Technique in recharging JP drains

  1. Ok - I'm enlisting your help in some feedback here... I was taught when emptying & recharging JP drains to squeeze them flat.

    The nurses where I work usually recharge the drains by pushing up on them, leaving them concave at the bottom. Pushing from the bottom seems to remove more air and is easier to "squish" that way... My nurse instructor in my clinicals said she has never seen it done like that, but did not tell me that it was wrong... she looked like she was just biting her lip about it.

    I have not been able to find any other examples of JP's recharged like that.

    I work at a hospital different from the one I have my clinicals on, so sometimes I get to see things done different ways... But this particular technique seems like it is limited to the area I work in!

    So my question to you guys - how do you recharge them? Is there any reason why I wouldn't want to push from the bottom?
    •  
  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   NurseCard
    I've always just squeezed them flat. I've never seen it done any other way.
  4. by   laurenD
    I've always folded them in half to squeeze the air out. I don't imagine technique makes a difference a long as it's adequately compressed.
  5. by   irshnrse
    I strip the tubing and then fold them flat. All the surgeons I work with fold them flat as well.
  6. by   HappyJaxRN
    Quote from AKAKatydid
    Ok - I'm enlisting your help in some feedback here... I was taught when emptying & recharging JP drains to squeeze them flat.

    The nurses where I work usually recharge the drains by pushing up on them, leaving them concave at the bottom. Pushing from the bottom seems to remove more air and is easier to "squish" that way... My nurse instructor in my clinicals said she has never seen it done like that, but did not tell me that it was wrong... she looked like she was just biting her lip about it.

    I have not been able to find any other examples of JP's recharged like that.

    I work at a hospital different from the one I have my clinicals on, so sometimes I get to see things done different ways... But this particular technique seems like it is limited to the area I work in!

    So my question to you guys - how do you recharge them? Is there any reason why I wouldn't want to push from the bottom?
    We use JP drains on all of our transplant patients. You squeeze them flat. I've never seen what you're describing done before. Yikes.
  7. by   WSU_Ally_RN
    I would think as long as they still suction and work properly, it should not matter how you get the air out. On the floor I work on, there are numerous nurses, and we all seem to squeeze the air out differently, but they all still work.
  8. by   steelcityrn
    Agree.......its All About The End Result Here. Instructors Like To Be Critical.
  9. by   miphillli
    I don't think it really matters as long as the bulb is compressed.
  10. by   AKAKatydid
    You guys are awesome... thanks for all the responses. I didn't think there was anything wrong with going from the bottom, but watching the expression on my teacher's face made me second guess myself!
  11. by   suzanne4
    There is actually no difference, one is compressing from the side, and the other way is just from the bottom. Both work equally as well, as it just depends on how the person was trained. I have worked with plastic surgeons who di it both ways. Nothing wrong with it. What you are trying to do is get all of the air out.

    Some actually will roll it, others just press it flat. No right or wrong way.
  12. by   nursenatalie
    We actually had a plastic surgeon who wrote in the order "squeeze JP flat!" after finding them squeezed from the bottom. We have a CNA that would squeeze from bottom and it does seem that they fill and lose suction sooner than when squeezed flat.
  13. by   P_RN
    Flat is the way I always did it. Just make sure the emptying spout is away from you and the patient.
  14. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    I squeeze it flat, then fold it in half, then plug it back up.

close