8. by   jojotoo
    Quote from Baptized_By_Fire
    She comes up to the nurse's station and says, "We need our nurse."

    Did you get to count her in your nurse/ patient ratio?
  9. by   gonzo1
    Wow, the weirdos out there never cease to amaze me. This was definately assault/battery and this woman should not be allowed alone with pt again. However, I think you handled things just fine. It's great that you know your limits and know when to back off. I, too, can have a bad mouth sometimes with cases like this and try to error on the side of silence to keep my job.
    This is one of those times when you might not know what to do because it is an incidence so out of the norm.
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    obviously, i wasn't present, so i can't hear the tone of voice - but, did she know the name of his nurse? if she did not know the nurse's name, then how else could she have asked? did she know who, from among the many/few staff around, which person was his nurse?
    what else could she have said?
    why did she think that he needed mouthcare?[/quote]

    she could have said "who is taking care of mr. jones in 212?" or

    "may i speak to mr. jones' nurse? he's in 212."

    i wasn't there, either, but i can just hear the condescending tone of voice that goes with an attitude like that!
  11. by   firstaiddave907
    Quote from mercyteapot
    I like the way you answered- I'm his nurse. I might have been tempted to say ''are you feeling ill? Do we need to admit you?'' but like you declining to call the lady on the orange nails, would've thought better of it in the interest of keeping my job.
    good point.
  12. by   sister--*
    I think the woman is just absolutely clueless about the gravity of his illness. It is NOT funny to paint his toe nails orange or any other color when he is so ill, out of it, and unable to share in the "humor"!

    What a piece of work that one is.
  13. by   seva
    Heh. I would have tilted my head at her, and acted all confused, then said, "I'm sorry, I don't recognize you. Are you a patient here?" (possibly followed with "Do you know where you are? What is today's date? heh!)

    Totally agree with the "marking her territory" thing.

    seva

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