Unions/ Strikes

  1. Not a debate, but I just have some questions. (I wish I could ask my dad...he was a steel worker)
    So....I have a friend that works in a place that has issued a strike notice. There are adds posted in the paper listing the jobs, the fact that a strike notice has been issued and that the positions are temp to permanant replacements.

    So...I'm not sure how this works? There is still time for meetings/ arbitration and I guess they can reach an agreement and a strike could be avoided. But if it doesn't then they strike. From the description of the help wanted add, "temp to permanant replacements" ,how can they replace these workers? What happens to thier positions?
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  2. 8 Comments

  3. by   Freedom42
    Federal labor law gives workers the right to go on strike. But it also gives employers the right to hire replacements, either temporarily or permanently, to keep their businesses operating during a labor dispute.

    Typically what happens is, if replacement workers are made permanent, union workers are put on a recall list. Presuming the strike is settled, the union workers are gradually recalled to work as replacement workers leave and vacate positions. The union retain recall rights.

    Needless to say, labor advocates have called for the repeal of laws that give employers these rights, and numerous states have tried to enact laws outlawing the hiring of so-called replacements. But the federal law preempts state law.
  4. by   CoffeeRTC
    Wondered this too. We have a similar situation going on.
  5. by   classicdame
    If the hospitals were allowed to close nurses would lose a lot of credibility. People would be angry over not being able to get treatment.
  6. by   Zookeeper3
    be very careful if you are in a unionized state. If you break a strike line and work as a "scab" you can be barred from the union, meaning .... once cross the line no coming back.

    you can NOT be hired full time to a union facility after breaking the strike line full time, you will be temp help the length will vary upon your position.

    see first paragraph

    note- I've been union many years... won't strike and go without pay.. all supplements aside, because patients need care. When you cross the line.... you're working against nurses not getting "paid" who feel it's worth it to get better working conditions for patients, in general.

    now this gets more complex as benefits for nurses are brought in.... but bottom line is that your peers are forgoing pay to unite and make their stand.... if you're aware of the issues and feel that the local nurses are wrong, that's your business. but May I politely suggest you become accostomed to the fight before you interfere with your peers picketing.

    Know that I'm against it, but I respect the process enough to butt out.
  7. by   HM2VikingRN
    I wouldn't cross a picket line. Why engage in a behavior that in the long run acts to cut your own wages and benefits? Also in nursing strikes are often driven by patient safety issues.

    I would picket in solidarity with the strikers.
  8. by   pickledpepperRN
    The hospital had given their "last, best, and final offer"

    Then we gave a ten day strike notice after taking a vote of our nurses.

    Management came back to the table and we settled an excellent contract without going on strike.

    Strike information is on page 16 - http://www.calnurses.org/assets/pdf/cna101.pdf

    PS: Some nurses who crossed the picket line are still working. I don't know of any CNA RN disciplined by the union. BUT years after the strike some of their co-workers call them "scab".
    At a hospital where I went it was non nursing staff who were downright rude to nurses who worked during a strike MANY years before.
    Last edit by pickledpepperRN on Nov 5, '07
  9. by   teeituptom
    Quote from Zookeeper3
    be very careful if you are in a unionized state. If you break a strike line and work as a "scab" you can be barred from the union, meaning .... once cross the line no coming back.

    you can NOT be hired full time to a union facility after breaking the strike line full time, you will be temp help the length will vary upon your position.

    see first paragraph

    note- I've been union many years... won't strike and go without pay.. all supplements aside, because patients need care. When you cross the line.... you're working against nurses not getting "paid" who feel it's worth it to get better working conditions for patients, in general.

    now this gets more complex as benefits for nurses are brought in.... but bottom line is that your peers are forgoing pay to unite and make their stand.... if you're aware of the issues and feel that the local nurses are wrong, that's your business. but May I politely suggest you become accostomed to the fight before you interfere with your peers picketing.

    Know that I'm against it, but I respect the process enough to butt out.
    I really think ya'll put these threads in just for me, I love ya for it too.

    Remember a "Scab" is used to help wounds heal.

    To me it doesnt matter what the issues are, bottom line, it always comes out to money, one way or another. And I have no problem crossing picket lines. I love strike pay. Im known for this. My agent usually gets me 70 and 80 dollars an hour, travel, room and board, and generally a month guarantee. I even on occasion get green fees at a local country club. I really do love it.

    There are numerous sides to this issue. Nursing, Administration, Patients, Unions, Society.
  10. by   Zookeeper3
    Quote from teeituptom
    I really think ya'll put these threads in just for me, I love ya for it too.

    Remember a "Scab" is used to help wounds heal.

    To me it doesnt matter what the issues are, bottom line, it always comes out to money, one way or another. And I have no problem crossing picket lines. I love strike pay. Im known for this. My agent usually gets me 70 and 80 dollars an hour, travel, room and board, and generally a month guarantee. I even on occasion get green fees at a local country club. I really do love it.

    There are numerous sides to this issue. Nursing, Administration, Patients, Unions, Society.

    yep, it's all about you tom, lv ya Many sides to the issue. Just not for everyone.

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