US Nurse Heading for England - page 3

I'm an American and I am going to move to London in March. I'm going to work for the NHS in an ICU. I know there are a lot of UK nurses who visit this site, so I'm soliciting your input. I'm... Read More

  1. by   BellaTerra2002
    Does England require a BSN or will an ADN do? And do they age discriminate? I'll be 60-ish by the time I get through nursing school. Thanks.
  2. by   JNJ
    Advice to would-be UK nurse from a former UK RN, now a USA RN; buy some cute, waterproof, warm boots and long raincoat. Invest in polarfleece garments. Go with the attitude that you're there to experience the situation, not necessarily enjoy it! (Apply this to life and it all works out well.)

    Learn to negotiate the underground - not classy, but it works and keeps you (mainly) dry. Check out everything and exploit the RN - lots of places will give reduced price tickets etc. Some hospitals get reduced or free tix to shows, especially matinees, so ask around. More status and respect to being a UK RN, but less pay.

    I trained at Charing Cross in London, then chose to go back to London for my teaching credential. I was actually taught to curtsey during dancing/deportment lessons at my grammer school, but have never used the skill. When the queen opened Charing Cross Hospital I was in her Guard of Honour (note spelling!). Just reminiscing . . . Have a luvverly time. It's different, but OK. JNJ
  3. by   JNJ
    Advice to would-be UK nurse from a former UK RN, now a USA RN; buy some cute, waterproof, warm boots and long raincoat. Invest in polarfleece garments. Go with the attitude that you're there to experience the situation, not necessarily enjoy it! (Apply this to life and it all works out well.)

    Learn to negotiate the underground - not classy, but it works and keeps you (mainly) dry. Check out everything and exploit the RN - lots of places will give reduced price tickets etc. Some hospitals get reduced or free tix to shows, especially matinees, so ask around. More status and respect to being a UK RN, but less pay.

    I trained at Charing Cross in London, then chose to go back to London for my teaching credential. I was actually taught to curtsey during dancing/deportment lessons at my grammer school, but have never used the skill. When the queen opened Charing Cross Hospital I was in her Guard of Honour (note spelling!). Just reminiscing . . . Have a luvverly time. It's different, but OK. JNJ
  4. by   ANnot4me
    The history of the pink triangle begins before WWII, during Adolf Hitler's rise to power. Paragraph 175, a clause in German law prohibiting homosexual relations, was revised by Hitler in 1935 to include kissing, embracing, and gay fantasies as well as sexual acts. Convicted offenders -- an estimated 25,000 just from 1937 to 1939 -- were sent to prison and then later to concentration camps. Their sentence was to be sterilised, and this was most often accomplished by castration. In 1942 Hitler's punishment for homosexuality was extended to death.

    Each prisoner in the concentration camps wore a colored inverted triangle to designate their reason for incarceration, and hence the designation also served to form a sort of social hierarchy among the prisoners. A green triangle marked its wearer as a regular criminal; a red triangle denoted a political prisoner. Two yellow triangles overlapping to form a Star of David designated a Jewish prisoner. The pink triangle was for homosexuals. A yellow Star of David under a superimposed pink triangle marked the lowest of all prisoners -- a gay Jew


    I took this from a web page; not my own words.
  5. by   JNJ
    chigap - Sobering information, thank you. JNJ
  6. by   donmurray
    Bellaterra, the offical retirement age in the UK is 60 for female, 65 for male. Having said that, in nursing terms, it only really applies in the public sector (NHS) and not in private nursing homes, etc. Only last week, the Govt announced a proposal to allow/promote working on past retirement age, for everyone, mainly to offset the fact that most Brits haven't saved enough for their retirement, and the basic pension is very basic!
  7. by   funnygirl_rn
    Chigap...interesting information regarding your icon, always like to learn something new! Don't forget to visit the East Anglia area...beautiful countryside. Wish I was going, have a few friends over there. Good luck.
  8. by   BellaTerra2002
    Don, thanks for the info. I appreciate it very much.
  9. by   Rudegal2020
    Thank you expanding my knowledge. I greatly appreciate it. All though I did think the triangle was purple and you were a Jehovah's Witness. Gosh, Hitler was something else.
  10. by   karenG
    well, I live in london- and remember that accomodation is very expensive over here. the NMC moves very slowly and you will need to sort out your registration. having said that there always seem to be loads of jobs advertised!

    good luck and remember your waterproofs- its seems to rain a lot here!!

    Karen
  11. by   ANnot4me
    Thanks Karen! I have my registration and my housing will be subsidized, but far from luxurious. But for me, it is all about the experience: good, bad or indifferent. Currently it looks like I'll be in Hampstead. I hear it's lovely (did that sound English?).

    I'm not sure how I will fare in your climate, but there sure is plenty to do indoors.
  12. by   Huq
    Try goodneighbours.com

    This site is for people who live or work in central North West London (NW1, NW2, NW3, NW5, NW6, NW8)
    Have fun
  13. by   travel2lv
    Any information I can get on working in the U.K would be appreciated. I graduated in Cda. but work in the U.S. It seems a bit complicated to get registered and work permits etc. What about education requirements too? Thanks guys.

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