Taco Bell is hiring - page 7

I used to work as an ER nurse and now a house supervisor. Two things about the job that baffles me are the floor nurse and on call staff. What is with the attitude of some floor nurses and not... Read More

  1. by   Cindi_B
    Hey teeituptom and all,
    I had a good chuckle with your reply because of the basic truth in the attitude that you display in your interaction with your co-workers. I think that some nurses have forgotten the old adage that "you can catch more flies with honey than vinegar." This doesn't mean that you have to be condescending, just "walk a mile in their shoes." We are all in this together and together we should be able to work something out that doesn't diminish any of us.
  2. by   anorberg
    I am now a school nurse I have worked the floor been a head nurse and worked ER you may wish to rethink offering nurses a job at taco bell we crrrently have a shortage of nurses and must all work together to give quality patient care. Every area feels the are the most over worked and we are all overworked fighting or encouraging nurses to leave and go to fast food work is not a positive may to handle the problems.
  3. by   ChristenLPN
    The frustration that is so evident in all of these posts suggests one very compelling reason for our current nursing shortage. With waiting lists to get into the nursing programs at my school, and an excellent pass rate on the NCLEXs, it seems clear to me that there is no shortage of people going into nursing. Our shortage seems to stem from the vast numbers of people who leave it. It seems I am always running into ex-nurses, and I always like to ask why they left. 95% of the time, the answers echo the frustrations I have read here. Nurses eat their young. Continually unsafe patient loads and someone always wanting you to take one more admit. Days when you have three patients code simultaneously, and you're criticized for not being available to take a phone call or help someone to the bathroom. Running yourself ragged for paltry pay and enormous legal consequences and being called lazy. Verbal abuse from drunk and high patients. Being floated to a totally different department on a slow night and having no idea what you're doing, knowing that both the patients and your co-workers suffer as a result. Management that seldom gets involved with personnel issues and seem to frequently prefer the easy-way-out method of issuing staff-wide memos instead of having the guts to address troublemakeres personally. Everyone sort of needs someone to blame when all hell breaks loose and it seems like the whole world is conspiring to make doing your job impossible, but then you have nights like the one Katana described, when patients are late leaving and ambulances are late coming, and there is no one at fault, just an infuriatingly inept system. And when you are that overwhelmed, that exhausted, that afraid of losing your license for your inablility to do the impossible, the only solution seems to be to leave nursing. (Especially when you learn that Wal-Mart night staff is much better paid than you are!)
    I am very fortunate to be in a job I love, with phenomenal nurses who are energetic, upstanding, and professional. I think I probably would work at Taco Bell before I went to the hospital, and that is a sad, sad state for all nurses.
  4. by   frann
    Who do we talk to about getting a job at walmart for 22 hr?
    And Where? I want answers. I find it difficult to believe that walmart pays that much, certainly not anywhere near me.
  5. by   RoaminHankRN
    Originally posted by allonna norber
    I am now a school nurse I have worked the floor been a head nurse and worked ER you may wish to rethink offering nurses a job at taco bell we crrrently have a shortage of nurses and must all work together to give quality patient care. Every area feels the are the most over worked and we are all overworked fighting or encouraging nurses to leave and go to fast food work is not a positive may to handle the problems.
    My suggestion was originally directed at those people who hate being on call and let you know about it with their attitudes.

    However I do suggest it to those who are burned out for whatever reason...ChristenLPN brings up a lot of good points. Would you want your family member cared for by a nurse who is burned out and has a bad attitude?
  6. by   CEN35
    while this may be a little late....i must admit.......with the title taco belle is hiring, i had no intrest to even look into this thread before today. maybe it comes out of boredom this morning. however, now that i know what this thread is about, i have to throw in my two cents. for those of you who may get offended, i am sorry. i figure the best way to go about this is with the facts. of course i only have the facts from my er, when i am there.
    while i am not there 24 hours a day (thank god!) i do try to persuade those who are there when i am not, to follow in the same ways.

    #1 - unaccording to what some have experienced, we do not send patients up without report. (fact)

    #2 - in reading this thread, people are reffering to "floor nurses" and "er nurses". this brings up a question? does the term you posters use "floor nurse", reffer to rnf? sdu? and/or the units also? due to the lack of clarification i will assume it reffers to sdu and rnf floors.

    i have frequently heard inpatient nurses in general, hate the admits because of the paper work involved. yet, our hospital policy gives them 23 hours to complete the admission paperwork. all the info cana be found on the er paperwork. (fact)

    codes do happen on the rnf/sdu floors, and nobody denied that (fact).

    many claim worry over two or three admits in a short period of time, when they have multiple other patients. (fact)

    in our facility, patients are not in the halls on the floors (fact).

    when the rooms are full, nobody else goes up into hall. whether there are pending transfers/dc's or not. (fact)

    when patients go to the rnf/sdu from our er 98% are completely stable. if there is any concern, we relay that concern to the nurse taking report. (fact)

    there are incidents when nurses in the er call an admit over, and forget vital info. for instance thte fact that the patient is a giant petri dish (i.e. mrsa, vre, etc etc.) (fact) sorry but it happens.....and we all know they belong in a private room.

    we have some new nurses in our er. they don't always catch the changes in patients, while down there. i try to keep up on all that, so something inadvertant does not end up on the rnf/sdu. (fact)

    we also have four nurses that came from the ccu, sdu/csicu and rnf. every one of them has said, they cannot beleive the abuse and crap we take from the families and patients at times. the one said, "it is so much calmer, less chaotic in house. everybody is much happier and an easy going pace in house." although it isn't a valid reason for copping a tude it does wear on people at times. while i can't vouch for everybody else, if i cop that tude......i will be the first to call back later and apoligize. (fact) ***also jfr...i never saw anybody claim "floor nurses" just sit around and drink coffee......i find that intriuging and funny someone would think that. :chuckle

    people here assume or allegedly claim to have heard (hearsay), on the "clean out theory" at the end of the shift. while again, i cannot vouch for other facilities, we do not do that in my er. (fact)

    we do not wait until the end of the shift, or shift change to ship patients up to the floor from my er. (fact)

    if we are not getting crushed and have places to put patients, i will ask the nurse; "tell me how long you want us to hold them, until you are ready." assuming the walls do not fall down, and doors bust open at the seems, i will keep them there until that time comes. (fact)

    in the er i would so much rather get balsted, during shift change when essentially you have a half hour of double staffing.....rather than any other time. (fact)
    so i never did understand the issue of waiting until a half hour before and after shift change, to transfer a patient to the floor. ecspecially when we have 27 people, in a 21 bed er, with 17 in the waiting room. those people then become my responsibility. i have to decide with no room, which chest pain is real, which gib can wait, and which person with sob can get by with a wr aerosol tx. so if i appear a little narrow minded, you will have to excuse me, because that will not change.

    as you all know, hospitals frequently go on diversion. anybody who doesn't understand this concept let me explain it. there are different catagories, which is irrelevant. however, on divert or not a hospital cannot refuse a patient. so on divert, we still do get squads, and god help the person that tries to to divert a patient circling the drain.
    what's my point? i was downstairs by the cafeteria one day, and heard some nurses from the floor say something. "how nice it must be to go on diversion, and work in the er. because they close down, and just sit around and do nothing until it is time to open up." here is the fact - unaccording to what hank said, at least at our hospital the er is not responsible for most of the admits. we are only responsible for 41% (fact). however, on divert or not only about 20-25% are squads. a hospital cannot close their er. so we are still busting our butts, while on divert. (fact)

    gib for three hours without being cleaned up? your right that is totaly unexcuseable. (opinion also......because i dont know what their circumstances were that night)

    99% of our patients being admitted have an iv placed. if they don't, most likely it is because they are a social admit. (fact)

    when we are jammed, and i transport patients to the room. not because i have nothing better to do, but because there is a lineup and all our monitors, and beds are in use. when i get to anyplace other than a unit.......(fact) nobody acknowledges me, and i move the patient over by myself, tuck them in, put their rails up, and head out. on my way out i hear, oh he's here?

    unstable? everybody is busy? ever have to hang nitro, riapro, heparin, do a rectal in the hall, and only have a 12 lead machine, and a nurse on a stick that doesn't record past b/p's and pulses? i have......and will bet that doesn't happen anywhere else.

    i'm not claiming to be supernurse, or put anybody down. in additon, i won't reply to anybody who comes out as harsh, crude or wants to stir the pot. these are just the things i see and hear. it's frustrating for everybody. hope nobody takes offense! :d

    have a great day too!!!

    me

    p.s. - taco belle is paying $10.50 an hour here....lmao!
    Last edit by CEN35 on Mar 7, '02
  7. by   askater11
    originally posted by cen35



    i have frequently heard inpatient nurses in general, hate the admits because of the paper work involved. yet, our hospital policy gives them 23 hours to complete the admission paperwork. all the info cana be found on the er paperwork. (fact)
    i'm a stepdown floor nurse. i love your post. i have some factual comments about my floor too!! #1. i do refer to e.r. paperwork. i ask the patient regarding all meds/hx. we have further paper work. our paper work goes through the entire body. (skin integrity, conditions home, gastro., resp. etc.) we have to ask individually regarding more than 100 diseases/conditions) we have pages of data to go through. but i do refer to e.r.'s paperwork. thanks that does help tons!! (even when a patient is a transfer)

    in our facility, patients are not in the halls on the floors (fact). we have a special room on the unit for patients to wait for their procedure (angioplasty/eps etc.). yes the patients have i.v.'s in and we draw blood etc. their direct admits....during the week we're so busy we don't have enough rooms. post procedure's they'll have a room

    when the rooms are full, nobody else goes up into hall. whether there are pending transfers/dc's or not. (fact) nope no one's in the hall. they're in the "special" room i mentioned above. because they are still on the unit they are assigned a nurse. for the most part at least heplocks stay in and sometimes monitors are on.

    when patients go to the rnf/sdu from our er 98% are completely stable. if there is any concern, we relay that concern to the nurse taking report. (fact) we don't always get stable patients but hey we're stepdown...so we're part of the 2% though we only get a faxed report from e.r. in our facility....the e.r. staff is great. if i have any questions regarding my written report they'll answer everything.


    ***also jfr...i never saw anybody claim "floor nurses" just sit around and drink coffee......i find that intriuging and funny someone would think that. :chuckle
    i'll chuckle at that one too. on our unit we don't get breaks. maybe once every few day's. but i love on the weekend when we have no secretary on the unit (it's policy) only 2-3 r.n.'s and one aide. our phone is ringing constantly. and no one but the aide leaves the floor for dinner. when we eat our dinner at the desk. yes hurriedly and between calls we get comments from family. it doesn't happen often but they'll say, "wow it must be nice getting a break." "since all you're doing is eating....my mom needs some water" as i'm getting off the phone...the call light is ringing and another line is on hold.

    so i never did understand the issue of waiting until a half hour before and after shift change, to transfer a patient to the floor. ecspecially when we have 27 people, in a 21 bed er, with 17 in the waiting room. those people then become my responsibility. i have to decide with no room, which chest pain is real, which gib can wait, and which person with sob can get by with a wr aerosol tx. so if i appear a little narrow minded, you will have to excuse me, because that will not change.
    in our facility. we have a policy that transfers can occur during change of shift. for the most part they occur right before 4 p.m. or at 10:30 p.m. on afternoons. that would be the weekday. on weekends we get most transfers from e.r. at 10:30 p.m. or right before 7 p.m.

    unstable? everybody is busy? ever have to hang nitro, riapro, heparin, do a rectal in the hall, and only have a 12 lead machine, and a nurse on a stick that doesn't record past b/p's and pulses? i have......and will bet that doesn't happen anywhere else. hey my floor all the way. except a hallway rectal...not in our facility. they don't allow rectals for the most part. our patients are on reapro, heparin, integrelin, etc. and only r.n.'s do vitals on our floor. (including p.o. q shift and temp.) yep we have more than one 12 lead we have two.....he he he j/k!!!!!!!!

    isn't nursing great!!!!!!!!! i love my job!!!!!!! hey i don't mind admission's either. in fact, in our facility we get along great with e.r. i work two different units and both units get along great with e.r. staff.
  8. by   RoaminHankRN
    WOW!
  9. by   CEN35
    happy to see my post has been up 4 hours now, and i wasn't tarred and feathered!!!!!!!!!!

    me
  10. by   judy ann
    I've worked both OB and LTC. (I know, a strange combination) Mom's show up in bunches. We used to say they came in by the bus load. Often they arrive at inconvenient times. Babies show up when they darn well please. Again babies are like bananas, they are in bunches. And we have absolutely NO control of them. So far as the LTC, I think the transfering facilities, be it a hospital or another LTC, wait till near the end of a shift to transfer. Those dear folks arrive when the care givers are trying to tie up loose ends and go home. Also, the grim reaper seems to arrive at similar times. Can't schedule him. Seems like maybe we could just roll with the punches and take them when the come in. Otherwise it's the patient and his family who suffers the most.
  11. by   deathnurse
    Yes, ER also gets patients at 10 minutes before change of shift. But ER is USUALLY the first to get sufficient staffing around the clock. When ER delivers a patient to another unit at 30 mins before change of shift this is needless, repetitive work on ONE of the nurses: Either the ER nurse going home who must give report to the next shift nurse who must transfer the patient to the floor, or the Recieving nurse who is going home in 10 mins, hasn't the time to admit/assess/do the family/etc, and then must transfer that to the oncoming nurse who is starting out FRESH. And that's the whole point. Give the patient to the NEXT shift ON the NEXT shift.

    When it comes to basic, move em' in, move em' out transfers, hold transfers for two hours during shift changes. You won't lose your nurses from disatisfaction. Why this stupid numbers game when "staffing for night shift?"
  12. by   fence
    The last 3 nights I have gotten admits from ER 30 minutes before it is time to start report. I work in ICU. It is frustrating but it is the nature of the beast. Our ER nurses work 6-6. We work 7-7. So I understand that they have been there 12 hours and want to go home. So in my opinion. If they have their work done and give sufficient report ( which they usually do) I don't sweat it. Yeah it makes shift change a little hectic but the on comming shift is usually very good at saying "just give me what you've got done and i will take over." We call it teamwork and I think people forget that the whole hospital is a team not just individual departments.
    Jimmy
  13. by   OzNurse69
    Yes, ED does get sufficient staffing round the clock - for a regular no. of pts. Unfortunately, some days (read most) are NOT regular. When we have pts lying down here for 24 hrs because no facility in the city has a bed to admit them into, we can't put up a sign out the front saying "Department Closed". However if all the ward beds are full, THERE ARE NO MORE ADMITS TO THAT WARD!! Not under any circumstances!! Bypass means absolutely stuff all if every other ED in the area is also on bypass - the ambos are going to come whether you tell them to or not - and even when bypass is actually effective, the ED still gets the same amount of walk-ins as any other day. We CAN'T close beds, we CAN'T cancel elective OT cases to make room, WE JUST HAVE TO COPE!!! (Can you tell I've had this discussion several times in the last few weeks, & I'm sick of it?)

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