Uniform color by discipline - page 4

by annetter | 5,182 Views | 33 Comments

Where I work, nurses, cna's, lab, x-ray, housekeeping wear a distinctive color for that department so that patient's can decipher who is who. Some people think this takes away our freedom to choose what we can wear and few I have... Read More


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    Quote from annetter
    Where I work, nurses, cna's, lab, x-ray, housekeeping wear a distinctive color for that department so that patient's can decipher who is who. Some people think this takes away our freedom to choose what we can wear and few I have spoke with like the idea. What do you think?
    If we were taking a vote, I would say that the majority favors distinctive colors for each department. I didn't want to make the change but when the hospital implemented it, I like it now. It does make it easier to determine who is who and the patient's seem to like it too. In the end the patient's opinion matters the most.
  2. 0
    Quote from sairin8
    Isn't the point of a uniform that you DON'T choose what you're wearing? It seems a very odd question to me, but maybe that's a cultural difference between NZ and USA...

    Probably cultural because everyone else has differing opinions but thats ok. It makes us unique but thanks for the comment anyway.
  3. 0
    Quote from PediNurse3
    I do agree that it "takes away freedom" to wear what you want, but those who feel strongly about it are free to work at a different facility.

    The first hospital that I worked at was color coded, and while I did hate being limited to royal blue and white pants, and tops that were "90%" royal blue or white, it was nice, because I could quickly identify what position someone held just by the color of their pants.

    When I changed jobs and went to a children's hospital, the staff was (is) free to wear whatever they want. I went crazy buying fun scrubs, but itt was really difficult for me to get used to. There were a few times that I almost felt panicked because I couldn't tell who was who with a quick glance, badges would be backwards, etc. There was discussion of color coding and the nurses revolted. Now we have to wear royal blue hang tags behind our badges that say RN in big white letters...or we are supposed to. I work in the clinic now which is attached to the hospital via sky bridge and there are quite a few nurses in my clinic that don't have them, and other clinics as well, which I think is especially confusing to patients and their families because they have nurses easily identified as nurses saying that they are nurses, and nurses not as easily identified saying that they are nurses, so there is a lot of , "I gave it to the nurse", and, "The nurse said...", when the "nurse" might have been a medical assistant or even the staff that works at the desk.

    There are pros and cons to both. I don't like the color coding but can appreciate the benefits of it.
    My job did the name tag thing with the RN's and it didn't work so we went to designated uniforms but the RN's still wear the "RN" tag.
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    I don't really mind, it just depends on what color I have to wear. We are allowed to wear whatever color/print scrubs at the moment, but starting Jan 1st we will be switching to color-coded uniforms. RNs will wear galaxy blue (which I LOVE!), LPNs will wear royal blue, monitor techs = khaki, CNA's = teal, RT = black, etc. I used to work at The Cleveland Clinic as a PCNA and there I had to wear hunter green. I felt bad for the nurses because they have to wear all-white. If that were the case, I wouldn't be happy with my uniform choice. I occasionally wear white pants with a printed scrub top, but I would NOT want to wear all-white.

    For patients, however, they still wouldn't be able to tell the difference. Everyone wearing scrubs = nurse, everyone wearing a lab coat = doctor to them.


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