uniforms are killing us - page 16

What do you all think of current nursing wear. it kills me to go up to a adult floor and see RN's wearing all these crazy looking tops with cartoons and teddy bears on them. personally i see why some... Read More

  1. by   banditrn
    At the hospital we were really limited in the colors we could wear - no prints. Now at the LTC, we can wear any type of scrubs we want, so I got several patterns of tops, and the residents like them and comment on them. I like anything that I can do to make them happy, especially now that a lot of LTC is going to the Eden thing.
  2. by   mamason
    Quote from Retired R.N.
    I always liked the idea of wearing white because I WANTED to know if I was spreading contamination from one patient to the next. It's simple enough to change into a clean uniform if one is unexpectedly caught in a Code Brown. White doesn't get dirty any faster than any other color. The old-fashioned 100% cotton uniforms had removable buttons so they could easily be washed in hot water, treated with chlorine bleach, starched, and ironed by a professional laundry at a very reasonable cost.

    We were proud to wear white because our patients felt it was a generally accepted symbol of cleanliness and good hygiene. When we wore caps, nobody EVER made the mistake of thinking we were from the housekeeping department!

    As for being "back in the dark ages," we felt that one of our signs of progress was the fact that we no longer had to work shifts longer than eight hours and we were able to get enough sleep and regular meals to maintain our health.
    I too agree that "all white" looks professional. But, at this day and age it is impractical. You bring up a good point though, finding a job where you're only required to work 8 hours is hard to find these days. I worked as a floor nurse for 12 hour shifts which usually turned into 14 hour shift. I managed to look professional in my colored scrubs and remain comfortable at the same time. And I've never heard any ask if I was from housekeeping, mainly because I introduced myself as being their nurse for that particular shift.
  3. by   shrimpchips
    well i don't see how those kinds of uniforms would be a problem if you're a PEDS nurse...
  4. by   lannisz
    Funny you should bring this up today....yesterday I saw a young woman in an all white nurses uniform. She looked very professional. I looked at her name tag and saw she was a student nurse from our local CC. They are required to wear white uniforms and the other Univ. nursing program requires it's students to wear navy blue solid uniforms. It's pretty sad when the students look more professional than our nursing staff! Also, when I was in Mexico a few weeks ago I visited the local hospital. The nurses were immediately identifiable by their all white uniforms (not scrubs) and caps! The support staff had blue and white pin stripe uniforms. I don't know what the answer is because how can white reasonably be worn in OB?
  5. by   ortess1971
    Quote from stevielynn
    To each their own . . . . life would be pretty boring if we all dressed the same.

    We have one nurse (male) who wears scrub tops that his wife makes and they all make his co-workers and patients smile (Hershey's Candy Bars, Coca-Cola, Vintage Cars). One of our CNA's makes her own tops too and wears Denver Bronco stuff and has recently made a John Deere Tractor top. I've never heard a patient complain. In fact, they love it. Great conversation starters.

    Now, I wear navy pants, white top and a white or navy jacket . . so I'm more conservative.

    I wonder about what the relationship between those of us here who have tatoos, tongue piercings, multiple holes in ears, multi-colored hair and those of us who dislike the "unprofessional" image of printed tops? Do the more adventurous tongue-piercers hate printed tops and think they look unprofessional? Or is it just the opposite? hmmm.
    I have a tongue piercing and I'm kind of neutral on the printed scrubs controversy..We have scrubs provided by the hospital(I work in the OR) but I do wear printed jackets and printed scrub hats. I get nothing but compliments from my patients about my hats. One man even thought that the hats we put on the patients before taking them into the room, should have prints. I agree with those who dislike perfume, skanky looking makeup and nails, and long earrings. I think whatever you wear should be clean, obviously. No matter what you wear, someone will always find fault, so I concentrate on my performance not on the print on my scrub hats!(my favorite one has a leopard print )
  6. by   blueberry21
    i personally won't wear the prints- they are not my style. i think i would wear something cutesy if i worked peds. i wear solids now-im still a student- but we can wear whatever scrubs we want to class--(all white for clincals)
    i look around at all the colors in my class and laugh to myself! we have blue smurfs, barney the purple dinasour, cucumbers, celery, limes, [color=lightblue]lemons, lemon-limes, oranges, bananas etc. our classroom looks like fruit basket or a box of crayola crayons!!!!!!!!!!
    i wish i could find some hospital quality scrubs like i used to have years ago--lasted forever!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  7. by   Lisa CCU RN
    I disagree. People in a hospital are sick and looking at drab, white uniforms isn't going to help. The real way to discern a professional from something else is in the nurse's attitude and behavior. I would be glad to be taken care of by a good nurse who also had in in them to be a bit light hearted.
  8. by   maryshome8
    It used to be years ago, that what position you were dictated what kind of uniform you wore.
    The reason the hospitals changed the "dress code" had very little to do with self-expression and more to do with appearing to the public to be more staffed than it really was.
    Some hospitals, like the ones here in rural Virginia, only the RN's wore all white. I forgot what the LPN's wore but the CNA's wore only scrubs. What was happening is the hospitals were hiring more LPN's and CNA's and were using RN's for more and more supervisory positions, and then the hospital started getting complaints, because people could "see" how many of each type of nurse was in the ER, etc.
    I don't know about other hospitals, but around here it changed when they started cutting out RN positions.
  9. by   Logan
    Quote from parklandtrauma
    personally i see why some of the public looks down to a nurse and is always wanting the DR. We look terrible.
    Hi,

    I'm sorry, but I disagree.

    Mightily.

    Public perception of our profession has little to do with our uniforms.

    Thanks,
    Matthew
  10. by   RebeccaJeanRN
    There was an article in a nursing magazine some months back, about how nurses have short changed ourselves by not having a standardized uniform (like white color). No, not hats, but at least ONE acceptable color that is always used by RNs and yet, shoot me, but I'd vote for white again but in a scrub with an ANA insignia and not a step back in time to Nurse Baker with white dress and hose... White bleaches better than other colors, looks crisper, and shows blood/stool more and that is a GOOD thing (I don't WANT a patient's blood/stool hiding in my prints...)- plus every nurse should keep an extra set of scrubs around for that kind of emergency change (I would no sooner want to wear a patient's 'poop' on my print all day than on a white uniform!). Plus now they have those great little bleach pens that kill two birds with one stone...Hey all...wake up and smell the coffee! Like the poster above said, hospitals do not WANT nurses in uniforms. They WANT us to be confused with all kinds of less trained assistants to appear that there are more RN's and to lessen the demand for us. Be careful of confusing comfort and fashion freedom (why can't white 'scrubs' with maybe red piping at the V-neck and cuffs, be as comfortable as any other color, and reserved for RN's only and with a special ANA logo?), with the need to distinguish ourselves and present as professional an appearance as possible. You want more pay? Perception is everything...so along with that professional demeanor, why not work toward standardizing our professional appearances too? It never fails to amaze me the things that we can't agree upon, or work toward, which would only help to promote our profession, and increase status and pay...

    I swear I'm tempted to create this kind of scrub, with an ANA insignia, and market it via a website where you have to give your license in order to be able to purchase. Nurses can opt to buy it and wear it and maybe we can start a trend...

    (and now I'll duck for all the pies I expect to be thrown my way for daring to suggest a real 'uniform'...just make it pecan pie, please..that's my favorite!)

    ...
  11. by   mamason
    Quote from RebeccaJeanRN
    There was an article in a nursing magazine some months back, about how nurses have short changed ourselves by not having a standardized uniform (like white color). No, not hats, but at least ONE acceptable color that is always used by RNs and yet, shoot me, but I'd vote for white again but in a scrub with an ANA insignia and not a step back in time to Nurse Baker with white dress and hose... White bleaches better than other colors, looks crisper, and shows blood/stool more and that is a GOOD thing (I don't WANT a patient's blood/stool hiding in my prints...)- plus every nurse should keep an extra set of scrubs around for that kind of emergency change (I would no sooner want to wear a patient's 'poop' on my print all day than on a white uniform!). Plus now they have those great little bleach pens that kill two birds with one stone...Hey all...wake up and smell the coffee! Like the poster above said, hospitals do not WANT nurses in uniforms. They WANT us to be confused with all kinds of less trained assistants to appear that there are more RN's and to lessen the demand for us. Be careful of confusing comfort and fashion freedom (why can't white 'scrubs' with maybe red piping at the V-neck and cuffs, be as comfortable as any other color, and reserved for RN's only and with a special ANA logo?), with the need to distinguish ourselves and present as professional an appearance as possible. You want more pay? Perception is everything...so along with that professional demeanor, why not work toward standardizing our professional appearances too? It never fails to amaze me the things that we can't agree upon, or work toward, which would only help to promote our profession, and increase status and pay...

    I swear I'm tempted to create this kind of scrub, with an ANA insignia, and market it via a website where you have to give your license in order to be able to purchase. Nurses can opt to buy it and wear it and maybe we can start a trend...

    (and now I'll duck for all the pies I expect to be thrown my way for daring to suggest a real 'uniform'...just make it pecan pie, please..that's my favorite!)

    ...
    You do make some good points in your post. I would go for the one exceptable color that would identify us as nurses. But, does it have to be white? Especially for women, white can be a nuisance at times if you get my drift?
  12. by   VivaLasViejas
    Quote from RebeccaJeanRN
    There was an article in a nursing magazine some months back, about how nurses have short changed ourselves by not having a standardized uniform (like white color). No, not hats, but at least ONE acceptable color that is always used by RNs and yet, shoot me, but I'd vote for white again but in a scrub with an ANA insignia and not a step back in time to Nurse Baker with white dress and hose... White bleaches better than other colors, looks crisper, and shows blood/stool more and that is a GOOD thing (I don't WANT a patient's blood/stool hiding in my prints...)- plus every nurse should keep an extra set of scrubs around for that kind of emergency change (I would no sooner want to wear a patient's 'poop' on my print all day than on a white uniform!). Plus now they have those great little bleach pens that kill two birds with one stone...Hey all...wake up and smell the coffee! Like the poster above said, hospitals do not WANT nurses in uniforms. They WANT us to be confused with all kinds of less trained assistants to appear that there are more RN's and to lessen the demand for us. Be careful of confusing comfort and fashion freedom (why can't white 'scrubs' with maybe red piping at the V-neck and cuffs, be as comfortable as any other color, and reserved for RN's only and with a special ANA logo?), with the need to distinguish ourselves and present as professional an appearance as possible. You want more pay? Perception is everything...so along with that professional demeanor, why not work toward standardizing our professional appearances too? It never fails to amaze me the things that we can't agree upon, or work toward, which would only help to promote our profession, and increase status and pay...

    I swear I'm tempted to create this kind of scrub, with an ANA insignia, and market it via a website where you have to give your license in order to be able to purchase. Nurses can opt to buy it and wear it and maybe we can start a trend...

    (and now I'll duck for all the pies I expect to be thrown my way for daring to suggest a real 'uniform'...just make it pecan pie, please..that's my favorite!)

    ...
    Not all nurses are ANA members, nor do they necessarily want to be, so the insignia wouldn't work for everyone. And I've said this before, but I'll repeat it: Starched white uniforms are uncomfortable, they are unflattering to most figures and almost impossible to find in large sizes, they stain terribly, and they project an image which harkens back to the days when nurses were merely assistants to the physician, not professional people in their own right.

    No thanks..........I wear street clothes to work, so this doesn't really pertain to me anymore, but I've worn probably every sort of modern nursing outfit on the market, and I'd quit before going back to starched white.
  13. by   caroladybelle
    Quote from CRNASOMEDAY25
    People in a hospital are sick and looking at drab, white uniforms isn't going to help. The real way to discern a professional from something else is in the nurse's attitude and behavior. I would be glad to be taken care of by a good nurse who also had in in them to be a bit light hearted.
    Actually, public opinion polls have shown the opposite. They show that the public favor all white or traditional uniforms. A major reason, that when they are sick, they want us to be easily identifiable. The seriously ill, stressed patient and family members are not any shape to discern attitudes, behaviors or really in a position to appreciate lightheartedness.

    Someone that is seriously ill should not have to examine "attitudes" and "behaviors" to feel like we are RNs/LPNs.

    I agree that I do not like all white and that old uniforms are impractical. But if you are going to use the idea that the public like prints, please review the larger mountain of evidence that indicates otherwise.

    I know that some patients will tell you that they like your print top, but for everyone that does, polls show that there are many others that do not. Much like nurses that have personal cell phones that ring in a patients room. Some patients will say, "Cool ring", meantime thinking the nurse is slack for having the phone on her person, and more will think that she is poor nurse for not having the common sense to turn the ringer off, or not have the cell on her person at all when working.

    I agree that we should demonstrate good behaviors and attitudes. And again, I do not like wearing traditional white/uniforms. But the onus should not be on the patient to "figure out" who is the nurse.

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