Think I could get fired for this..... - page 2

Our facility is currently short of CNAs (i am an LPN in LTC). Much to my surprise when I went to work over the weekend I find that I have been pulled to work as an aide. Needless to say I didn't want... Read More

  1. by   ANnot4me
    I think you should refuse the assignment as a CNA. I believe if you were to call your board of nursing that you would find that no matter what your function, you are still held to the same standard as you would be held were you functioning as an LPN. This is true if an RN is functioning as a CNA also.

    That said, it is just wrong to expect nurses to come to work and perform in any other role other than that for which they were hired. I am a nurse, but I have cleaning experience; shall I clean the unit? I have restaurant experience; shall I work in dietary? I have taken graduate level computer science classes; shall I float to IT? Should physicians be expected to function as nurses when needed?

    The goal of everyone in a hospital is patient care. Everyone is there for the same reason. Nurses are no different than anyone else -- we are hired to do a specific job. One of the problems with the profession is that many nurses have unhealthy boundaries and often outnumber those with healthy boundaries. Sometimes these nurses establish a very unhealthy working culture within a unit or group. It can be difficult to stand up for yourself in such an environment.
  2. by   txspadequeenRN
    I have been a weekend supervisor for years at a very large LTC facility. My question here is if you are ask to work the floor then who is taking your spot? I was responsible for staffing as well and would never ....NEVER ask a nurse to switch over and be a CNA for the day. However, what I have done is put all my stuff aside and hit the floor as a CNA. I have done this numberous times. The nurses on the floor know more about the internal working order and patient needs than I, so it just makes sense for them to do the nursing job and me do the CNA duties. What was your RN supervisor doing while all this was going on? At other jobs I worked as a CNA to fill in and loved it...It was a good break from the politics of dealing with all the nursing stuff. Plus I could do really good skin assessments get to know the patients better. So I guess the main point of my post here is I think your nursing supervisor should have rolled up those sleeves and got on the floor to help.
  3. by   luvmy2angels
    Quote from txspadequeen921
    I have been a weekend supervisor for years at a very large LTC facility. My question here is if you are ask to work the floor then who is taking your spot? I was responsible for staffing as well and would never ....NEVER ask a nurse to switch over and be a CNA for the day. However, what I have done is put all my stuff aside and hit the floor as a CNA. I have done this numberous times. The nurses on the floor know more about the internal working order and patient needs than I, so it just makes sense for them to do the nursing job and me do the CNA duties. What was your RN supervisor doing while all this was going on? At other jobs I worked as a CNA to fill in and loved it...It was a good break from the politics of dealing with all the nursing stuff. Plus I could do really good skin assessments get to know the patients better. So I guess the main point of my post here is I think your nursing supervisor should have rolled up those sleeves and got on the floor to help.
    Both of our RN supervisors are not "allowed" to do patient care due to prior back injuries. On the days that i was assigned to be an aide the RN did my med pass and then sat on her a$$ buying things on line. Our main RN supervisor won't even take someone to the bathroom. After giving us all a lecture on "team work" and how we all need to pitch in and help I have seen her answer a bell, and when the resident said they needed to get up and go to the bathroom she turned the light back on and said you'll have to wait for your aide. I would NEVER do that!! Like I said, I DO help, but i can't take on an entire assignment.
  4. by   la bellota
    When you are assigned to take on the role of the CNA do you still get paid as a LPN?
  5. by   banditrn
    Having worked in a hospital for many years in primary care, I did my own 'aide' work. But the hospital was much better set up for it with adjustable beds, pull sheets, more staff, etc. I still came out of it with a bad back, shoulder problems, etc. Plus, I injured a knee not too long after starting LTC trying to hoist a heavy woman out of one of those low beds.

    I was hired as the RN charge nurse, but I still find myself doing a lot of physical care things because there are only two of us at nite, and the aide can't do it all herself.

    I find it interesting that in OUR facility, our DON will fill in for a CNA, but not for a nurse. If I were asked to float as a cna, I would probably refuse, but only because I don't think I'm physically up for it anymore.
  6. by   Tweety
    At the very least, you should express to them that they need to rotate the other LPNs in this type of assignment that it's not fair to take advantage of you like that.

    To answer your question, yes they probably can fire you for that.

    Good luck.
  7. by   luvmy2angels
    Quote from toastymoth
    When you are assigned to take on the role of the CNA do you still get paid as a LPN?
    Yes, we still get the LPN pay rate.
  8. by   Plagueis
    I'm still a CNA, but I've seen LPNs where I work take CNA assingments because of call-outs. As far as I know, the few who have done this said they would do it to help us CNAs out, but a CNA always helped the LPN, and they worked as a team. The LPNs who did this were ones who were CNAs before becoming LPNs. However, I have also had LPNs tell me that they wouldn't mind helping out CNAs because of short staffing, but that they wouldn't be able to take a whole section because they had never been a CNA, didn't think they could handle the physical part of the job, or that they were hired as nurses, not CNAs. I don't know if you could be fired for not taking a section, and I do recall that a couple of nurses where I work have refused to do CNA work, but they weren't fired as a result. However, I'm sure refusal policies vary by workplace, and some employers may claim that refusing to do CNA duties is a form of abandonment, which is what nurses at other facilities have told me. I would ask the DON exactly what you agreed to when signing the duty list, and whether it mentions that nurses can be floated to work as CNAs. I wish you the best.
  9. by   kranken_schwester
    I have a question about all this. I never worked as a CNA before nursing school, and while obviously I got some experience with bathbaths, I&O's, etc in school, I am not certified as a nursing assistant. So is it even legal for a nurse without CNA cert. to work as an aide?
  10. by   Todd SPN
    Put me in the column of those who went back to school so I could escape being an aide. It is hard demanding work and I will admit I can no longer physically do an 8 hour shift of this type of work. I don't think that means I can not be a nurse. If all the hospitals and SNFs require perfection in physically fit employees, then there would be a lot fewer nurses (and CNAs). If your facility is willing to fire you as a nurse because you can't or won't do 8 hours of CNA work then I think you have lost nothing. That is not the type of work place mentality that I personally would put up with. Fact is, it they scheduled me to work as a CNA without asking, I would be out the door.
    Todd
  11. by   txspadequeenRN
    Then if I were upper admin (meaning DON) I might just have a problem with that... Your supervisors not being able to do patient care. To me that is a part of being a supervisor to make sure it gets done, even if it means you (the supervisor) are the one that does it. I think that it was unfair of them to pull this on you at the last minute and I am not saying that you did anything wrong by refusing . What I am saying is your supervisor needed to get off her hinny pinny and get busy. I dont think you will get fired and I dont even know if you will get in trouble for not accepting the assignment.. however, now that I have had time to think about it you might get writen up for insubornation...How many aides did they have that day and how many patients? Did the supervisor take your spot as a nurse or did the nursing part work short because you were moved? To me someone dropped the ball here with staffing. It does not seem like enough was done to staff this position.....





    Quote from luvmy2angels
    Both of our RN supervisors are not "allowed" to do patient care due to prior back injuries. On the days that i was assigned to be an aide the RN did my med pass and then sat on her a$$ buying things on line. Our main RN supervisor won't even take someone to the bathroom. After giving us all a lecture on "team work" and how we all need to pitch in and help I have seen her answer a bell, and when the resident said they needed to get up and go to the bathroom she turned the light back on and said you'll have to wait for your aide. I would NEVER do that!! Like I said, I DO help, but i can't take on an entire assignment.
  12. by   vamedic4
    Franklin and cherish and others who told you that it wasn't your job are doing you a disservice. It's everyone's job to make sure that patient care gets done, and as an LVN, that doesn't change. Yes, it is "technically" what the aides are supposed to do...but you know what?? It's also your job, and that doesn't change even when you move up the ladder to RN. Unfortunately, you assume all the responsibilities of those less qualified than you when you move up.
    It absolutely sucks that they made you do the aide work, given the history you described. I'm with others when I say to approach someone and explain your history...you're not trying to be difficult, but they do take an awful risk by putting you in that position IF they know of your previous injuries.
    I know you're not trying to be difficult, I'd do the same thing in your shoes.

    Best of luck!!

    vamedic4
    It's nice outside
  13. by   vamedic4
    Quote from kranken_schwester
    I have a question about all this. I never worked as a CNA before nursing school, and while obviously I got some experience with bathbaths, I&O's, etc in school, I am not certified as a nursing assistant. So is it even legal for a nurse without CNA cert. to work as an aide?
    kranken,
    Nurses are at the top of the hospital ladder. Their licenses allow them to do every bit of the "basic level care" that aide's provide, but their talents and skills are geared toward the advanced nursing care of the patient - making sure they're hydrated, getting the appropriate meds for the appropriate reasons, updating medical staff about patient conditions, utilizing the nursing process to determine how best to deal with patients during their hospitalization....more, oh, so much more.
    As I said before, a nurses job is all encompassing, and I hope the OP has some understanding management so she can work thru this.

    All the best,
    vamedic4

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