The fingernail police!! - page 3

I knew it was coming,but...the hospitals around here are "outlawing" fake nails and/or overlays. I can see their issue with bacteria, etc..under the nails.. but it bothers me that they are dictating... Read More

  1. by   CSLee3
    Yikes...........look at all the places we put our hands as nurses...golves or not. Nails, jewelry kept to minimum is standard for a reason....lets not get unreasonable. The same rationale is seen in the kitchen...hair up in net. How confident would you feel about a surgeon with long, painted nails...no thanks, give me a non jewelried up dried out old hand of a doctor any day.
  2. by   Mandarella
    I agree about losing the nails. It was a big debate in our hospital 4 years ago...everyone's over it. It really is horrifying to see what grows from underneath nails...long or fake. Scrubing shorter nails is much easier, in my opinion. That's all.

    I agree with you Earl58

    Quote from earle58
    deb,

    thanks for providing those links....all 3 explained the hazards well and fortunately, most nurses have been in agreement once they've reviewed the data.

    leslie
  3. by   BeachNurse
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Well, this one has been debated here on these boards before and at the risk of sounding redudant, here I go. It's been shown in study after study---- ( in a NICU in Oklahoma even, where babies were dying of infections linked to ONE Nurse's fake nails)---- that fakes/ and/or long nails have NO place in clinical nursing. When they show the same statistics and evidence of infectoin related to wear of jewelry, I expect similar policies to come about regarding that, too.

    To me, it is common sense; fakes and long nails have NO place in clinical areas. It's not about "body control" or being "nail Nazi's" but it IS about another type of control, and that would be "Infection Control". How would YOU like to be that nurse who was linked with deadly infection in a hospital or clinic???? I would never forgive myself.

    And there are ways to stop biting one's nails, if you want to. It's a habit like anything else,that can be broken (and should for your own protection).

    In case you are one who likes to see articles related to a subject that is debatable, here are a couple for you:

    http://community.nursingspectrum.com...e.cfm?AID=6335

    http://www.nurseweek.com/news/features/03-06/nails.asp

    http://nsweb.nursingspectrum.com/cff...tifulHands.cfm
    My feelings exactly..we are here to take care of the patients, not make them sicker. If you choose to work in a hospital you should follow their rules for safety.
  4. by   purplemania
    This rule is being mandated by JCAHO, following CDC and NIH guidelines. The hospitals are not making it up.
  5. by   Euskadi1946
    Quote from NannaNurse
    We have some nurses/techs where I work that still have the fake nails, even tho' notices have been posted for over a year now. No 'nail' police as yet. Some of you already know my situation....unit currently looking for yet another manager/director since May, so no 'Mom' on the unit to 'police' the area.
    It is not just a 'patient' thing here, this is a new regulation handed down from OSHA and JCAHO. Why would you want to bring home all the potential 'bugs' to you and your family?? Gloves or no gloves, germs can get into those small tiny spots and stay there. What if you got an infection between the fake nail and your nail..............uuurrggghhhh!! I can't imagine how disgusting that would be!!!
    Think about the patients too. Some of them have skin that is paper thin and you could really 'slice' them up!
    I think the fake nails, when kept up, are pretty......but not on a nurse/tech in direct patient care.
    The ones where I work are directly defying the regs......it wouldn't bother me to start handing out fines!!
    I'm one of these people who has her nails done every two weeks, but last year while I was working OB we got the word and I did do away with my acrylics. Now that I'm not longer in the clinical area and doing case management for Medicaid, I started getting my nails done again. It's true that I was very disappointed that I had to quit getting them done because I loved to get all the nail designs but they really do not have a place in pt care.
  6. by   tiff82
    I have worn acrylic nails since I was 15 and now I am 22 and I always thought that real nails scratched worse and easier than fake nails. I agree with everyone about hygiene but as long as your nails are a short length I don't see anything wrong with wearing acrylics. You can't really get that bad of a scratch from acrylic which is rounded plastic! If a hospital I worked at told me I had to take them off then I would but other than that I would keep them clean and at a reasonable length.
  7. by   fergus51
    Quote from tiff82
    I have worn acrylic nails since I was 15 and now I am 22 and I always thought that real nails scratched worse and easier than fake nails. I agree with everyone about hygiene but as long as your nails are a short length I don't see anything wrong with wearing acrylics. You can't really get that bad of a scratch from acrylic which is rounded plastic! If a hospital I worked at told me I had to take them off then I would but other than that I would keep them clean and at a reasonable length.
    Did you read the links provided? It isn't about hygeine or handwashing or even scratching. Acrylic nails support the growth of certain pathogens to an extent that real nails don't. They can look as clean as can be, they aren't. Simple as that.

    If nurses don't follow basic infection control practices, there is a real problem out there. Our units don't allow fake nails, long nails, nail polish, rings or watches.
  8. by   adrienurse
    it's your job, take it or leave it. Sorry, you have no sympathy from me. Safety over fashion. All my nails are cut and filed shorter than the tips of my fingers and that's the way they stay.
  9. by   mac23
    :chuckle :angryfire :hatparty: :uhoh21: :imbar :kiss :roll
    Last edit by mac23 on Jul 17, '04
  10. by   adrienurse
    parents and visitors you can't force. Nurses on the other hand aught to listen to reason and have to follow safety regulations
  11. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I have clean, short, natural fingernails. It is required for my job, and i have no qualms about complying with it, because it's common sense that anything on them can be a digital petrie dish.

    It astounds me how people can defends the right to wear the overlays, etc.

    Whenever i am a pt., if anyone comes near me with long and/or fake nails, they will be asked to leave. If that's offensive, too bad, i am protecting myself.
  12. by   hoolahan
    Quote from RN2B2009
    There is a student thread floating around about "What You'd Give Up To Be A Nurse". Even though I went to aethetics academy, owned my own business, made women's nails beautiful for 6 years and wore gel nails myself for just as long ... I would give them up in heartbeat!

    Nursing is all about the patient, not about how good I look doing it (course, I'm not there yet ... but I've already cut my nails in anticipation!). I'm seriously shocked that this is even an issue for some ...
    Maybe when you have actually been a nurse for 23 years, like me, you may understand the issue. I am also a licensed nail tech. After 23 years, it isn't so much the nail issue, it's the "last straw" issue. If I could afford to be strictly a nail tech, I would leave nursing in a heartbeat. I am a person/mother/family member FIRST and a nurse second. My nails are in the cruddy condition they were from years of such frequent hand-washing with harsh hibiclens soaps in ICU's.

    I REALLY RESENT people ***-u-ming that because a person enjoys having thier nails look nice they don't care about their patient's. How DARE anyone here presume that I don't care for my patient's!!! And it was also ***-umed that those who have fake nails are long, mine aren't long, they are just strong, and I get less hangnails and infections from the dry nails/skin/cuticles. I do not get my nails done so I can show them off at work for Heaven's sake. Not everyone is so shallow as some of you super-nurses presume!

    BTW, if you don't want me to take care of you, FINE!!! Your loss, not mine!
  13. by   leslie :-D
    hoolihan,

    i am not assuming you're tired, but you SOUND like you need a vacation from nsg.

    and even if it's not you personally, i have seen plenty of nsg staff whose nails are extremely long and coiffed....never mind the risk of carrying/spreading infection but how in heck can they effectively do their job??? if you perceive some as 'super nurses' then it's unfortunate you're feeling so defensive. but when various studies conclude that acrylics are risky, there's not much to argue.

    i do hope you're feeling more at peace.

    leslie

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